Description: Maranoa Logo Process

Late Items

ATTACHMENTS Paper

 

General Meeting

 

Wednesday 23 October 2013

 

Roma Administration Centre

 

NOTICE OF MEETING

 

Date: 23 October 2013

 

Mayor:                                                   Councillor R S Loughnan

 

Deputy Mayor:                                        Councillor W S Wason

Councillors:                                            Councillor J L Chambers

                                                              Councillor R J Denton

                                                              Councillor P J Flynn

                                                              Councillor W M Newman

                                                              Councillor C J O’Neil

                                                              Councillor M L Price

                                                              Councillor D J Schefe

 

Chief Executive Officer:                          Ms Julie Reitano

 

Senior Management:                               Mr Michael Parker (Acting Director - Infrastructure Services)

                                                              Mr Rob Hayward (Director - Development, Facilities & Environmental Services)

 

Officers:                                                 Ms Jane Frith (Coordinator - Corporate Communications)

 

Please find attached agenda for the General Meeting to be held at the Roma Administration Centre on October 23, 2013 at 9.00am.

Julie Reitano

Chief Executive Officer

 


Maranoa Regional Council

    

General Meeting -  23 October 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Item       Subject

No

  

Reports

 

L.9         Pest Management Plan

              Attachment 1:        Officers Report - Draft Pest Management Plan................................... 2

              Attachment 2:        Drat Pest Management Plan................................................................. 4

 

L.4      Proposal to purchase a Christmas tree for main street - Commerce Roma

              Attachment 1:        Commerce Roma's Proposal to MRC for Christmas Tree - 18 Oct 2013     54

              Attachment 2:        Commerce Roma - Christmas Tree Quote - 18 Oct 2013................. 56

              Attachment 3:        Commercial Christmas - Additional Quote for Christmas Tree Project - 18 Oct 2013..................................................................................................... 57

 

L.6         Request for Sponsorship

              Attachment 1:        Brochure - The Centre Within............................................................. 58

              Attachment 2:        Email of Request - Puddy Chandler................................................... 60

 

L.7      Council appointment to the Board of Southern Queensland Country Tourism Ltd

              Attachment 1:        2013 SQCT AGM Notice to MRC...................................................... 61

              Attachment 2:        2013 SQCT AGM Invitation................................................................ 63

 

L.8         Organisational Structure

              Attachment :           Briefing Paper - Community Development........................................ 64   

 


Attachment 1

Officers Report - Draft Pest Management Plan

 

Officer Report

Meeting: General  25 July 2012

Date: 2 July 2012

Item Number: 15.1

File Number: D12/19490

 


Subject Heading:                     Draft Pest Management Plan

Classification:                                   Open Access  

Name of Applicant:                          Kay Crosby

Location:                                            Roma

Author & Officer’s Title:                 Sandra Crosby, Manager Environmental Health

 


 

 

Executive Summary: 

Maranoa Regional Council is required to submit a Pest Management Plan for approval by the Minister.  A draft Pest Management Plan has been completed after considerable consultation with keystakeholders, and is now submitted to Council for adoption prior to being furnished to the Minister Department Agruculture Fisheries and Forestry, the Hon. John McVeigh MP.

 

 


 

Officer’s Recommendation: 

That Council approve the draft Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan to be submitted to the Minister of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry.

 

 


Body of Report:

The attached draft pest management plan has been developed in consultation with key stakeholders.

 

Council is obligated in accordance with the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 to undertake consultation with identified key stakeholders and develop a Pest Management Plan.

 

The attached Plan has had two years of consultation and development, with it recently being presented to the Regional Pest Management group for comment.   The draft plan was initially collated with the five shire plans of Bendemere, Booringa, Bungil, Roma and Warroo.

 

There is an annual working plan to be implemented by Council’s Local Law officers in partnership with landowners and or managers. Currently, there is no species mapping integrated into this plan, as in the past three years all mapping information that had been collated had not been updated.  As such, the Plan will provide a link to the Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry website.  Council officers meet with Departmental GIS officers for annual information updates.

 

This Plan is to be reviewed each annum, which may become a project for the Regional Pest Management group.  It is expected that the Plan will be uploaded onto Council’s website for ease of access by clients.

Consultation (internal/external):

Department Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry – Roma Biosecurity Officer

Queensland Murray Darling Committee

Maranoa Balonne Catchment Committee

Regional Pest Management Group

            Santos, Origin, South West NRM (Charleville)

Risk Assessment (Legal, Financial, Political etc.):

Council has a legal liability in accordance with the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002.

 

Should Council not develop a Plan, there is a risk of political implications and non conformance issues

Policy Implications:

State policy is Council must develop a Pest Management Plan – there would be policy implications should this Plan not be adopted and implemented

Financial Resource Implications:

nil

 


Link to Corporate Plan:

Corporate Plan 2009-2013 8.3.4(a) To administer Council’s regulatory function in relation to our natural environment in the interests of protection
and responsible management that enhances the rural industry.

Supporting Documentation:

Nil

Report authorised by:

Robert Hayward, Acting Chief Executive Officer


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

 

 

1.0 Summary

 

Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan 2012-2016   has been developed for the benefit of this community.  The expertise of many local stakeholders (including local and state government agencies, industry groups, environmental representatives, community groups and individual landholders) has been drawn on in planning for the cooperative management of pests on all land within the shire boundaries.

