Description: Maranoa Logo Process

 

AttachMent Paper

 

General Meeting

 

Wednesday 22 October 2014

 

Roma Administration Centre

 

NOTICE OF MEETING

 

Date: 17 October 2014

 

Mayor:                                                   Councillor R S Loughnan

 

Deputy Mayor:                                        Councillor W S Wason

Councillors:                                            Councillor J L Chambers

                                                              Councillor R J Denton

                                                              Councillor P J Flynn

                                                              Councillor W M Newman

                                                              Councillor C J O’Neil

                                                              Councillor M L Price

                                                              Councillor D J Schefe

 

Chief Executive Officer:                          Ms Julie Reitano

 

Senior Management:                               Mr Cameron Castles (Director Infrastructure Services)

                                                              Mr Rob Hayward (Director Development, Facilities & Environmental Services)

                                                              Ms Sharon Frank (Director Corporate, Community & Commercial Services)

 

Officers:                                                 Ms Jane Frith (Coordinator Corporate Communications)

 

Please find attached agenda for the General Meeting to be held at the Roma Administration Centre on October 22, 2014 at 9.00am.

Julie Reitano

Chief Executive Officer

 


Maranoa Regional Council

    

General Meeting -  22 October 2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Item       Subject

No

 

5            On the table

 

5.1      Material Change of Use - "Extractive Industry" (up to 1,000,000 tonnes per annum) & Environmentally Relevant Activities (16)(2b) and 16(3b) Extractive and Screening Activities (2014/18868)

            Attachment 1:           Background Report........................................................................... 3

            Attachment 2:           Development Plans......................................................................... 23

            Attachment 3:           Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning - Concurrence Response ................................................................................................... 24

            Attachment 4:           Lease Agreement............................................................................ 31

 

5.2         Use of Council Owned Land - Bassett Lane

              Attachment :           Map - 2 on SP212826..................................................................... 43     

 

1            Reception of notices of motion for next meeting

 

Reports 

 

11.1       Annual Financial Statements 2013/14

              Attachment :           Financial Statements 2013/14...................................................... 45

 

11.5       Public Interest Disclosure Policy

              Attachment 1:        Policy - Public Interest Disclosure 2014...................................... 96

              Attachment 2:        Procedure - Public Interest Disclosure 2014............................ 100

              Attachment 3:        Queensland Ombudsman PIDs policy assessment............... 114

 

12.1    Dust Seal - Binya Lane

            Attachment 1:           Nick Cameron - Ardno House - Request for Road Maintenance - Binya Lane Roma - 21/08/2014................................................................................................. 117

            Attachment 2:           Acknowledgement Letter to Nick Cameron Re: Request for Dust Seal - Binya Lane, Roma  117

 

13.14  Mitchell on Maranoa Gallery Signage

            Attachment :             Community Meeting Minutes - Mitchell on Maranoa Gallery - 1 Sept                                    118

 

13.5       Roma Saleyards - Truck Wash Consultation Report

              Attachment :           Roma Saleyards Truck Wash Report......................................... 122

 

13.6       Broadband for Seniors Kiosk Funding - Letter of Offer

              Attachment :           Broadband for Seniors - Letter of Offer..................................... 128

 

13.7       Local Government Boundary Anomalies

              Attachment 1:        Consultation - Western Downs Regional Council.................. 137

              Attachment 2:        Maps of Affected Lots................................................................... 138

 

Status Reports      

 

Next General Meeting

 

 

Confidential Items

 

In accordance with the provisions of section 275 of the Local Government Regulation 2012, a local government may resolve to close a meeting to the public to discuss confidential items that it’s Councillors or members consider it necessary to close the meeting.

 

 

Councillor Business

 

20.1       Minor Amendments to Councillor Portfolios

              Attachment :           Updated Councillor Portfolios – October 2014................................. 142

 

20.3       Water Security

            Attachment 1:           30 Sites on Coalition’s Dam-Building Shortlist - Article Published by The Australian - 30/08/14  143

            Attachment 2:           30 New Dams Shortlisted for Australia - Article Published by Sourceable - 02/09/14                     146

 

 

Closure

 


Attachment 1

Background Report

 

Background Information

 

Proposed Land Use

 

The application seeks to establish a Material Change of Use for "Extractive Industry” (extracting between 100,000 – 1,000,000 tonnes of gravel per annum) and associated ERAs on land at 29839 Carnarvon Highway, Tingun (properly described as Lot 3 on SP180959).

 

Details of Proposed Development

 

The application proposes the establishment of an “Extractive Industry” to provide for an annual production of up 1,000,000 tonnes of hard rock quarry material. On-site operations will include crushing, screening, stockpiling and distribution.

 

Under the Environmental Protection Act 1994, the application constitutes an ‘Environmentally Relevant Activity’ (ERA). The annual production of up to 1,000,000 tonnes will require an ERA under the Sustainable Planning Regulation 2009. An environmental approval is therefore to be considered in combination with this application. 

 

The application has been considered by the Department of Transport and Main Roads (DTMR), as the subject land gains access directly from the Carnarvon Highway. DTMR have forwarded conditions to be imposed as part of any development approval.

 

The subject site has a total area of 653.4 hectares, of which a defined area in the northwest corner of the property will be used for the quarry operation.  The site provides 2.5km of road frontage to the Carnarvon Highway and 4km of road frontage to Taunton Road.

 

Strip mining will be the primary method of material extraction. On-site buildings associated with this application include:

-     Office blocks

-     Ablution block with septic tank

-     Staff amenities/crew room

-     Workshop/Igloo

 

When operating at full capacity it is expected that the development will employ approximately 20 people. Regular operating hours will be 6am to 6pm Monday to Saturday, with no operation on Sunday. 

Figure 1 – Zoning Map/Site Locality                                              (Source: Bungil Planning Scheme)              

 

Figure 2 – Aerial Map                                                                                                        (Source: Google Earth)

 

 

Characteristics of the Site

 

The site is located adjacent to the Carnarvon Highway, Tingun, approximately 45km south of Roma and approximately 34km south of Surat.  Site access is provided via an unsealed single-vehicle access from Taunton Road, which has direct and immediate access to the Carnarvon Highway. The site is zoned Rural.  Reticulated water and sewerage are not available.

 

The adjoining properties are zoned Rural and are primarily used for grazing and associated farming activities. The closest sensitive receptor is a residential dwelling located approximately 200m east of the site boundary and 980m east from the nearest extraction area. Residential dwellings are located north (approximately 380m from the site boundary and 2.4km from the nearest extraction area) and south-east of the site (approximately 40m from the site boundary and 1.7km from the nearest extraction area). The Carnarvon Highway separates the subject site from the Brucedale State Forest to the east.

 

Transport and Haulage

 

Site access is currently provided by an unsealed single access from Taunton Road, which provides direct and immediate access to the Carnarvon Highway.  All weather gravel internal access/haul roads will be provided on site as a condition of development approval.

 

As a condition of development, the Department of Transport and Main Roads (DTMR) require the Taunton Road and Carnarvon Highway Intersection be upgraded to a sealed basic left turn treatment (BAL) and basic right turn treatment (BAR) to cater for Type 1 road trains. Taunton Road to the entry point on Lot 3 SP180959 will be upgraded to an 8m sealed standard.

 

Quarry material will be transported by way of B-Doubles and Type 1 road trains. On average, 55 vehicle movements in and out of the property per day are expected when production levels are at a maximum (1,000,000 t/a). It is expected that the majority of trips (55%) will head north on the Carnarvon Highway to the Warrego Highway, and 45% will head south. Of the traffic heading north, 15% will travel east and 10% west on the Warrego Highway. Of the trucks heading south, 30% will continue south toward Surat and 15% will head east.

 

Infrastructure Connections

 

The development site does not have reticulated water or sewerage networks available.  As a result, effluent disposal will be by way of an on site effluent disposal system.  Appropriate conditions of approval have been included within the schedule of conditions to ensure that a suitable potable water supply and amenities are available on site.

 

Public Notification

 

As the development application is impact assessable, public notification is required in accordance with Section 297 of the Sustainable Planning Act 2009. The application was publically notified between 25 July and 15 August 2014.

 

Five (5) properly made submissions were received during this period, the content of which is discussed below.

 

State Planning Policy and Regulatory Provisions

 

The Application requires assessment against:

 

SPP State Interest for Extractive Resources, however this states that Extractive Industries are to be assessed under the local planning scheme.

 

SPP Code for Water Quality.  The conditions of approval including the approved Environmental Assessment Report appropriately manage the items within this Code.

 

SPP Code for Biodiversity.  It is considered the items in this code are sufficiently covered by the Environmental Approvals for the activity and by the conditions of approval.

 

SPP Code for Natural Hazards.  The development is conditioned to have in operation a Medium Hazard Bushfire Management Plan upon commencement of use.

 

Definition of Use & Assessment Status

 

The Bungil Shire Planning Scheme defines the proposed use as:

 

"Extractive Industry" means any premises used for the winning or treatment on the land or on adjacent land, or gravel, rock, sand, soil, stone, or other similar materials. The term does not include the removal of materials authorised by Section 106(1) of the Local Government Act 1993, or mining within the meaning of the Mineral Resources Act 1989. Transport Infrastructure Act – extraction of material from roadway. 

 

The application is subject to Impact Assessment and requires assessment against the Desired Environmental Outcomes and the Rural Zone Code of the Planning Scheme:

 

“Environmentally Relevant Activity 16 – Extractive and Screening Activities”, threshold:

-     2(b) extracting, other than by dredging, in a year, more than 100,000t but no more than 1,000,000t; and

-     3(b) screening, in a year, more than 100,000t but no more than 1,000,000t

 

Desired Environmental Outcomes

The Desired Environmental Outcomes (DEOs) are based on ecological sustainability established by the Integrated Planning Act 1997, and are the basis for the measures of the Planning Scheme. Compliance is outlined below:

 

(a) Environment

 

(i)   The areas of high scenic amenity, remnant vegetation, wetlands, fauna habitats and wildlife corridors and regionally significant open space in the Shire are protected.