 

The key objectives of the plan are to:

·    Reduce the economic, environmental and social impacts of pests within the Maranoa Regional Council area.

·    Improve the use of resources and expertise available for managing pests within the Council area.

·    Prevent the establishment of new pests and minimize the spread of current pests.

·    Improve the protection of environmentally significant areas.

 

 

This plan has been developed in accordance with the requirements of the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 and will serve as a guide to all local land managers.

 

 

2.0       Mission Statement

 

Maranoa Regional Council’s vision is: “to implement and administer Council’s regulatory functions in a fair and consistent manner and in the interest of the community as a whole”

 

 

To help achieve this Maranoa Regional Council has developed the “Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan 2012 –  2016. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABBREVIATIONS

 

MRC

Maranoa Regional Council

 

LLO

 

Local Law Officers

BSQ

Bio Security Officer with Bio Security Queensland 

 

DERM

Department of Environmental Resource  Management

 

DEEDI

Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation

 

QMDC

Queensland Murray-Darling Committee

 

MBCA

Maranoa Balonne Catchment Management Association

 

PWG

Pest Working Group within Maranoa Regional Council

 

SRN

Stock Route Network

 

SWNRM

South West Natural Resource Management - Charleville

WONS

Weeds of National Significance

 

 

 

 

Definitions

 

1080

Sodium fluoroacetate poison for vertebrate pests

 

Declared Animal

Animals that are declared pests under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002.  Land managers are responsible for the control of declared animals on their land.

 

Pest Animal

An exotic animal, causing detrimental impacts on the environment, industry or community activities.  A pest animal maybe a declared animal.  Pest animals are managed for impact reduction, usually through some form of population control.

 

Pest info

State wide weed and pest animal mapping database.

 

Problem Animal

An individual or local population of native animals that sometimes conflict with local or immediate human activities.  Native species are generally protected under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 and are managed for conservation goals.  Control is undertaken by authorised/accredited personnel or under permit.

 

Rapid Response Agreement

 

An agreement between neighbouring Local Governments to ensure a framework is in place to rapidly coordinate resources across a region to respond to critical outbreaks of pest animals and or plants, to help prevent infestation of neighbouring regions.   Gives stakeholders and authorities increased capacity to deal with critical outbreaks of identified pests.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

 

1.0       Introduction

1.1       Background

1.1.1    Responsibilities

1.1.2    Current Resources

 

1.2       Purpose

1.3       Objectives

1.4       Scope

Table One – Principles of pest management

Plans – integrated

§ National

§ State

§ Regional and Catchment

§ Local Government

§ Property

1.5       Stakeholder Input

1.6       Consultation Process

1.7       Review Process

 

2.0       Desired Outcomes, Strategic Actions and Success Indicators

2.1       Desired Outcome One:  Stakeholders are informed, knowledgeable, and are committed of pest weed and pest animal management

 

2.2       Desired Outcome Two:  All stakeholders are committed too and undertake coordinated management of pest weeds and pest animals

 

2.3       Desired Outcome Three:  Reliable information is available as a basis for decision making

 

2.4 Desired Outcome Four:  Strategic directions are established, maintained, and owned by all stakeholders

 

2.5       Desired Outcome Five:  Introduction, spread, and establishment of pest weeds and pest     animals is prevented

 

2.6       Desired Outcome Six:  Integrated systems for managing the impacts of established weeds and pest animals are developed and widely implemented

 

3.0       Priority Pest Species

3.1       Classification

3.1.1    State

3.2       Plants

Level of impact/threat

Distribution and density

Achievability or management objectives

Priority

 

3.2.1    Priority of Pest Plants – Management objective and control method

Parthenium

Harrisia Cactus

Rope Pear

African Boxthorn

Green Cestrum

Cats Claw Vine

Mesquite

Lantana

Salvinia

Parkinsonia

Prickly Acacia

Giants Rat’s Tail Grass

Water Lettuce

Rubber Vine

Water Hyacinth

Honey Locust

Chilean Needle Grass

Fire Weed

Mother of Millions

 

3.3       Pest Animals

3.31 High Priority Pest Animals

Locust

Mice

Rabbit

Dingo/Wild Dog

Wild Horse

 

4.0       High Priority Pests Annual Work Plans

Operational Action

Who is responsible

When action is to be taken

Success Indicator

 

4.1       Very High Priority Plants

            A – prevention of introduction

B – Eradication

C – Containment

 

4.2       high priority Animals

B – Early detection and eradication

C- Containment

D – Broadscale management

 

5.0       Implementation

 

6.0       Conclusion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tables

 

 

 

 

Table One

Principles of Pest Management

 

Table Two

Documents significant to the Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan 2010 - 2014

 

 

Appendix

 

 

 

Appendix One

Pest Plants and Animals within Maranoa Regional Council

 

Appendix Two

Map of identified weeds within Maranoa Regional Council

 

Not completed

Appendix Three

Map of wild dog scalps presented for payment under Council’s bonus payment scheme map available from Maranoa Regional Council ).

Not completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

1.0       Introduction

 

The Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management Act) 2002 requires local government to develop, adopt and implement local area pest management plans as part of an integrated planning framework for managing pest plants and animals across Queensland.