 

The site does not contain any areas of high scenic amenity, remnant vegetation, wetlands, fauna habitats and wildlife corridors or regionally significant open space. The development will operate in accordance with the Environmental Assessment Report which incorporates control measures for potential environmental impacts.

 

(ii)   Places, areas or sites identified as being susceptible to land degradation, including contamination, erosion, salinity and landslip, are protected and further degradation is minimised.

 

The Environmental Assessment Report incorporates measures for preventing land degradation. Land degradation will be avoided through the implementation of the Environmental Assessment Report as well as through erosion and sediment prevention conditions within the approval.

 

(iii)  Ecological sustainability is achieved by maintaining and improving biodiversity, water and air quality.

 

The Environmental Assessment Report addresses ecological sustainability through the identification of potential environmental impacts and appropriate control measures. Ecological sustainability will be ensured through the implementation of Environmental Assessment Report as well as appropriate conditions of development approval.

 

(iv) Places of historical and indigenous cultural heritage and social significance are protected, maintained and enhanced.

 

The site is not identified as being in, or in close proximity to, a place of historical, cultural or social significance. A draft Heritage Management Plan has been prepared and includes procedures that will ensure that if any heritage values are identified, they will be protected.

 

(b) Economic

 

(i)   Good Quality Agricultural Land is protected as a major economic resource for the region.

 

The site is mapped as containing Good Quality Agricultural Land. The Quarry operation is limited to a small defined area of the site and will not compromise the balance of the property being used for agricultural purposes.

 

(ii)  Key Resource Areas, extractive resources, petroleum, gas and mineral resources are protected as a major economic resource for the region.

 

This application is for extractive industry, suitably located in the Rural Zone.

 

(iii) Industry, business and employment opportunities are improved and appropriately located to service the community and region, and encourage economic activity within the local area.

 

The proposed development is for an extractive industry, providing material for civil construction, generally contributing to the economic growth of the region.

 

(iv) Rural business opportunities are improved to protect and value-add to the existing rural based economy.

 

The proposed development brings diversity to the existing rural based economy and contributes to resource industry requirements at a local level. The development will generally improve local business opportunities and contribute to the existing rural based economy.

 

(c)  Community Well-Being & Lifestyle

 

(i)   A convenient access to roads and services is achieved through well located land uses and the efficient use and timely provision of infrastructure such as water, sewerage and roads walkways and cycling facilities.

 

The proposed development will gain vehicle access via Taunton Road to the Carnarvon Highway. Convenient access to the Carnarvon Highway offers effective transportation of the extracted materials while keeping heavy vehicle haulage on local roads to a minimum.

 

The development places minimal demand on water and sewage infrastructure. The site does not require reticulated water supply or sewerage, as these services are provided on site.  Matters relating to the provision of other infrastructure needs can be appropriately addressed by way of conditions of development approval.

 

(ii)  Rural residential and urban residential development occurs in distinct localities that provide a sense of community, amenity, services, and a safe, affordable living environment, whilst maintaining rural amenity.

 

The proposed development is for an extractive industry, appropriately located in the Rural zone. Haulage from the site will occur directly along the Carnarvon Highway, and will not increase traffic within any nearby town. Separation distances from sensitive receptors are provided in line with the Planning Scheme. Conditions of development approval including relocation of haul roads away from adjoining properties and noise buffers will be attached to the development approval to further mitigate against impacts to rural amenity.

 

(iii)  Infrastructure networks such as road, rail, water cycle and electricity are protected from encroachment by sensitive land uses which may adversely affect or limit the normal operation of that infrastructure.

 

The proposed development is not considered to be a sensitive land use and will not adversely impact on the current or future operations of established infrastructure networks.  

 

(iv)  The role and identity of Injune as the main business and community center of the shire is consolidated.

 

The proposed development will not compromise Injune as the main business and community centre of the shire.

 

(v)   The adverse effects from natural and other hazards, including bushfires are minimised.

 

The site is mapped as containing Medium Bushfire Hazard. Matters relating to bushfire management can be appropriately controlled by the provision of a Bushfire Management Plan, which is required as a condition of approval

 

(vi)  The range of housing types, services and facilities meets the needs of the community and other uses.

 

The proposal is for a quarry in the Rural Zone will not affect the range of housing types in any town.

 

Overall Outcomes for Rural Zone Code

The Rural Zone Code identifies overall outcomes providing direction about relevant assessment issues.  The overall outcomes for the Rural Zone Code are the purpose of the code.  The code seeks to ensure that development within the Rural Zone:

 

(a)  reflects the economic potential of the rural area

 

The proposed development utilizes a natural resource to develop the economic potential and contribute to the growth of the resource industry within the Maranoa Region. The quarry contributes to the economic potential of the rural area.

 

(b)  is appropriately located within the Rural Zone and existing and future rural activities are not prejudiced by inappropriate development

 

Extractive Industry is most appropriately located in the Rural Zone. Future rural activities will not be jeopardized the appropriate separation distances from adjoining land uses and the environmental control measures proposed in the Environmental Assessment Report.

 

(c)   maintains the environment, including soil, air and water, compatible with healthy natural systems and ensures public health and safety

 

Matters relating to environmental integrity are addressed in the Environmental Assessment Report and are addressed through the relevant conditions for the development approval. 

 

(d)  protects Good Quality Agricultural (GQAL) from fragmentation, alienation or encroachment of incompatible land uses in accordance with State Planning Policy 1/92 – “Development and Conservation of Agricultural Land”

 

The site is not mapped as containing Good Quality Agricultural Land. The Quarry operations are limited to a defined area of the property and will not compromise the remainder of the site being used for agricultural purposes.

 

(e)  is located, designed and operated in a manner that protects and enhances the predominant rural scale, intensity, form and character

 

The proposed development will be undertaken within a small percentage of the total area of the 653 hectare parcel. Through conditions of development approval, the quarry will achieve appropriate separation from sensitive land uses and buildings and excavation activities associated with the use will be appropriately setback and buffered from site boundaries. 

 

(f)    maintains the rural amenity

 

Operations will be limited to a defined area within the site and, through conditions of development approval, will be appropriately separated and buffered from residences on adjoining properties. Thick vegetation exists along the road reserve at the western site boundary that screens the development from the view of traffic along the Carnarvon Highway

 

(g)  does not prejudice or impact adversely on other uses including those within other Zones

 

The proposed development will not prejudice the establishment of other uses within the locality, including those within other zones.

 

(h)  has an appropriately designed access to the road network and traffic generated by the development does not impact adversely on the local road network

 

Access is provided from the Carnarvon Highway, and is required to be upgraded to with BAL and BAR turns and to be sealed in order to accommodate the increased usage. Impacts on the local road network are to be mitigated (in part) by the conditions requiring a Network Access Charge against tonnage hauled from the site.

 

(i)    protects areas and sites of conservation importance, including cultural and high landscape values

 

The site has not been identified as containing any areas of cultural significance.

 

(j)    is undertaken in an orderly and logical sequence to achieve an efficient provision of infrastructure

 

The proposed development does not represent out-of-sequence development, and supports the efficient provision of infrastructure by the provision of civil construction materials.

 

(k)   is located and designed in ways that minimise the need for flood, bushfire and landslide mitigation and to protect people and premises from such natural events

 

The Environmental Assessment Report outlines environmental control measures to protect against land degradation. Conditions of approval concerning bushfire, and erosion and sediment control ensure the protection of people and premises from such natural events.

 

(l)    has water supply, stormwater disposal, sustainable effluent and waste disposal and power to appropriate standards adequate for the use

 

Matters related to water supply, stormwater disposal, sustainable effluent and waste disposal and power are addressed by conditions of approval. Potable water is to be trucked to site, bore water is available for onsite watering as required. Effluent is to be managed by an off site effluent disposal service.

 

(m) does not impact adversely on infrastructure

 

Impacts on infrastructure are to be appropriately addressed by way of conditions of development approval. Impacts on the local road network are mitigated by the application of charges for transportation of heavy materials within the region via the application of the Network Access Charge to the development.

 

The Code’s relevant Performance Criteria are shown below, in order to more easily permit structured and detailed consideration of relevant issues—

 

Rural Zone Code

 

 

Performance Criteria

Assessment responses

A.  A. For all the Rural Zone

1. Infrastructure

PC 1 Electricity

Premises are provided with a supply of electricity adequate for the activity.

 

Reticulated Electricity will be supplied to the site.

 

PC 2 Water Supply

Premises are provided with an adequate volume and supply of water for the activity.

A bore will be provided for operational purposes (watering etc) and as a domestic water supply.

PC 3 Effluent Disposal

To ensure that public health and environmental values are preserved, all premises provide for the treatment and disposal of effluent and other waste water.

A condition of development approval requires that at all times during the operation on site effluent is to be disposed of in accordance with Queensland Plumbing and Wastewater Code 2013 and AS1547.2012 (On-site domestic wastewater management).

 

 

PC 4 Stormwater/Inter-Allotment Drainage

Stormwater is collected and discharged so as to:

(a) protect the stability of buildings or the use adjacent land;

(b) prevent the water-logging of nearby land; and

(c) protect and maintain environmental values.

Matters relating to the collection and discharge of stormwater are appropriately addressed by way of conditions of development approval concerning erosion and sediment control, and by the Environmental Activities approvals issued by EHP .

 

 

PC 5 Vehicle Access

Vehicle access is provided to a standard appropriate for the use.

 

An existing access road will be upgraded as per DTMR design guidelines and conditions of development approval requiring sealing of Taunton Road to the property boundary.

PC 6 Parking and manoeuvring

Vehicle parking and service vehicle provision is adequate for the use whilst ensuring both safe and functional operation for motorists and pedestrians.

The proposed activity is located on a large rural allotment, with sufficient area for onsite vehicle parking and manoeuvring.

 

 

PC 7.1 Roads

All weather road access is provided between the premises and the existing road network.

An existing access road connection with the highway will be upgraded as per DTMR design guidelines and conditions of development approval requiring an upgrade of Taunton Road to the property boundary.

 

The site provides convenient and access to the Carnarvon Highway, which provides access to the wider road network.

PC 7.2 Location

Development must be located where there is convenient access.