 

Maranoa Regional Council’s Pest Management Plan 2012 – 2016 has been developed through the review of past Council Pest Plans and in conjunction with a local community working group.  It integrates with the Maranoa Community Plan, Council’s Corporate and Operational Plans, State management strategies for pest animals and weeds, State guidelines, plans and other relevant environmental legislation.

 

 

1.1       Background

 

Maranoa Regional Council covers an area of 58,830sq km that is home for approximately 13,000 people.  The region maintains a proud and productive rural industry which in more recent years has been complimented with industrial expansion in the energy and gas sectors.  The main agricultural industries within this region include beef cattle, sheep/wool, grain crops, cypress pine and wild game harvesting hat will be affected should control mechanisms not be implemented for pest plants and or animals.

 

Pest animals and plants are reported by the Department of Natural Resources & Mines (2004) as costing Queensland over $600 million annually in lost production and control costs.   Effective pest management helps protect the urban and agricultural industries upon which the Maranoa Regional Council area relies, as well as, protect the environment and human health.

 

Pest animals have the potential to alter ecosystems, reduce primary industry productivity and profitability, seriously limit the long-term viability of natural and agricultural landscapes and can impact on human and animal health.  A holistic approach must be adopted to achieve a harmonious balance.

 

Some economic and environmental impacts recorded for pest animals include:

·    Direct predation

·    Spread of disease

·    Degradation of native habitat

·    Destruction or damage to crops, pasture and livestock

·    Compete for habitat, shelter and food resources with both domestic and native animal

·    Social impact -reduction of economy – less people, less children, less services, reduction of finances                 

 

Pest plants compete with pasture species to reduce available grazing, plants may be toxic to stock (such as Mother-of-Millions), compete with crops for space, water and nutrients and in the case of aquatic pest plants can affect water quality and biodiversity within streams and wetlands.   Pest plants also degrade natural vegetation and impact on biodiversity.  Social impacts include effects on human health, recreation, safety and aesthetics.

 

1.1.1    Responsibility

 

Declaration under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 imposes a legal responsibility for control of declared pest animals and plants by all landowners on land under their management.  A full list of declared plants and animals can be found on the Queensland Department of Environmental Resource Management website:   www.derm.qld.gov.au

 

This Pest Management Plan has been developed to identify strategies and actions the Maranoa Regional Council intends to implement to manage pest plants and animals on lands under it’s jurisdiction to fulfil it’s obligations in accordance with the Act.

 

Individual landholders have the responsibility of stopping the spread of weeds on their land, minimising the introduction of new pests, monitoring pest species and their distribution, and observing hygiene measures and regulations.  Under Section 77(1) of the Act a landowner must also take reasonable steps to keep their land free of class 1 and class 2 pests where “their land” includes;

·    unfenced land comprising part of a road or stock route that adjoins or is within the owner’s land

·    other land that is fenced in with the owner’s land

·    the bed, banks and water of a watercourse on the owner’s land, unless the owner holds a declared pest permit

·    the bed, banks and water to the centre-line of a watercourse forming a boundary, or part of a boundary, of the owner’s land.

 

The Department of Environment Resource Management and local government provide practical skill and technical information to assist.

 

Local Governments and other issuing entities may give an owner written notice (a “pest control notice”) if a landowner does not comply with their obligations under the Act.  This notice would include a reasonable action the owner must take against the pest within a stated reasonable period.  A penalty could apply if such action stated in the ‘notice’ isn’t undertaken.

 

1.1.2    Current Resources

 

Maranoa Regional Council employs six full time Officers, who are authorised to:

·    Control pests on land under its control; and

·    Administer and enforce the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002, by monitoring pest infestations within the Shire.

 

These Officers' spend  about 60% of their time on pest plant and animal management and about 30% on stock route management and 10% on urban animal control.

 

In previous years, local governments of the area have provided financial assistance for trails on parthenium biological control mechanisms, which has ceased at this time.  However Council remains committed to working in collaboration with neighbouring Local governments and Catchment Management groups in the provision of educational material, additional spray units to landholders/managers for control of pest plants.

 

Maranoa Regional Council provides through the community benefit fund program, financial assistance to Wild Dog Control Groups within the Region for the implementation of coordinated management processes in their area.  Such assistance is used for aeroplane hire and meat purchase in regional integrated baiting campaigns only. 

 

A wild dog advisory group has been formed within the Region to provide leadership, and drive effective, efficient programs/actions that will integrate with neighbouring local governments.  The aim of the group will be to:

 

·    Develop new initiatives and strategies

·    Set direction for Council wild dog programs and expenditure

·    Work with other land owners and representatives from across the region

·    Identify and target problem areas

·    Educate and inform

·    Achieve key outcomes for your community

 

1.2   Purpose

 

The purpose of the Maranoa Regional Council  Pest Management Plan 2010 – 2014   is to identify pest animal and plants that impact and threaten now and into the future of this region.  Through planning to achieve an integrated partnership approach with this regions community, it is anticipated that resources and actions will be identified to meet goals of pest management principles. (Table One)

 

An annual action plan is incorporated and includes, program objectives, operational actions, current status of a pest, success measures and indicators, plus resources able to be allocated to the strategic management of each high priority pest identified in this Plan. 

 

 

1.3   Objectives

 

The key objectives of this plan is to:

·    Reduce the economic, environmental and social impacts of priority pests within the Maranoa Regional Council area.

·    Partner with landholders and land managers to achieve cohesive control practices.

·    Improve the use of resources and expertise available for managing pests within the Council.

·    Prevent the establishment of new pests and minimize the spread of current pests.

·    Improve the protection of environmentally significant areas.

 

 

1.4          Scope

 

The Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan 2012 - 2016 covers the entire land mass within the Maranoa Regional Council, including land owned or controlled by individuals, industry and or the state.

 

Species targeted within this Plan are listed in Section 3.0.  The local distribution outlined in this section only relates to land within the Shire managed by Council and does not include freehold or leasehold land, national parks, state forests and other land managed by the state.


 

Table One

Principles of Pest Management

 

Principle

Description

Integration

Pest management is an integral part of managing natural resources, biodiversity  and agricultural systems.

Public Awareness

Public awareness and knowledge of pests must be raised to increase the capacity and willingness of individuals to manage pests.

Commitment

Effective pest management requires a long-term commitment by the community, industry groups and government entities.

Consultation and partnership

Consultation and partnership arrangements between local communities, industry groups, State government agencies and local governments must be established to achieve a collaborative approach for pest management.

Planning

Pest management planning must be consistent at local, regional, state and national levels to ensure target priorities for pest management are identified at each level. Mapping, Budgeting, Personnel, Timeframe - must form segments of the planning phase.

Prevention

Preventative pest management is achieved by:

1.   Preventing the spread of pests and viable parts of pests, especially by human activity; and,

2.   Early detection and intervention to control pests.

Best Practice

Pest management must be based on ecologically and socially responsible pest management practices that protect the environment and the productive capacity of natural resources.

Improvement

Research about pest, and regular monitoring and evaluation of pest control activities, is necessary to improve pest management practices.

 

The relationship between these principles, desired outcomes and strategic actions are outlined in Section 2.0.


A number of other regional, state and national plans, strategies and policies have been developed to address pest management and related issues on a larger scale.  The Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan 2012 – 2016  was developed and will operate within these frameworks to achieve a collaborative approach to pest management.  Documents that are significant to this Plan are listed in Table Two.

 

Scale

Natural Resource Management

Pest Management

Pest Species

National

·    National Action Plan for Salinity and Water Quality

·    National Strategy for the Conservation of Australia’s Biodiversity

·    National Guidelines and Principles for Rangeland Management

·    Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act

 

·    National Weeds Strategy

·    Managing Vertebrate Pests – Principles and Strategies

·    Model Code of Practice for the Welfare of Animals – Feral Livestock Animals Destruction or Capture, Handling and Marketing

·    Strategies for Weeds of National Significance (particularly Parthenium and Parkinsonia)

·    National Pest Animal SpeciesThreat Abatement Plans

·    National Management Strategy for Carp Control 2010 - 2014

·    Australian Plague Locust Commission Strategic Plan

 

State

·      Queensland Biodiversity, Conservation and Natural Resource Management Statement.

·      Nature Conservation Act 1992

·      Water Act 2001

·      Environmental Protection Act 1994 (eg. control of Dingoes)

·      Transport Infrastructure Act 1994

·      Land Title Act 1994

·      Vegetation Management Act 1999

·      Animal Care and Protection Act 2001

·      Queensland Heritage Act 1992 (eg. managing pests in areas of cultural heritage)

·      Soil Conservation Act 1986 (eg. using non-invasive species to minimise soil loss)

·      Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Queensland) Act 1994 (eg. using pesticides appropriately)

·      Queensland Weeds Strategy

·      Queensland Pest Animal Strategy

·      Control of Exotic Pest Fishes Strategy

 

·      Queensland Locust Management Strategy

·      Queensland Mouse Management Strategy

·      Queensland Parthenium Strategy

·      Queensland Wild Dog Management Strategy

·      Queensland Rabbit Management Strategy


Table Two con’t…..

 

Scale

 

Natural Resource Management

Pest Management

Pest Species

Regional and Catchment

·      Regional Natural Resource Management Plan (Queensland Murray-Darling)

·      Maranoa Balonne Catchment Association Plan

 

 

·      APEC Parthenium Strategy for Southern Queensland.

·     

 

·      African Boxthorn

·      African Lovegrass

·      Blue Heliotrope

·      European carp

·      Feral cats

·      Feral Goats

·      Foxes

·      Giant Rat’s Tail Grass

·      Harrisia Cactus

·      Lippia

·      Macropods

·      Mesquite

·      Mother of Millions

·      Noogoora burr

·      Parthenium weed

·      Pigs

·      Prickly Pear

·      Rabbits

·      Thickening native plant species

·      Water Lettuce

·      Wild Dogs

·      Prickly acacia/Parkinsonia/Rubber vine

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scale

 

Natural Resource Management

Pest Management

Pest Species

Local Government

·      Community Plan 2010-2020

·      Maranoa Regional Council Stock Route Management Plan

·      Maranoa Regional Council Corporate Plan.  – 2009-2012

·      Maranoa Regional Council Operational Plan 2009-2010

·      Council of the Shire of Bendemere, Booringa Bungil, Roma and Warroo Planning Schemes

 

 

 

·      Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan

 

 

·      Parthenium

·      Wild Dogs/Dingoes

 

Property

·      Sub-catchment plans

·      Individual Property Plans

·      Environmental Management Systems (EMS’s)

·      QPWS Park Plans

·     

·      Ergon Energy

·      Telstra

·      Main Roads

·      Mining Company’s Environmental Management Plans

·     

 

 

 


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

 

1.5           Stakeholder Input

All previous plans developed by five Councils now amalgamated into the Maranoa Regional Council area were reviewed and combined to produce an initial draft.  