 

The site provides vehicle access to the Carnarvon Highway.

PC 8.1 Highways

All Highways are maintained and enhanced as a link between major centres.

 

PC 8.2 State Controlled Roads

Development adjacent to State Controlled

Roads is located to ensure safe and efficient use of the highway and maintain the integrity of the highway as a commuter link

 

PC 8.3 Noise Sensitive Developments

Noise sensitive developments (residential, educational and community) must ensure that road traffic noise levels are appropriately managed to achieve acceptable levels of amenity.

There is an existing access to the Carnarvon Highway and it is proposed to use this access for the increase in haulage truck movements.

 

 

Department of Transport and Main Roads have assessed the development application in relation to impacts on road infrastructure, and have imposed conditions, including access upgrades.

 

The development is not a noise sensitive development.

 

 

 

 

PC 9 Gas and Oil Pipelines

Buildings are located at an appropriate distance from pipelines to ensure community safety and operation of the use is not compromised.

There is a gas pipeline easement over the eastern part of the site, however the nearest quarrying activities are proposed a minimum of 1kilometre from this easement.

PC 10 Refuse Tips and Effluent Treatment Plants

Buildings are located at an appropriate distance from refuse tips or effluent treatment plants to ensure community safety and operation of the use is not compromised.

The subject site is not located in close proximity to any Refuse Tips and Effluent Treatment Plants. 

 

PC 11.1 Rail Corridors

Development is at an appropriate distance from the rail corridor so as not to prejudice safety, speed or intended role of the existing and proposed rail corridors.

 

PC 11.2 Noise Attenuation

Development adjoining the rail corridor is protected from the impact of noise

The subject site is not located within close proximity to any rail corridor.

 

PC 12 Electricity Transmission Line

Easement – Vegetation

Transmission lines within an Electricity transmission line easement are protected from vegetation.

 

No electrical easement is located on the subject property. 

PC 13 Electricity Transmission Line

Easement – Separation Distance

Habitable buildings and community orientated uses are located a minimum distance from lines to ensure community safety.

No habitable buildings are proposed as part of the development.

2. Environment

PC 14 Watercourses

Development ensures the maintenance of riparian areas and water quality including protection from off-site transfer of sediment.

Matters relating to maintenance of riparian areas and water quality including protection from off-site transfer of sediment are addressed by erosion and sediment control conditions of approval, and by the Environmental Authorities issued by EHP.

PC 15 Flooding

Premises are designed and located so as:

(a) not to be adversely impacted upon by

flooding;

(b) to protect life and property; and

(c) not to have an undesirable impact of the extent and magnitude of flooding.

Quarrying is not intended in areas of flooding.

PC 16 Air Emissions

Air emissions from premises do not cause environmental harm or nuisance to adjoining properties or sensitive land uses.

Matters relating to air emissions can be appropriately  addressed by way of conditions of development approval that require regular watering of haul routes.

PC 17 Noise Emissions

Noise emissions from premises do not cause environmental harm or nuisance to adjoining properties or sensitive land uses.

 

Matters relating to noise emissions are addressed by conditions requiring earth bunding at the extraction sites and by a minimum distance between haul routes and sensitive land uses of 500 metres.

 

PC 18 Water Quality

The standard of effluent and/or stormwater runoff from premises ensures the quality of surface water is suitable for:

(a) the biological integrity of aquatic ecosystems;

(b) recreational use;

(c) supply as drinking water after minimal treatment;

(d) agricultural use; or

(e) industrial use.

 

The maintenance of water quality forms part of the Environmental Authority issued by the relevant department.

PC 19 Excavation and Filling

Excavation and filling of land ensures:

(a) that both the amenity and safety of users of the site and adjacent land holdings; and

(b) soil erosion is kept to a minimum with remedial works.

 

Implementation of the Environmental Assessment Report and the Environmental Authorities will ensure amenity, safety of users and minimum soil erosion.

 

PC 20 Construction Activities

Both erosion control and silt collection measures are undertaken so as to ensure protection of environmental values during construction.

Establishment of the quarry requires similar activities to its long term use which are addressed by the Environmental Authorities and the approved Environmental Assessment Report and associated documents.

PC21 Separation of Incompatible land uses

Separation distances are provided to ensure;

a)   The future viability of surrounding uses

b)   Infrastructure items are protected from incompatible development

c)   An appropriate standard of amenity and public safety; and

d)   Conflict arising from incompatible uses is minimized.

 

 

 

The Planning Scheme provides for a separation distance of 200m (non-blasting) between an extractive industry and sensitive land use. The proposed development meets this minimum setback.

 

As a condition of development approval, all internal haul roads will be required to be 500m from any residential dwelling to further mitigate against possible negative impacts.

PC22.1 Development in the Vicinity of airports:

Development in the Vicinity of airports:

a)   Does not adversely affect the operation of the airport;

b)   Is designed and located to achieve a suitable standard of amenity for the proposed activity; and

c)   Does not restrict future operational demands of the airport

 

 

 

 

The site is located an appropriate  distance from the nearest airport (Roma Airport) and will not prejudice the safety and operation of airport activities.

PC 22.2 Airport Protection

The development of premises does not cause an obstruction or other potential hazard to aircraft movement associated with the airport by way of:

-     the physical intrusion of buildings or other structures into the Obstacle Limitation Surfaces;

-     attracting birds and or bats to the area which could cause or contribute to bird strike hazard;

-     providing very bright lighting or lighting similar to aerodrome lighting, which can distract or confuse aircraft pilots;

-     interfering with navigation or communication facilities;

-     emissions that may effect pilot visibility or aircraft operations; or

-     transient intrusions into the airport’s operational space.

 

 

The site is located an appropriate  distance from the nearest airport (Roma Airport) and will not cause obstruction or hazard to aircraft movement or airport.

PC 23 Good Quality Agricultural Land

Good Quality Agricultural Land areas as identified on Map R2 - Good Quality Agricultural Land are conserved and managed for the longer term and protected from development that may lead to its alienation or diminished productivity.

 

 

The quarry operation is confined to a defined area of the site and will not compromise the balance of the land being used for Agricultural purposes. 

PC 24 Vegetation Retention

Development retains vegetation for the:

(a) protection of scenic quality;

(b) protection of general habitat;

(c) protection of soil quality; and

(d) establishment of open space corridors and networks

There is no proposal to clear vegetation as part of this application and the site is not identified as containing any significant vegetation.

 

Rehabilitation of the site will take place when quarrying is complete in accordance conditions of development approval.

PC 25 Protected Areas

Development is undertaken to ensure areas of significant biodiversity and habitat value are protected.

 

Matters relating to the protection of area of significant biodiversity and habitat value can be addressed by conditions of development approval.

PC 26 Sloping Land

Development is undertaken to ensure:

(a) vulnerability to landslip erosion and land degradation is minimised; and

(b) safety of persons and property is not compromised

 

Implementation of the Site Based Management Plan will ensure landslip, erosion and land degradation is minimised and safety of persons and property is not compromised.

PC 27 Bushfire Hazard

Development maintains the safety of people and property by avoiding areas of High or Medium Bushfire hazard or mitigating the risk through:

(a) the siting of buildings ensuring setbacks from hazardous vegetation are maximised and elements least susceptible to fire are sited closest to the bushfire hazard; and

(b) the provision of firebreaks to ensure adequate setbacks between buildings, structures and hazardous vegetation

 

A bushfire management plan will be required as a condition of development approval.

 

 

PC 28 Buildings of Significance

The architectural merit and precinct value of cultural heritage items listed in Schedule 10 is maintained.

 

 

N/A – The site is not located in proximity to any areas of architectural merit or precinct of value. 

PC 29 Cultural Heritage

The significance of known places of indigenous and/or cultural heritage value is retained.

 

The site is not identified as being in proximity to a place of historical, cultural or social significance.

PC 30 Character Buildings

Development adjacent to buildings identified as heritage or character buildings in Schedule 10 incorporates design features, materials and details that blend with the existing character

 

The site is not located in close proximity to any character buildings.

PC 31 Residential Outbuildings

Rural amenity is to be maintained

 

The use does not include any residential outbuildings.

 

PC32 Buffers

Adequate buffers are provided to protect rural residential uses from agricultural, transport and industrial activities whilst also ensuring the integrity and viability of such uses.

 

 

The subject site is not located in close proximity to rural residential areas. Impact on the nearest rural residence has been mitigated by conditions of approval that ensure regular watering of haul routes, that haul routes are a minimum of 500 metres from the residence, that earthen barriers are placed to a height of 5 metres around the extraction areas, and finally that a domestic scale supply of water is provided to the nearest residence in order to mitigate against the possible loss of overland flow supply as a result of extraction activities

B. Specific Land Uses

PC 33 – Catteries and Kennels

Not Applicable to the development application.

PC 34-37 – Commercial Premises

Not Applicable to the development application.

PC 38-42 – Community and Recreation

Not Applicable to the development application.

PC 43-45 – Dwelling House

Not Applicable to the development application.

PC 46-49 - Forestry

Not Applicable to the development application.

PC 50-52 – Home Based Business 

Not Applicable to the development application.

PC 53-56 – Host Home Accommodation 

Not Applicable to the development application.

PC 57 – 62 Industry (Low/Medium) 

Not Applicable – The proposed development is for Extractive Industry

PC 63Telecommunication Facility 

Not Applicable to the development application.

PC 64-67 – Temporary Workers Accommodation

Not Applicable to the development application.

PC68-PC71 Tourist Facility

Not Applicable to the development application.

 

Filling and Excavation Code

 

 

Performance Criteria

Assessment responses

Filling and Excavation Code

 

PC 1 Visual Amenity

Impacts on visual amenity or instability of nearby land are minimised.

 

Site offices are concealed by a significant buffer of trees along the Carnarvon Highway.  Instability of land is managed by approval conditions concerning erosion and sediment control and by Environmental Authority conditions set by EHP

PC 2 Environmental Values

The environmental values of receiving waterways are protected

The environmental values of receiving waterways are maintained by approval conditions concerning erosion and sediment control and by Environmental Authority conditions set by EHP

PC 3 Drainage

Existing drainage of flood flows, either upstream or downstream of the site, are maintained.

 

Conditions of approval require the upstream and downstream flows from the site to be maintained

 

PC 4 Amenity

Filling and excavation minimises impacts from dust or noise

Operating hours are restricted to 6am to 6pm Monday to Saturday, and excavation is only to occur from 7am each day

 

Regular watering of haul routes is required to minimise the creation of dust along the haul routes.

 

PC 4 Amenity

Filling and excavation minimises impacts from dust or noise

Operating hours are restricted to 6am to 6pm Monday to Saturday, and excavation is only to occur from 7am each day

 

Regular watering of haul routes is required to minimise the creation of dust along the haul routes.

 

PC 5 Noise

Noise generated from filling and excavation activities are within acceptable levels that do not adversely impact on surrounding amenity.

A 5.0 metre high acoustic barrier or earth mounding shall be constructed around the location of the excavators at the proposed pit to attenuate noise and dust emanating from the extraction area.

PC 6 Safety

Filling and excavation is undertaken in a safe manner with respect to adjacent and overhead electricity infrastructure.

Within the site, extraction takes place at a safe distance from the local supply lines.  The high voltage supply running alongside the Carnarvon Highway is crossed by haulage vehicles once the vehicles have entered the council road.  The high voltage lines are designed to be at a safe height as they cross the public road.

PC 7 Infrastructure

That public infrastructure items and works are protected from adverse impacts by excavation and/or filling work

The public roads are sufficiently protected by the conditions of approval placed on the development by Council and by DTMR. 

 

The public electricity infrastructure is sufficient distance from the development for the infrastructure to be protected from the development.

 

 

Submissions

 

Five properly made submissions were lodged to Council during the public notification period. The submitter’s names and addresses are listed below;

 

June Kerr

“Greenswamp”

Carnarvon Highway

Roma QLD 4455

 

John York

Condamine Highway

Roma QLD 4455

 

Robert Kerr

251 Taunton Road

Roma Qld 4455

 

Jennifer Kerr

“Greenswamp”

Carnarvon Highway

Roma QLD 4455

 

C P Colley

Brucedale

Roma Qld 4455

 

The following planning issues were raised in submissions during the notification period. Each issue and the response are outlined below;

 

Issue

Response

 

Not Properly Made Application - Lack of Written Owners Consent; and

 

 

Council acknowledged receipt of the application on 6 March 2014.

 

Council considers Clause 11(b) of the attached lease agreement between the land owner (lessor) and the applicant (lessee) constitutes owners consent.

 

Clause 11(b) of the lease (attached) states;

 

The Lessor agrees to consent to a Development Application and agrees that it will promptly (and where reasonable, within 5 days of the Lessees’ request) do all other reasonable acts and things (including signing documents) which the Lessee may reasonably require to assist the Lessee in lodging the development application and pursuing a Development Approval including consent to an application or appeal to the Planning and Environment Court or the Court of Appeal should the Lessee wish to do so.

 

 

 

Not Properly Made Application - Mandatory Supporting Information

 

 

 

 

It is Councils position as the assessment manager that adequate information has been received for proper consideration of the development application.  Specific matters regarding the location of buildings on the site and their height have been conditioned as part of the development approval.

 

 

 

Compliance with the Bungil Planning Scheme –

Rural Zone Code

 

Council has assessed the application against the Rural Zone code of the Bungil Planning Scheme and is satisfied that the development application either complies, or canl be conditioned to comply, where required. Council’s assessment against the Rural Zone Code is provided above as part of the Body of Report.

 

 

Filling and Excavation Code

 

 

The Filling and Excavation Code applies to filling and excavation related to operational works. The Filling and Excavation Code has been addressed in this report above.

Compliance with State Development Provisions

The development complies with the relevant SPP Codes and Development Provisions by means of the approved environmental assessment report, conditions of approval, and the Environmental Authorities issued for the development by EHP .

Existing Permits and Compliance Matters 

 

Council has issued a show cause notice to the quarry operator.  This resulted in the lodgement of the application, and the developments assessment against the relevant assessment instruments.

Dust problem faced every day

As a condition of development approval, the quarry operator is required to relocate existing haul roads a minimum of 500m from any residential dwelling to help  militate against dust nuisance. In addition the quarry operator will be required to water internal unsealed roads upon receipt of any complaint regarding dust nuisance.

 

Council Officers will undertake regular random site inspections to ensure the quarry is operating within the confines of the development approval.

 

Noise is an issue 7 days a week 24 hours a day

 

As a condition of development approval, hours of operation will be limited to between 6:00am to 6:00pm Monday to Saturday. Any extension to these operating hours wills require Council consent.

 

An acoustic barrier in the form of a 5.0m high barrier or earth mounding is also required to be constructed around the location of the excavators and the pit has also been conditioned as part of the development approval.

 

Council Officers will undertake regular random site inspections to ensure the quarry is operating within the confines of the development approval.

 

 

Watercourse has been interfered with denying water to the adjoining “Greenswamp” property

 

 

Council understands that this issue is being addressed through the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection.  The approval has been conditioned to allow existing drainage of flood flows, either upstream or downstream of the site, to be maintained

 

Notwithstanding the above, a condition of development approval requires that the adjoining property be supplied with domestic water by the quarry operator until the watercourse has been reinstated.

Access has been restricted to Taunton Road by a gate and cattle grid.

 

 

A condition of development approval requires upgrades to Taunton Road.

 

Upgrades include part widening and bitumen seal at the western end of Taunton Road, which will require the removal of the existing gate.

 

 

Assessment Summary

 

Although the planning scheme requires Impact Assessment for the proposed use, it is considered that there is no significant conflict with the intent of the Bungil Shire Planning Scheme. The development is appropriately located within the rural area, and any matters relating to environmental impacts, protection of amenity and infrastructure upgrading can be appropriately addressed by way of conditions of development approval, and through adherence to the conditions of the Environmental Authority issued by Department of Environment and Heritage Protection.


Attachment 2

Development Plans

 


Attachment 3

Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning - Concurrence Response

 








Attachment 4

Lease Agreement

 













Attachment 1

Map - 2 on SP212826

 

                                                                                                                                                Lot 2 on SP212826

    


Attachment 1

Financial Statements 2013/14

 




Attachment 1

Financial Statements 2013/14

 


Attachment 1

Financial Statements 2013/14

 














Attachment 1

Financial Statements 2013/14

 



Attachment 1

Financial Statements 2013/14

 






Attachment 1

Financial Statements 2013/14

 












Attachment 1

Financial Statements 2013/14

 

















Attachment 1

Policy - Public Interest Disclosure 2014

 

1.         Purpose

 

The purpose of this policy is to:

a)   To acknowledge Council’s obligations as a Public Sector Entity as defined in the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010(“PID Act”).

b)   To establish Council’s commitment to the promotion and proper management of Public Interest Disclosures.

 

A Public Interest Disclosure (PID) is a report of suspected wrongdoing or danger.  For the report to be considered a PID and attract the protections under the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010 (PID Act), it must be an appropriate disclosure about public interest information made to a proper authority.

 

2.         Scope

 

This policy applies to Councillors and employees, and any person making a Public Interest Disclosure with respect to Council or its Councillors or employees.

 

3.         Definitions

 

Discloser

is a person who makes a Public Interest Disclosure in accordance with the Act.

Proper Authority

means a public sector entity which includes local government.

Public Interest Disclosure

is a disclosure of information to a proper authority in accordance with the Act, and includes all information and help given by the discloser to the proper authority.

 

The Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010 distinguishes between disclosures made by:

           

·    a public officer and

·    anyone else.

 

PIDs made by public officers must concern:

(a) the conduct of another person that could, if proved, be -

(i)  corrupt conduct (refer section 13 PID Act); or

(ii) maladministration that adversely affects a person’s interests in a substantial and specific way; or

(b) a substantial misuse of public resources (other than an alleged misuse based on mere disagreement over policy that may properly be adopted about amounts, purposes or priorities of expenditure); or

(c) a substantial and specific danger to public health or safety; or

(d) a substantial and specific danger to the environment.

 

PIDs made by any person must concern:

           

·    A substantial and specific danger to the health or safety of a person with a ‘disability' as defined in the Disability Services Act 1992.

 

·    A substantial and specific danger to the environment.

 

·    A reprisal taken against anybody as a result of a PID.

 

A person has information about the conduct of another person or another matter if either:

           

·    the person honestly believes on reasonable grounds that the information tends to show the conduct or other matter (subjective test) or;

 

·    the information tends to show the conduct or other matter regardless of whether the person honestly believes the information tends to show the conduct or other matter (objective test).

 

The disclosure is still a PID and covered by the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010 even if it proves not to contain this type of information.

 

Some disclosures are not protected by the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010, including disclosures made to the media (except in special circumstances outlined in Part 4 section 20); those made falsely or misleading; those which primarily question the relative merits of government or agency policy; and those that are made substantially to avoid disciplinary action.

 

Disclosures that are wilfully false constitute an offence under the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010.

 

The disclosure cannot be based on a mere disagreement over policy that may properly be adopted about amounts, purposes and priorities of expenditure.

Public Health Or Safety

includes health and safety of persons:

(a) under lawful care and control; or

(b) using community facilities or services provided by the public or private sector; or

(c) in employment places.

 

Reprisal

is where a person causes, or attempts, or conspires to cause, detriment to another person because, or in the belief that-

(a) the other person or someone else has made, or intends to make, a public interest disclosure; or

(b) the other person or someone else is, has been, or intends to be, involved in a proceeding under the Act against any person.

Wrongdoing

Is behavior or an action that fails to conform to the standards of law.

 

 

4.         Details

 

By virtue of their office or position, Council recognises the important role Councillors, Council employees and members of the public can play in the identification of cases of maladministration, corrupt conduct and the misuse of public resources or contraventions giving rise to dangers to public health and safety, the environment or to persons with disabilities. 