 

Maranoa Regional Council then established a working group to advise Council on the content of the revised Pest Management Plan in order to develop a collaborative approach to pest management.  Stakeholders involved and their responsibilities in this process are outlined in the table below.

 

Stakeholders

Representative

Responsibility

Industry Organisations

 

 Agforce

· Alignment of Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan with agreed industry strategies, policies and guidelines.

 

Community

 

 

· Provide local knowledge.

· Encourage community adoption of the Plan.

 

Aboriginal Groups

 

Bidjara

Manindangie

Iman

· Alignment of Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan with State management strategies, policies and guidelines.

 

DEEDI - Bio Security Queensland

Mr Graham Hardwick

Senior Officer

 

· Alignment of Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan with State management strategies, policies and guidelines.

· Provide local knowledge.

 

Environmental Protection Agency

 

Bernice Sigley

Gareth Graham

Peter Harrison

· Alignment of Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan with State management strategies, policies and guidelines.

· Provide Local Knowledge.

 

Landcare / Catchment Groups

 

Landcare Coordinator

/Mitchell and District  Landcare

South West Natural Resource Management Group, Charleville

Maranoa Balonne Catchment Management Group, Roma

 

· Alignment of Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan with regional natural resource management plan objectives and outcomes.

 

Maranoa Regional Council

 Bill Burke

Ivan Gillies

Greg Richardson

Ray Thrupp

Rhonda Abberton

Doug Gillett

Kay Crosby

· Provide Local Knowledge.

· Identify Maranoa Regional Council direction and available resources.

Maranoa Regional  Council

 

Cr. Jeff Watson

Cr. Jan Chambers

Cr. Tom Hartley

Cr. Rob Loughnan

· Provide Local Knowledge.

· Identify Maranoa Regional Council direction and available resources.

Adjoining Local Government

Balonne

Western Downs

Central Highlands

 

· Integrate and align adjoining Local Government Pest Management Plans

 

In addition to people involved on the working group many other key organisations and the Maranoa Regional Council community have been invited to comment on the draft during the consultation process outlined in Section 1.7.  The key organisations include:

 


 

Agricultural Industry:

·    Agforce

 

Service Industry:

·    Ergon

·    Queensland Rail

·    Telstra

·    Santos

·    Origin

·    QGC

 

Traditional Owner Groups:

Bidjarrara

Manindangie

Iman

 

Government Departments:

·    Environmental Protection Agency (Queensland Parks &Wildlife Service)

·    Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation

·    Department of Local Government and Planning

·    Local Government Association of Queensland

·    Department of Main Roads

·    Queensland Railway

 

 

 

Neighbouring Shires:

·    Murweh Shire Council

·    Paroo Shire Council

·    Balonne Shire Council

·    Banana Regional Council

·    Western Downs Regional Council

·    Central Highlands Regional council

 

Natural Resource Management Groups:

·    Mitchell and District Landcare Group

·    Maranoa Regional Council Catchment Management Association

·    Queensland Murray Darling Committee

·    Central Highlands

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


1.6           Consultation process

 

The Maranoa Regional Council community were invited to comment on the Draft Plan from August – November 2010. 

 

Notice of the plan was published in the Western Star Newspaper, Maranoa Mail and t Maranoa Regional Council web site.

 

Copies of the Draft Plan were sent to each of the Stakeholders listed in Section 1.7, inviting them directly to comment on the Plan. 

 

 

 

 

1.7           Review Process

 

A major review of the Maranoa Regional Council’s Pest Management Plan will be undertaken every four years, with necessary minor updates being made on an annual basis to reflect changes in resources, pest threats, legislation and/or policy.

 

2.0       Desired Outcomes, Strategic Actions and Success Indicators

 

The Maranoa Regional Council Pests Management Plan will only achieve success through cooperative working relationship, processes and actions as nominated.  Individual stakeholders on their own cannot achieve stipulated goals for this region. 

 

·      Stakeholders are informed, knowledgeable, and have ownership of weed and pest animal management.

·      All stakeholders need to be committed too, and undertake coordinated management of weeds and pest animals.

·      Reliable information to be sourced and made available as a basis for decision making process.

·      Strategic directions are established, maintained, and owned by all stakeholders.

·      The introduction, establishment, and spread of weeds and pest animals are prevented and/or minimised.

·      Integrated systems for managing the impacts of established weeds and pest animals are developed and widely implemented.

 

 

 

Each desired outcome and associated strategic objectives, actions and success criteria are outlined in Sections 2.1 to 2.6.

 

 

 


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

2.1       Desired Outcome One:       

 

Stakeholders are informed, knowledgeable and are committed to pest weed and animal management

 

Success Criteria:

·    The extent to which appropriate information is available to stakeholders.