 

In accordance with the objectives of the PID Act, it is Council policy to:

i.    promote the public interest by facilitating Public Interest Disclosures of wrongdoing in the public sector; and

ii.    ensure that Public Interest Disclosures are properly made, assessed, and when appropriate, properly investigated and dealt with; and

iii.   ensure that appropriate consideration is given to the interests of persons who are the subject of a Public Interest Disclosure; and

iv.  afford protection from reprisals to persons making Public Interest Disclosures.

These outcomes (including information on how a PID may be made) are achieved via a Public Interest Disclosure Management Plan in accordance with Section 28(1) of the PID Act and this Policy.

Council recognises the sensitivities which can be associated with Public Interest Disclosures and the need to maintain public confidence in its process for managing Public Interest Disclosures.  To that end Council will:

i.    ensure that Public Interest Disclosures are managing appropriately in accordance with the requirements of PID Act;

ii.    maintain confidentiality of Public Interest Disclosures received (as per S65 of PID Act);

iii.   may prosecute any person who provides a false or misleading statement or information to Council with the intention of it being processed as a Public Interest Disclosure (as per S66 of PID Act);

iv.  may prosecute and will take disciplinary action against any Councillor or Council employee who takes or attempts to take a reprisal action (refer SS40 & 41 of PID Act); and

v.   ensure that the proper records of Public Interest Disclosures received (as per S29 of PID Act) are maintained, and that the confidentiality of all records created during the investigation and reporting of Public Interest Disclosures is preserved (as per S65 of PID Act)

5.         Review

 

This Policy will be reviewed when any of the following occur:

 

1.   The related documents are amended or replaced.

 

2.   Other circumstances as determined from time to time by a resolution of Council.

 

Notwithstanding the above, this policy is to be reviewed at intervals of no more than two years.

 

6.         Special Provisions (e.g. Privacy Provisions etc)

 

NIL

 

7.         Related Policies and Legislation

 

Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010

Local Government Act 2009

Crime and Misconduct and Other Legislation Amendment Act 2014

Crime and Corruption Act 2001

Public Sector Ethics Act 1994

Disability Services Act 1992

 

8.         Associated Documents

 

Public Interest Disclosure Procedure

Public Interest Disclosure (PID) Management Plan and Procedure

Queensland Ombudsman – Public Interest Disclosure Standard No 1

Code of Conduct for Employees

Councillor Code of Conduct

      


Attachment 2

Procedure - Public Interest Disclosure 2014

 

1.  COUNCIL’S POLICY COMMITMENT

 

1.1 Council recognises the important role Councillors, Council employees and members of the public can play in the identification of cases of maladministration, corrupt conduct and the misuse of public resources or contraventions giving rise to dangers to public health and safety, the environment or to persons with disabilities and which may not be identified and addressed through established internal controls.

 

1.2 In accordance with the objectives of the PID Act, and Councils PID policy, it is Council commitment to:

 

a)   promote the public interest by facilitating Public Interest Disclosures of wrongdoing in the public sector;

b)   ensure that Public Interest Disclosures are properly assessed and , when appropriate, properly investigated and dealt with; and

c)   ensure that appropriate consideration is given to the interests of persons who are the subject of a Public Interest Disclosure; and

d)   afford protection from reprisals to persons making Public Interest Disclosures.

 

2.  EXECUTIVE management TEAM COMMITMENTS

 

2.1 Maranoa Regional Council has an obligation to deal with wrongdoing within or associated with its operational jurisdiction, and to take corrective action to appropriately deal with such wrongdoing.

 

2.2 Maranoa Regional Council encourages any staff member who reasonably considers that he or she has witnessed or is aware of any wrongdoing to come forward and make a disclosure in accordance with Councils Public Interest Disclosure Policy.

 

2.3 Maranoa Regional Council aspires to an organisational climate where all staff members feel confident and comfortable about making a disclosure of wrongdoing and feel safe in the knowledge that they will not be subject to, or provided strong protections against reprisal.

 

2.4 Maranoa Regional Council believes that disclosure of wrongdoing is embedded in this Council’s Values, in particular, ensuring that all staff and Council itself can be seen by the public as acting with integrity in accordance with our Code of Conduct. Further, Council believes that all staff who come forward with disclosures of wrongdoing are acting as exemplary organisational citizens by assisting Council in promoting openness, accountability and good management.

 

2.5 When a staff member comes forward with information about wrongdoing, Council commits to:

 

a)   protecting the dignity, wellbeing, career interests and good name of all persons involved.

b)   protecting the discloser from any adverse action taken as a result of making the disclosure.

c)   treating any bullying, harassment, unfair treatment, victimisation or discrimination that results from a disclosure being made as a breach of Code of Conduct and Councils Public Interest Disclosure Policy.

d)   responding to the disclosure thoroughly and impartially.

e)   where some form of wrongdoing has been found, taking appropriate action to deal with it.

f)    keeping the discloser informed of the progress and outcome.

 

 

 

3.  COMMUNICATION STRATEGY

 

3.1 This PID Management Plan and associated procedures will be posted to Council’s website, and made available internally via the intranet.

 

4.  TRAINING STRATEGY

 

4.1 Staff Public Interest Disclosure Awareness

 

a)   Public Interest Disclosure Awareness Training will be provided to all staff as part of the employee induction process and via online training for existing staff (at least once annually). This training shall include:

 

i.)         the identification of what is a ‘wrongdoing’;

ii.)        the correct way to make a Public Interest Disclosure’

iii.)        an outline of the support and protections afforded to disclosers of wrongdoings; and

iv.)       how Public Interest Disclosures will be managed.

 

4.2 Staff PID Management

 

b)   Senior Managers and other staff who may receive or manage Public Interest Disclosures, persons making disclosures or other workplace issues relating to Public Interest Disclosure management will be provided annual training regarding these processes. Complaints Management staff required to undertake detailed investigations of Public Interest Disclosures will receive investigation skills training.

 

4.3 Councillor Training

 

a)   Councillors will be briefed regarding both Public Interest Disclosure Awareness and Public Interest Disclosure Management following each quadrennial election.

 

5.  PUBLIC INTEREST DISCLOSURE OVERSIGHT

 

5.1 The Chief Executive Officer has given authority to the Human Resources Manager to:

 

a)   apply consistent and appropriate assessment procedures to determine which complaints meet the requirements of the PID Act for treatment as a Public Interest Disclosure;

b)   monitor the investigation and resolution of Public Interest Disclosures;

c)   manage or coordinate the support and protection offered to disclosures;

d)   collect, report and review data via a secure and confidential reporting system about Public Interest Disclosures received; and

e)   report Public Interest Disclosure information to Council’s Executive Team (as required) and to the Public Service Commission.

 

6.  MONITORING AND IMPROVEMENTS

 

6.1 It is expected that the Public Interest Disclosure process will assist to:

 

a)   Promote good governance of Council’s operations through the investigation of, and attention to matters, which might otherwise not come to the attention of the Chief Executive Officer; and

b)   Result in the identification of public health and safety and environmental protection issues and their referral to appropriate authorities.

 

6.2 As part of the Administrative Complaints Procedure, an annual report will be provided to the Executive Team on:

 

a)   Issues arising from Public Interest Disclosures received during the period; and

b)   Effectiveness of Council’s Public Interest Disclosure Policy and Procedures.

 

 

 


 

 

PART 2 – PROCEDURE FOR DEALING WITH PUBLIC INTERES DISCLOSURES

 

1.   OVERVIEW

 

1.1. Public Interest Disclosures involves the supply of information to relevant public sector agencies, which may include Maranoa Regional Council, that reasonably indicates a wrongdoing. To receive the unique protections of the PID Act a disclosure must fall within the definition by s12 and 13 of the Public Sector Disclosure Act 2010 as reflected in Councils Public Interest Disclosure Policy. Please refer to Schedule B for Examples of matters giving rise to a valid Public Interest Disclosure.

 

1.2. Council and its Executive Team encourage the making of Public Interest Disclosures and are committed to the protection of persons who make such disclosures. However, persons making disclosures should also be aware that Council considers it is a serious offence for employees, Councillors or members of the public to make false or misleading claims with the intent that it be acted on by Council as a Public Interest Disclosure, or to defame a person/s or an organisation. Persons should only make a Public Interest Disclosure when they honestly believe on reasonable grounds the information they are disclosing to be correct. Where Council discovers that a disclosure has been made with false or misleading intent, such discloser may be subject to Disciplinary action in accordance with Councils Code of Conduct Policy or if appropriate other legal action.

 

2.   HOW PUBLIC INTEREST DISCLOSURES MAY BE MADE

 

2.1 In accordance with section 17(3) of the PID Act, Public Interest Disclosures may be made to a person of a “proper authority”.  A person of a proper authority includes any of the following persons of a ‘public sector entity’ (see s6 of the PID Act) where such ‘public sector entity’ or its officers’ would conduct business or undertake a function that relates to the nature of information being disclosed, the entity was the appropriate entity for a matter previously disclosed and such disclosure relates to a reprisals by another person associated with that previous disclosure, or that based on the information being disclosed, the entity has jurisdiction to investigate or remedy the matter the subject of the disclosure:

a)   the Chief Executive Officer or in the case of Council the Mayor; or

b)   for the government department, the minister; or

c)   if the entity has a governing body, a member of that body, including in the case of Council a Councillor; or

d)   an officer of the entity who is charged with the function of receiving or taking action on the type of information being disclosed; or

e)   if the entity is Council and the discloser is a Council staff member, a person who directly or indirectly supervises or manages the person who is the subject of the disclosure; or

 

2.2 A person may also make a Public Interest Disclosure to a member of the Legislative Assembly of the Queensland Parliament.

 

2.3 In Certain circumstances, in accordance with section 20 of the Act, a Public Interest Disclosure may be made to a journalist.  A Public Interest Disclosure may only be made to a journalist if a person including an employee, has already made a Public Interest Disclosure and the entity to which it was referred and the entity:

 

a)    decided not to investigate or deal with the Public Interest Disclosure, or;

b)    investigated the Public Interest Disclosure but did not recommend any action be taken, or:

c)    did not notify the discloser within 6 months whether or not the Public Interest Disclosure would be dealt with or investigated.

 

2.4 If a matter is disclosed to a Member of the Legislative Assembly, such member may refer the matter to another public sector entity if the MP considered that the referral entity has the power to investigate or remedy the matter that is the subject of the disclosure.  The PID Act itself does not provide a role for MP’s in investigating Public Interest Disclosures.

 

2.5 A Public Interest Disclosure may be made either verbally or in writing.  However where a Public Interest Disclosure is of a complex nature or involves serious allegations against a Councillor or a Council officer, it is recommended that the disclosure be submitted in writing and marked ‘Confidential for the attention of the Chief Executive Officer’ or other Officer, Councillor or Mayor as appropriate.

 

2.6 The Public Interest Disclosure should detail the incident or issue of concern in sufficient detail to enable an appropriate investigation to be conducted.  Council will accept and process anonymous Public Interest Disclosures but without discloser details Council will be unable to contact the discloser to obtain further information or to provide feedback.  Depending on circumstances, disclosers should supply:-

 

a)   their name and contact details (desirable);

b)   the nature of the wrongdoing;

c)   who they think did the wrongdoing (if possible);

d)   when and where the wrongdoing occurred;

e)   events surrounding the issue;

f)    whether they did anything in response to the wrongdoing;

g)   others who know about the wrongdoing and have allowed it to continue.

 

2.7 It is Council’s responsibility to determine whether or not a complaint would also constitute to a PID.

 

3. PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTS AND REGISTRATION

 

3.1 All Public Interest Disclosures and suspected Public Interest Disclosures will be referred to the Manager of Human Resources or the Director Corporate, Community & Commercial Services for processing.  Prior to commencing any referral or investigation processes, the Human Resources Manager or Director Corporate, Community & Commercial Services will undertake the following steps:-

a)   Step1 – Assess whether the subject matter qualifies as a Public Interest Disclosure within the meaning of the PID Act.  In assessing a disclosure, the officer must determine if:-

i.    the person making the disclosure is able to receive the protection of the Act;

ii.    the disclosure concerns a matter about which a Public Interest Disclosure can be made;

iii.   the disclosure meets either the subjective or objective test set out in the Act;

iv.  the disclosure has been made to an individual or entity who may receive a Public Interest disclosure; and

v.   the disclosure has been made in accordance with Council’s procedure or to a person listed in the Act.

 

b)   Step 2 – Determine whether the subject matter should be referred to another public sector agency.  This would apply if the disclosure is about –

i.    the conduct of the referral entity or a public officer of the referral entity; or

ii.    the conduct of an entity (including itself), or

iii.   another matter, that the referral entity has the power to investigate or remedy.

 

Referral to another public sector agency will not be made where the Human Resources Manager or Director Corporate, Community & Commercial Services considers there is an unacceptable risk that a reprisal would happen because of the referral. Where practical, the officer will consult with the personal that made the disclosure to determine whether there would be an unacceptable risk.

 

c)   Step 3 – Determine whether Council should investigate the disclosure.  In accordance with Section 30 of the PID Act, Council may decide not to investigate or deal with the public Interest Disclosure if –

i.    The substance of the disclosure has already been investigated or dealt with by another appropriate process; or

ii.    The entity reasonably considers that the disclosure should be dealt with by another appropriate process; or

iii.   The age of the information the subject of the disclosure makes it impracticable to investigate; or

iv.  The entity reasonably considers that the disclosure is too trivial to warrant investigation and that dealing with the disclosure would substantially and unreasonably divert the resources of the entity from their use by the entity in the performance of its functions; or

v.   Another entity that has jurisdiction to investigate the disclosure has notified the entity that investigation of the disclosure is not warranted.

 

d)   Step 4 – Conduct a risk assessment of a reprisal to the discloser and others associated with the discloser (including those who may wrongly be suspected of being a discloser) as a consequence of Council’s investigation of the disclosure and subsequent action.

 

If the risk is assessed as sufficiently high, a protection plan will be prepared to protect the discloser.  Where feasible, this will be developed in consultation with the discloser and subsequent actions.

 

e)   Step 5 – Register the disclosure in Council’s Complaints Management System.  The matter will be registered as a confidential item to be accessed and tracked only by the Human Resources Manager or Director Corporate, Community & Commercial Services as applicable.

 

f)    Step 6 – Provide the discloser or the entity that referred the disclosure, reasonable information including: -

 

i.    confirmation that the disclosure was received by Council;

ii.    a description of the action proposed to be taken, or taken, by Council in relation to the disclosure;

iii.   if action has been taken by Council in relation to the disclosure – a description of the results of the action;

iv.  the likely timeframes (if possible);

v.   their involvement in the investigation process;

vi.  the importance of maintaining confidentiality;

vii.  the protections under the Act that will apply;

viii. that Council will keep the information disclosed, including the discloser’s identity confidential, except as allowed under the Act;

ix.  how they will be advised of progress and outcomes; and

x.   who to contact if they want further information or are concerned about reprisals

 

If Council decides not to investigate or deal with a Public Interest Disclosure, it will give written reasons for its decision to the person making the disclosure (provided that their identity and contact details are known).

 

4.   INVESTIGATING PROCESSES

 

4.1 The Human Resources Manager or Director Corporate, Community & Commercial Services Manager as applicable, will commission an investigation of all Public Interest Disclosures excepting where a contrary decision ahs been made under Step 3 above.  Where appropriate, an external investigator will be engaged for this purpose.  In all cases the investigator must:-

 

a)   have the necessary skills or training to perform that task in a professional manner;

b)   not be under the direction of a person being investigated;

c)   be sufficiently removed from the issue as to not have a conflict of interest or perceived conflict of interest when undertaking the investigation;

d)   when assessing (and where necessary, investigating and taking action on) a Public Interest Disclosure involving allegations against Council officers, take account of Council’s; and obligations to the subject officers.  The fact that Council is relying on information obtained through a Public Interest Disclosure for any subsequent disciplinary process does not exempt Council from its obligations to the subject officers.

 

5.   TAKING CORRECTIVE ACTION

 

5.1 On conclusion of the investigation, the investigator will provide the Human Resources Manager or Director Corporate, Community & Commercial Services with a written report detailing the process followed and their findings.  The Human Resources Manager or Director Corporate, Community & Commercial Services will forward copies of the report to the Chief Executive Officer.

 

5.2 The Chief Executive Officer will use the report as appropriate to:-

 

a)   Inform improvements to service delivery, business processes and internal controls;

b)   Recommend any amendments to Council policies;

c)   Recommend amendments of the Management Plan to improve its effectiveness; or

d)   Instigate disciplinary action.

e)   Provide a summary outcome report to the person who made the disclosure.

 

5.3 Where disciplinary action is commenced arising from a Public Interest Disclosure, the subject officers will be afforded rights as provided for in Council’s Counselling and Disciplinary Policy.

 

6.   PROTECTION AND SUPPORT OF DISCLOSERS

 

6.1 Council will provide protection and support for persons making Public Interest Disclosures against reprisals by:-

 

a)   Treating all Public Interest Disclosures as confidential information to be recorded on protected files; and

b)   Taking firm disciplinary action against any officer found to have disclosed a Public Interest Disclosure contrary to this policy or to have taken reprisal action against the discloser.

 

6.2 A person making a public interest disclosure is not subject to any civil or criminal liability, or any liability arising by way of administrative process, including disciplinary process for making the disclosure.  In particular:-

 

a)   in a proceeding for defamation has a defence of absolute privilege for making a Public Interest Disclosure; and

b)   a person, who would otherwise be required to maintain confidentiality about the disclosed information under any Act, oath, rule of law or practice does not contravene an Act, oath, rule of law or practice by making a disclosure.

 

6.3 However, a person’s liability for their own conduct is not affected by the person making a disclosure under the Act.

 

6.4 Disclosures made under the PID Act are protected from being disclosed in response to applications made under the Right to Information Act 2009.  It should be noted however that agencies such as the Crime and Corruption Commission may require full disclosure of information held by Council.  Also persons making Public Interest Disclosures should understand that in particular circumstances their identity may become evident to other persons as a consequence of investigation processes.

 

6.5 Both during and following the investigation process support for disclosers will be provided proportionate to the risk of reprisal, and the potential consequences of a reprisal.  Protections under the Act are only available to a person who makes a Public Interest Disclosure to a proper authority.  For example a person making a Public Interest Disclosure to a journalist prior to making a Public Interest Disclosure to a proper authority would not be afforded the protections of the PID Act.

 

6.6 Similarly, false or misleading allegations with no reasonable basis will also not be afforded the protections of the PID Act.

 

6.7 In the event of a reprisal being alleged or suspected, Council will act in the interest of the discloser by:-

 

a)   attending to safety of the discloser(s) or affected third parties as a matter of priority;

b)   reviewing the risk assessment of reprisal and any protective measures needed; and

c)   managing any allegation of a reprisal as a Public Interest Disclosure in its own right.

 

6.8 Council will assist employees who make Public Interest Disclosures by:

 

a)   regularly checking on the discloser’s well-being;

b)   advising the discloser of the availability of the Employee Assistance Scheme; and

c)   where the health of the discloser becomes a concern, liaising with officers responsible for occupational workplace health and safety.

 

6.9 Making a PID does not prevent, or is intended to prevent, a manager from taking reasonable management action in relation to an employee who has made a public interest disclosure. (refer to Section 45 of the PID Act 2010).

 

 

7.   FURTHER ACTIONS BY DISCLOSERS

 

7.1 Within 28 days of a person receiving notification that the Human Resources Manager or Director Corporate, Community & Commercial Services has decided under Step 3 (above) not to investigate or deal with their disclosure, the person who made the disclosure may appeal to the Chief Executive Officer for a review of that decision.

 

7.2 A person dissatisfied with Council’s handling of their Public Interest Disclosure has an internal right of review to the Chief Executive Officer.  Disclosers are also entitled to raise the matter with other entities, such as the Queensland Ombudsman in cases of maladministration.

 

8.   PROCEDURE FLOWCHART


 


9.   DEFINITIONS

 

Discloser

is a person who makes a Public Interest Disclosure in accordance with the Act.