·    How aware the community are of pests within the region and their impacts.

·    How aware regional and state organisations are of pest management activities within Maranoa Regional Council area.

·    The degree to which individuals and stakeholders pursue education and training.

 

 
 


State Principle:

·    Public Awareness

 

 

 

 

 

Issue

Strategic Objective

Strategic Actions

 

Who

When

Success Indicators

Awareness

To increase community, industry, agribusiness and government awareness of pests and their impacts.

Build partnerships with local Landcare and tourist groups to produce interpretative material which lists weeds identified within this Plan, their impact, a description and photo (using the “Pest Fact” information provided by the Department of Employment Economic Development and Innovation ) and provide this information to:

·   All Rate payers

·   Owners / Drovers of cattle travelling or agisting within the region

·   Tourists through accommodation businesses and information centres

·   Sub-catchment planning groups

·   Game Harvesters

·   Service Industries (Telstra, Ergon)

·   Oil & Gas Companies

Transport BusinessesAnd within this same information package ask these stakeholders to notify Council of any pest sightings.

 

MRC

2010-2014

No. of information booklets or posters produced and distributed within each of the community groups identified.

 

75% of landholders have the ability to identify the priority pests within the Shire (short survey filled out by cropping, industry, sub-catchment, Landcare groups).

 

 


Desired Outcome One con’t…

 

 

Issue

Strategic Objective

Strategic Actions

 

Who

When

Success Indicators

Awareness

con’t…

con’t…

To increase

community, industry, agribusiness and government awareness of pests and their impacts

Build partnerships with other organizations (including neighbouring Councils, industry and tourist bodies) to source funding and provide signage as required in strategic areas along stock routes and roadways encouraging users to be aware of priority pest plants, how they are spread and the impacts they can have on the local community.

 

MRC (LLO)

2010

No. of locations identified and no. of pest awareness signs erected.

 

No. of tourists (20%),  and service industries (80%) aware of priority pests within the Shire – (short survey and evaluation process developed to determine this).

 

Participate in regional pest management meetings

 

MRC (LLO)

On-going

At least two regional meetings attended per year.

 

 Maranoa Regional Council pest management priorities reflected in Regional plans and activities.

 

Promote good local pest management activities undertaken by Maranoa Regional Council.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of articles published in local and regional newspapers.

 

Build partnerships with local landcare and tourist organizations to organise pest plant and animal awareness raising activities at local events (for example, local shows, field days, Agforce / grower meetings and popular tourist sites). 

 

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of events at which pest plant and animal resource material is displayed.


Desired Outcome One Con’t…

 

Issue

Strategic Objective

Strategic Actions

 

Who

When

Success Indicators

Education and Training

To enhance local government officer’s knowledge of pest impacts and their capacity and skills in pest management.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maranoa Regional Council’s LLO’s  and where needed Supervisors and Information Technological Officers attend:

·    Nationally accredited competency-based training in weed and vertebrate pest management.

·    Workplace health and safety training

·    Accredited vehicle wash down training

·    Queensland Department of Health approved training in the use of sodium fluoroacetate (1080)

·    Agsafe training courses such as ‘Principles of pest management’ and ‘Chemical handling, storage, and transport’

·    Compliance training

·    GPS and MapInfo training

·    General Computer training

·    Relevant pest management conferences and workshops

MRC (LLO)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On-going

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No. of courses and conferences attended.

 

Number of current pest management competency standards held by the LLO.

 

 

 

 

 

Availability of Information

To make readily available to all stakeholders data on the distribution, abundance and current management status of pests.

On the Maranoa Regional Council web site provide:

·    the Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan

·    links to DEEDI web site (includes current state wide knowledge of the distribution of pests)

 

MRC (LLO)

2010

Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan and links to DEEDI website able to be accessed on the Maranoa Regional Council web site.

Digitally record and continually update all known locations of priority pests identified in this Plan within the Shire using Map info and periodically provide this information to BSQ.

Link the Maranoa Regional Council website to the BSQ website, pest information and maps.

MRC (LLO)  & IT

 

On-going

BSQ  maps showing the distribution of pests that include update data from the Maranoa Regional Council.

 


Desired Outcome Two:

     

All Stakeholders are committed to and undertake coordinated management of pest weeds and animals

Success Criteria:

·    Number of stakeholders working in partnership on long-term pest management.

·    Extent to which stakeholders comply with and enforce the Act.

 

 
 


State Principles:

·    Commitment

·    Consultation and Partnership

 

Issue

Strategic Objective

 

Strategic Actions

Who

When

Success Indicators

Long term commitment

Establish long term commitment with stakeholders in pest plant and animal management.

 

Establish partnerships with key stakeholders to undertake strategic actions identified within this Plan.

MRC (LLO)

2010

No. of partnerships established.

Maintain a working group of key stakeholders to review Maranoa Regional Council’s Pest Management Plan.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

Working group established and meets once per year.

Continue co-ordinated pest management programs across Local Government boundaries to reduce and or eliminate identified species where possible

 

All LG’s

QPWS

DEEDI

On-going

No. of co-ordinated pest management programs undertaken per annum

Continue to support the Queensland Parks & Wildlife Service in coordinated control of pest animals and or plants within national parks and state forests located in this region.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

A-line coordinated pest animal/plant mitigation programs for state and privately owned land to ensure infestation can not move across the landscape. 

Compliance and Enforcement

Enforce compliance with relevant Acts dealing with the management of pest plants and animals.

Maintain a register of notices issued to land managers and other enforcement activities.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of compliance notices issued.

 

Percentage of compliance with first and second notices issued.


 

Desired Outcome Three:

Reliable information is available as a basis for decision-making

Success Criteria:

·    The extent to which data is collected and used in pest management.

·    The level of stakeholder understanding of pest biology, ecology and impacts (including the costs of action and non-action)

·    The extent to which the community attitudes to pest management are understood.

 
 


State Principles:

·    Improvement

 

 

 

 

Issue

Strategic Objective

 

Strategic Actions

Who

When

Success Indicators

Data collection and assessment

To collect, use, and make available to all stakeholders data relevant to weed and pest animal management.

Map high priority pest plants and animals and contribute this information to the BSQ Pestinfo data base.

MRC (LLO) & IT

On-going

Amount of information from Maranoa Regional Council included on PestInfo

Develop and use monitoring guidelines and field evaluation record sheets.  Continually monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of control activities (eg. result of spraying “x” priority pest plant).

BSQ

 

MRC (LLO)

2010

 

On-going

Percentage of pest control activities for which monitoring and evaluation data is recorded.

Pest biology and pest impacts

To further the understanding of the biology, ecology and impacts of pest animals and plants.

Consider pest behaviour (biology and ecology), pest impacts (economic, social, and environmental), and pest control costs in the local declaration and prioritization of pest species

 

On-going

Percentage of priority pests determined with reference to available information on behavior, impacts, and control costs

Support, and/or in partnership with, neighbouring Shires, regional groups and state government develop projects to determine the ecology (where required) and local and regional impact of high priority pest animals and plants.

 

2010

No. of projects developed, implemented and their outcomes.

Community attitudes

To further the understanding of community attitudes to weed and pest animal management

Where possible, support regional organizations and state government departments to gather information on community awareness and attitudes about pest animals and plants.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of requests made by regional organizations and state departments to Council and no. of requests fulfilled.

 

2.4       Desired Outcome Four:

Strategic directions are established, maintained and owned by all stakeholders

Success Criteria:

·    The number of pest management plans at different levels incorporated into the planning framework

·    The degree of coordination in implementing, evaluating and reviewing pest management plans

·    The proportion of pest management actions that are adequately resourced

·    The extent to which pest management actions are integrated with planning at different levels

 

 
 


State Principles:

·    Planning

·    Integration

 

 

 

 

Issue

 

Strategic Objective

Strategic Actions

Who

When

Success Indicators

Planning

To create a planning framework for pest plant and animal management

Ensure that the Maranoa Regional Council  Pest Management Plan is consistent with regional and state pest strategies and plans

PWG?

On-going

No inconsistencies between plans

Strategy management and coordination

To implement, evaluate, and review integrated weed and pest animal strategies

Review the annual action plan three months before the end of each financial year

PWG?

Yearly

Percentage of annual action programs given timely review

Complete each new Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan three months before the expiry of its predecessor

PWG?

Every 4 years

Completion of new Pest Management Plan prior to expiry of predecessor

Implement actions of priority pest plant and animal actions identified within the Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan.

     MRC (LLO), BSQ & IT

On-going

Percentage of actions implemented.

Participate in the development of regional pest plant and animal management plans, workshops and actions, as appropriate and where funding / resources permits (ie. for across shire or similar issues). 

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of pest management activities being addressed regionally by local governments.

No. of regional activities Maranoa Regional Council is involved in.


Desired Outcome Four con’t…

 

Issue

 

Strategic Objective

Strategic Actions

Who

When

Success Indicators

Resources

To efficiently and adequately resource weed and pest animal management

Commit to adequately resourcing the Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Strategy focusing on high priority pests.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

Percentage of this Plan adequately resourced and implemented.

Percentage of resources allocated according to pest priorities.

In partnership with other local governments within the region initiate a review of local government precepts payable for the Barrier Fence.

Continue to submit the local government precept to the Minister of Natural Resources for the Barrier Fence.

Continue to submit the precept fees for research purpose.

MRC (LLO)

2010

Precepts reviewed.

Precepts paid.

Seek funding and other resources wherever possible to implement  actions within the Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

Resources (actual dollars and in-kind) obtained from non-local government sources.

Establish fair and equitable rates and charge fees to private landowners for pest management services undertaken by Maranoa Regional Council.

MRC (LLO)

2010 reviewed annually

Value of income derived from service provision versus expenses of work undertaken.

Determine fees for undertaking pest control actions on private property by delegated officers of Council

MRC (LLO)

2010

Cost recovery.

 


Desired Outcome Four con’t…

 

Issue

 

Strategic Objective

Strategic Actions

Who

When

Success Indicators

Holistic Management

To integrate pest management planning with other government, property, community and industry planning

Include pest management actions in other Maranoa Regional Council planning documents and new development applications (including preventing weed, seed spread, eradicating high priority weeds on new development sites, planting non-invasive species).

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of pest management actions included in other Maranoa Regional Council planning documents and new development applications.