Maladministration

is administrative action that –

a)   was taken contrary to law; or

b)   was unreasonable, unjust, oppressive, or improperly discriminatory; or

c)   was in accordance with a rule of law or a provision of an Act or a practice that is or may be unreasonable, unjust, oppressive, or improperly discriminatory in the particular circumstances; or

d)   was taken for an improper purpose; or

e)   was taken on irrelevant grounds; or

f)    was taken having regard to irrelevant considerations; or

g)   was an action for which reasons should have been given, but were not given; or

h)   was based wholly or partly on a mistake of law or fact; or

i)    was wrong.

 

 

Corrupt Conduct

(1)  Corrupt conduct means conduct of a person, regardless of whether the person holds or held an appointment, that—

(a)  adversely affects, or could adversely affect, directly or indirectly, the performance of functions or the exercise of powers of—

(i)   a unit of public administration; or

(ii)  a person holding an appointment; and

(b)  results, or could result, directly or indirectly, in the performance of functions or the exercise of powers mentioned in paragraph (a) in a way that—

(i)   is not honest or is not impartial; or

(ii)  involves a breach of the trust placed in a person holding an appointment, either knowingly or recklessly; or

(iii) involves a misuse of information or material acquired in or in connection with the performance of functions or the exercise of powers of a person holding an appointment; and

(c)  is engaged in for the purpose of providing a benefit to the person or another person or causing a detriment to another person; and

(d)  would, if proved, be—

(i)   a criminal offence; or

(ii)  a disciplinary breach providing reasonable grounds for terminating the person’s services, if the person is or were the holder of an appointment.

(2)  Without limiting subsection (1), conduct that involves any of the following could be corrupt conduct under subsection (1)—

(a)  abuse of public office;

(b)  bribery, including bribery relating to an election;

(c)  extortion;

(d)  obtaining or offering a secret commission;

(e)  fraud;

(f)  stealing;

(g)  forgery;

(h)  perverting the course of justice;

(i)   an offence relating to an electoral donation;

(j)   loss of revenue of the State;

(k)  sedition;

(l)   homicide, serious assault or assault occasioning bodily harm or grievous bodily harm;

(m)            obtaining a financial benefit from procuring prostitution or from unlawful prostitution engaged in by another person;

(n)  illegal drug trafficking;

(o)  illegal gambling.

 

Proper Authority

means a public sector entity which includes local government.

Public Interest Disclosure

is a disclosure of information to a proper authority in accordance with the Act, and includes all information and help given by the discloser to the proper authority.

 

The Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010 distinguishes between disclosures made by:

           

·    a public officer and

·    anyone else.

 

PIDs made by public officers must concern:

(a) the conduct of another person that could, if proved, be -

(i)  corrupt conduct (refer section 13 PID Act); or

(ii) maladministration that adversely affects a person’s interests in a substantial and specific way; or

(b) a substantial misuse of public resources (other than an alleged misuse based on mere disagreement over policy that may properly be adopted about amounts, purposes or priorities of expenditure); or

(c) a substantial and specific danger to public health or safety; or

(d) a substantial and specific danger to the environment.

 

PIDs made by any person must concern:

           

·    A substantial and specific danger to the health or safety of a person with a ‘disability' as defined in the Disability Services Act 1992.

 

·    A substantial and specific danger to the environment.

 

·    A reprisal taken against anybody as a result of a PID.

 

A person has information about the conduct of another person or another matter if either:

           

·    the person honestly believes on reasonable grounds that the information tends to show the conduct or other matter (subjective test) or;

 

·    the information tends to show the conduct or other matter regardless of whether the person honestly believes the information tends to show the conduct or other matter (objective test).

 

 

Public Officer

Is an officer of a public sector entity, is an employee, member or officer of the entity.

Reprisal

is where a person causes, or attempts, or conspires to cause, detriment to another person because, or in the belief that-

(a) the other person or someone else has made, or intends to make, a public interest disclosure; or

(b) the other person or someone else is, has been, or intends to be, involved in a proceeding under the Act against any person.

Schedule Two

of the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010 outlines offences or contraventions endangering the environment. The Schedule lists a range of legislation that must be considered when determining if a disclosure is a PID.

 

Wrongdoing

Is behavior or an action that fails to conform to the standards of law.

 

 


 

 

SCHEDULE A

 

The following refers to Acts and relevant sections pursuant thereto, upon which knowledge of the commission of an office or contravention of such, giving rise to a substantial or specific danger to the environment, may provide the basis for a public interest disclosure pursuant to s12 of the PID Act – Refer Schedule 2 PID Act.

 

Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Act 2003

·    section 24 (1) (Unlawful harm to Aboriginal cultural heritage)

·    section 25 (1) (Prohibited excavation, relocation and taking away)

·    section 26 (1) (Unlawful possession of Aboriginal cultural heritage)

 

Environmental protection Act 1994

·    all provisions for which a contravention is an offence

 

Fisheries Act 1994

·    section 89 (Noxious fisheries resources not to be possessed, released etc.)

·    section 90 (Non-indigenous fisheries resources not to be possessed, released etc.)

·    section 91 (Aquaculture fisheries resources not to be released)

·    section 92 (Duty of person who takes or possesses noxious or non-indigenous fisheries resources)

·    section122 (Protection of fisheries resources in declared fish habitat area)

·    section 123 (Protection of marine plants)

 

Forestry Act 1959

·    section 53 (1) (b) (Interference with forest products on Crown holdings and particular entitlements)

·    section 54 (Interfering with forest products on Crown lands etc.)

 

Greenhouse Gas Storage Act 2009

·    all provision for which a contravention is an offence

 

Land Act 1994

·    section 404 (no trespassing)

 

Mineral Resources Act 1989

·    section 194 (Conditions of mineral development licence)

·    section 209 (Contravention by holder of mineral development licence)

·    section 276 (General conditions of mining lease)

·    section 308 (Contravention by holder of mining lease)

 

Nature conservation Act 1992

·    section 88 (Restrictions on taking protected animal and keeping or use of unlawfully taken protected animal)

·    section 89 (1) (Restriction on taking etc. particular protected plants)

·    section 91 (Restriction on release etc. of international and prohibited wildlife)

·    section 92 (Prohibition on breeding etc. hybrids of protected animals)

·    section 93 (Aborigines’ and Torres Strait Islanders’ rights to take etc. protected wildlife)

·    section 94 (Conservation officers prohibited in dealing with protected wildlife)

·    section 97 (2) (Restriction on taking etc. of native wildlife in areas of major interest and critical habitats)

·    section 109 (Compliance with order)

 

Petroleum Act 1923

·    all provisions for which a contravention is an offence

 

Petroleum and Gas (Production and Safety) Act 2004

·    all provisions for which a contravention is an offence

 

Queensland Heritage Act 1992

·    section 104 (Offence to destroy protected area)

·    section 155 (Contravention of stop order)

·    section 169 (2) (Restoration orders)

 

Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage Act 2003

·    section 24 (1) (Unlawful harm to Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage)

·    section 25 (1) (Prohibited excavation, relocation and taking away)

·    section 26 (1) (Unlawful possession of Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage)

 

 Transport Operations (Marine Pollution) Act 1995

·    all provisions for which a contravention is an offence

 

Water Act 2000

·    section 272(4) (Immediate suspension of permit in exceptional circumstances)

·    section 273 (3) (Notice to owner of land to remove vegetation etc.)

·    section 814 (Destroying vegetation, excavating or placing fill without permit)

 

 


 

SCHEDULE B

 

Examples of matter that could give rise to a valid Public Interest Disclosure

 

PID – by a Public Officer.

 

PIDs made by public officers must concern:

(a)  the conduct of another person that could, if proved, be –

(i)   official misconduct; or

(ii)  maladministration that adversely affects a person’s interests in a substantial and specific way; or

(b)  a substantial misuse of public resources (other than an alleged misuse based on mere disagreement over policy that may properly be adopted about amounts, purposes or priorities of expenditure); or

(c)  a substantial and specific danger to public health or safety; or

(d)  a substantial and specific danger to the environment.

 

PID made by Anyone.

 

PIDs made by anyone must concern:

Ø A substantial and specific danger to the health or safety of a person with a ‘disability' as defined in the Disability Services Act 1992.

Ø A substantial and specific danger to the environment.

Ø A reprisal taken against anybody as a result of a PID.

Ø A person has information about the conduct of another person or another matter if either:

§ the person honestly believes on reasonable grounds that the information tends to show the conduct or other matter (subjective test) or;

§ the information tends to show the conduct or other matter regardless of whether the person honestly believes the information tends to show the conduct or other matter (objective test).

Ø The disclosure is still a PID and covered by the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2010 even if it proves not to contain this type of information.

 


Attachment 3

Queensland Ombudsman PIDs policy assessment

 



 


Attachment 1

Nick Cameron - Ardno House - Request for Road Maintenance - Binya Lane Roma - 21/08/2014

 


Customer


Attachment 1

Community Meeting Minutes - Mitchell on Maranoa Gallery - 1 Sept

 

Held:                        Monday 1st September 2014 at 3.30pm at the Mitchell Library, Cambridge Street, Mitchell

 

 

Attendees:                Rosie Bryant, Cecily Douglas, Doug Stewart, Laura Douglas, Kathy Rush, Joan Hurtado, Dave Hurtado, Pat       Small,   Patricia Kenafahe, Hilda Norrman, Kim Noon, Michelle Roberts, Gigi Robertson, Kerrol Blacket, Glenda McKnight, Megan Swords, Ed Sims, Jacqui Burns, Cr. Jan Chambers

 

Discussion items:

·    Signage for the Mitchell on Maranoa Gallery – staged plan to address the issue of the lack of signage for the gallery/library

·    Friends of the Gallery – majority of attendees do not wish to commit to quarterly meetings. Discussed staying informed of gallery developments and exhibitions by email and telephone communication.

·    Marketing/promotion of exhibitions – any promotional material must be forwarded to exhibition coordinator for approval. Devise a schedule to promote upcoming exhibitions

 


Staged Plan for Signage:

Description

Action

Responsibility

Timeframe

Quotes

Visitor Billboards

Installation of 3 Information/Tourist Billboards in 3 locations in Mitchell

·    The Great Artesian Spa

·    Council Offices

·    Neil Turner Weir Park

MRC Tourism Coordinator – Megan Swords

Stage 1:

2014-15 Financial year

Before December 2014

Council approved budget item

Front Face of the Building

·    Restore poster frames – possibly include Perspex covering or magnetic covers for projection from weather and vandalism

·    Metal lettering (silver) above the Maranoa at the entrance to the building

Coordinator – Libraries, Arts and Culture – Jacqui Burns

Liaise with Laura Douglas for metal lettering

Stage 1:

Following Council approval and budget allocation potentially 2014-15 Financial year – completed by December 2014

TBA

 

 

Projected

budget $3000

Flags in the centre median strip

Installed canvas flag with Gallery

Installed canvas flag with Library

 

NB Verify with TMR that flag holders are to remain on median strip telegraph poles. Alternative option to seek approval for flag in the garden bed in the front of the building

Coordinator – Libraries, Arts and Culture – Jacqui Burns

Stage 1:

Following Council approval and budget allocation potentially

2014-15 Financial year – completed by December 2014

 

TBA

 

Projected budget $1000

A Frame Sandwich Board

Source large A frame board to promote current exhibitions

Coordinator – Libraries, Arts and Culture – Jacqui Burns

Stage 1:

Following Council approval and budget allocation potentially

2014-15 Financial year – completed by December 2014

TBA

 

 

 

Projected budget $1000

Gallery/Museum/Spa specific billboards on the highway before town

Installed billboards on private land. Possible Men’s Shed project

 

NB: Permission required from property owners

 

Coordinator – Libraries, Arts and Culture – Jacqui Burns

Liaise with Dave Hurtado from the Mitchell Men’s Shed

Stage 2:

Following Council approval and budget allocation potentially

2014-15 Financial year – completed by December 2014

TBA

 

 

Projected budget $3000

Directional signs at town entrances – east, west and south

Application to the Department of Transport and Main Roads

Coordinator – Libraries, Arts and Culture – Jacqui Burns

 

Liaise with ‘Friends of the Gallery’

Stage 2:

Following Council approval and budget allocation potentially

2014-15 Financial year – completed by December 2014

TBA

 

 

Proposed budget $2000

 

 

Contact List:

Name                                                             Preferred contact                                      

Kathy Rush                                                   4623 1412                

Pat Small                                                       4623 1614

Myrene McCormack                                                4623 6165

Dave and Joan Hurtado                             daveandjoan32@gmail.com

Patricia Kenafahe                                        kenmyall@bigpond.com

Hilda Norman                                               hnorrman@bigpond.com

Kim Noon                                                      cedarvale@bordernet.com.au     

Laura Douglas                                             brassrazu@me.com

Cecily Douglas                                             billdouglas@bigpond.com

Michelle Atwood                                          michelle_z_roberts@hotmail.com

Gigi Robertson                                             westwood4465@activ8.net.au

Rosie Bryant                                                 bryantalbury@bigpond.com

Doug Stewart                                                drstewart@waterfront.net.au                                

Kerrol Blacket                                               kerrol.blackett@bigpond.com                       

Glenda McKnight                                         Mitchell.library@maranoa.qld.gov.au

Jacqui Burns                                                            jacqueline.burns@maranoa.qld.gov.au

                                   


Attachment 1

Roma Saleyards Truck Wash Report

 







Attachment 1

Broadband for Seniors - Letter of Offer

 










Attachment 1

Consultation - Western Downs Regional Council

 


Attachment 2

Maps of Affected Lots

 




      


Attachment 1

Updated Councillor Portfolios – October 2014

 

 

Councillor Portfolios – October 2014

 

COUNCILLOR

PROJECT AREAS

MAYOR

Cr. Robert Loughnan                                        

·    Government

·    Community engagement and customer service

·    Resource sector

·    Flood mitigation and recovery

·    Executive management

DEPUTY MAYOR

Cr. Scott Wason

·    Major projects (including housing)

·    Saleyards

·    Executive services

·    Governance and organisational development

Cr. Jan Chambers

·    Environment (environmental health, waste, compliance, rural fire, pest management)

·    Finance

Cr. Joy Denton

·    Airports

·    Social services

Cr. Peter Flynn

·    Human resources (including training and employment)

·    Sport and recreation

·    Events and community development

Cr. Wendy Newman

·    Development (town planning, building certification, Council buildings and structures)

·    Property and legal (including native title, easements, leases, local laws development)

·    Administration (rates, IT, information management/records)

Cr. Cameron O’Neil

·    Town roads

·    Streets

·    Footpaths

·    Parks and gardens

·    Economic development

·    Master planning

Cr. Ree Price

·    Rural roads

·    Tourism

Cr. David Schefe

·    Utilities (water, sewerage, gas)

·    Engineering Services (plant and fleet, asset management, design services)

·    Quarries

 


Attachment 1

30 Sites on Coalition’s Dam-Building Shortlist - Article Published by The Australian - 30/08/14

 


30 sites on Coalition’s dam-building shortlist

·    THE AUSTRALIAN

·    AUGUST 30, 2014 12:00AM

Sid Maher

http://media.theaustralian.com.au/authors/images/sid_maher.png

National Affairs Editor

Canberra

https://plus.google.com/113238264937713210151

Shortlisted sites.

Shortlisted sites. Source: TheAustralian

TONY Abbott has been handed a shortlist of 30 sites for potential new or expanded dams as part of a plan to boost agricultural production and mining output in northern Australia and reinvigorate rural economies in NSW and Tasmania.

Government sources said that work on about half of the 30 sites could proceed quickly while the other half required further investigation.

The Coalition campaigned at the last federal election on building more dams and, in March, Mr Abbott appointed Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce to head the ministerial taskforce. The federal government is also planning white papers on northern Australia and the agricultural industry.

The dams shortlist includes the Fitzroy River in north Queensland and proceeding with the third stage of the Ord River Scheme in the Kimberley in northwestern Australia.

Commonwealth support for the central Queensland Nathan Dam and expanding the Burdekin Dam in north Queensland are also under consideration.

The list includes the Chaffey Dam upgrade near Tamworth and the Menindee Lakes upgrade. Both NSW projects have already received federal government funding commitments. Federal cabinet is set to consider the dams report within weeks but the decision on which projects to bring forward will be up to the Prime Minister.

Mr Joyce said the fact that a shortlist of 30 dam proposals had been handed to the Prime Minister showed the Coalition was serious about the policy it had taken to the last election. However he said it did not mean that all 30 projects would go ahead. The list had been pared back from 100 proposals that the Coalition examined before the last election. “The process is ongoing,’’ he said.

Mr Joyce said Australia was in a sweet spot in agriculture with the growth of southeast Asian markets but volumes would have to increase greatly for the nation to reap the benefit. “It will not happen by accident; it will happen by planning,’’ he said.

He said some dams would be able to proceed with funding from the private sector. Ord Stage II had proceeded with Chinese investment and there was no reason Ord Stage III could not proceed with private investment.

Mr Joyce said Ord Stage III was exciting because it had the potential to move water from Western Australia back into the Northern Territory.

The dams shortlist includes the Apsley Dam in NSW which was shelved in the 1980s by the Wran state government.

Mr Joyce said expanding water storage on the Fitzroy River and building the Nathan Dam would not only benefit agriculture, it would benefit the mining industry which required water to operate.

He added that it was necessary to invest now so that when mining began to expand again, the industry was in a position to take advantage of it.

Environment Minister Greg Hunt, his parliamentary secretary Simon Birmingham and Assistant Infrastructure Minister Jamie Briggs were also on the ministerial taskforce. The shortlist was formed after discussions with state governments on which projects were feasible and worthy of further consideration.

 


Attachment 2

30 New Dams Shortlisted for Australia - Article Published by Sourceable - 02/09/14

 

dam11

Tony Abbott has received a shortlist of 30 potential dam projects from a ministerial task force headed by Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce, as part of efforts to make good on the Coalition’s infrastructure campaigning during the last federal election.

The shortlist encompasses both the construction of new dams and the expansion of pre-existing dams in Western Australia, Queensland, NSW and Tasmania.

In the Sunshine State, proposed projects include a new dam on the Fitzroy River just south of Rockhampton, the expansion of the Burdekin Dam in the north of the state, and the Nathan Dam near Brisbane.

A raft of new dam projects are envisaged for NSW, including an upgrade of the Chaffey Dam near Tamworth and the Menindee Lakes upgrade, both of which have received funding commitments from the Commonwealth, as well as the Needles Gap Dam and the Apsely Dam, which was shelved in the 1980s by the Wran government.

The shortlist also includes the third stage of the Ord River Scheme in the northernmost part of Western Australia, which could help shift water from Western Australia back into the Northern Territory, and a dam project in north-west Tasmania.

The Coalition made the construction of more dams a part of its federal election campaign, during which Abbott billed himself as an infrastructure Prime Minister in waiting.

The dams are primarily intended to support the growth of Australia’s agricultural and mining sector and to help revitalise the country’s regional economies. Joyce pointed to the need for more dams to better prepare Australia for the huge potential market for agricultural goods in Asia, as well as the next cyclical upswing in the resources sector.

Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce

Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce

The damming of the Fitzroy River and the construction of the Nathan Dam in particular will provide benefits to Queensland’s water hungry agriculture and mining industries.

Joyce said the delivery of the shortlist of dam projects was a sign of the government’s determination to make good on its infrastructure campaigning at the last election. He warned, however, that not all of the 30 projects on the shortlist, which had been narrowed down from a total of 100 proposals from prior to the election, were guaranteed to proceed, and that the assessment process was still ongoing.

According to government sources, around half of the projects on the list could commence work quickly, while the remainder would require further consideration.

The federal cabinet will consider the dams report in several weeks, with the final decision on which project to support to be made by Prime Minister Abbott.

Published on 02 September 2014

CONTRIBUTED BY:

Marc Howe

Marc Howe

Marc Howe covers developments in the energy, mining and infrastructure sectors for Sourceable. He worked as a technical translator and business journalist in China throughout the noughties, but has since returned to Australia and is currently based in his hometown of Canberra....

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