 

 

Encourage regional natural resource management groups to incorporate pest management as an integral component of all property land management-planning processes (eg. sub-catchment planning, property planning, environmental management systems etc).

MRC (LLO)

QMDC

On-going

Record of support provided by Maranoa Regional Council.

 

 

Have all Mining, Service and other relevant companies and their contractors adopt the shire’s weed management plans as part of current recommended practices.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

Record of support provided by Maranoa Regional Council.

 

 

Ask Mining and Service companies to submit their environmental management plans to Council for review, compliance and comment.

MRC

Annual

No. of plans supplied to Council that meet the requirements of this regions plan

 

 

 


 

2.5       Desired Outcome Five:

Introduction, spread and establishment of weeds and pest animals is prevented

Success Criteria:

·    The extent to which the introduction of new pests is prevented

·    The extent to which the local establishment of new pests is prevented

·    The extent to which pests are prevented from spreading

 
 


State Principles:

·    Prevention

 

 

 

Issue

Strategic Objective

Strategic Actions

Who

When

Success Indicators

Prevention

Prevent the introduction of new pest plants and animals

Adopt weed prevention protocols and promote the use of these protocols to other stakeholders.

MRC (LLO)

2010

Percentage of key stakeholders using weed prevention protocols

In consultation with neighbouring local governments, weed management groups, BSQ and industry, review existing weed hygiene declarations as appropriate and include these declarations as a requirement of the permit application for travelling and agistment stock.

 

MRC (LLO)

2010

A weed hygiene declaration is obtained for all stock agisted or travelling the stock route.  No. of forms provided to Council

Promote weed hygiene declarations for movement of harvesting, construction, and other industry related equipment, as well as, the movement of fodder, soil and turf.

MRC (LLO)

 

On-going

Industry identified as high percentage of key stakeholders - using weed hygiene declarations.

Develop a standard code of practice to minimise weed seed spread associated with any civil construction work undertaken by Maranoa Regional Council and outside contractors to Maranoa Regional Council (including on existing and new developments). 

 

MRC (LLO) Civil Services

2010

Code of practice produced and adhered to.

 

No. of infrastructure development contracts that include weed prevention codes.


Desired Outcome Five Con’t…

 

Issue

 

Strategic Objective

Strategic Actions

Who

When

Success Indicators

Prevention con’t…

Prevent the introduction of new pest plants and animals con’t…

 

 

 

 

Early detection and eradication

 

Target pests identified for “early detection and eradication” in Section 3.0 of this Plan.

 

MRC (LLO)

On-going

Change in distribution of pests identified for “early detection and eradication” within the Maranoa Regional Council

Conduct seasonal surveys of road sides and other critical areas within Maranoa Regional Council for pest plants and animals

 

MRC (LLO)

On-going

Encourage landholders to provide Council with mapping details of high priority pests through industry, sub-catchment and producer groups.

 

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of pest sites identified by landholders and sent to Council

Develop a weed seed spread code of conduct for travelling stock, giving consideration to a “go slow zone” to limit the spread of weed seed as required.

 

MRC (LLO)

2010

New weed seeds along the stock route restricted to “go slow zone”


 

Desired Outcome Five con’t…

 

Issue

 

Strategic Objective

Strategic Actions

Who

When

Success Indicators

Containment

Contain and reduce priority pest infestations within the Maranoa Regional Council

 

Target pests identified for “containment” in Section 3.0 of this Plan and development containment strategies/plans for these pests.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

Change in distribution of pests identified for “containment” within Maranoa Regional Council

Support rapid response agreements signed off by Maranoa regional Council with neighbouring Councils.

 

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of responses associated with the rapid response agreement/s

Respond to landholder complaints promptly by providing processes that can be implemented to reduce infestation.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of complaints received

Contain Class 2 pests to core areas.

 

MRC (LLO)

On-going

Change in distribution of Class 2 pests

 

 


2.6       Desired Outcome Six:

 

Integrated systems for managing the impacts of established weeds and pest animals are developed and widely implemented

 

Success Criteria:

·    The extent to which best practice is adopted

·    The extent to which the populations and impacts of established pests are reduced

·    The degree of protection afforded to environmentally significant areas by weed management programs

·    The extent to which local pest management practices are developed and improved

·    The extent to which incentives enhance pest management

 
State Principles:

·    Best practice

·    Improvement

·    Commitment

 

 

 

 

 

Issue

Strategic Objective

Strategic Actions

Who

When

Success Indicators

Adoption of management techniques

Adopt and promote best practice in weed and pest animal management

Encourage industry, government and community groups to support the implementation of the Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan within their own programs.

 

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of programs that refer to or incorporate actions from this Plan

Support BSQ to distribute best practice publications to relevant stakeholders.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of requests from QDEEDI and no. implemented

Consider timing, integrated techniques, non-target damage, cost, prevention, animal welfare, workplace health and safety, monitoring, research, operational procedures and chemical registration requirements in planning.

PWG?

On-going

No. of complaints

 

 

Develop a working group with none traditional grazing/farming landowners (eg Mining Companies) to implement best practice pest management control actions

BSO

MRC

Mining Co

 

Ongoing

No. of improved pest management practices


Desired Outcome Six con’t…

 

Issue

Strategic Objective

Strategic Actions

Who

When

Success Indicators

Population and impact management

Reduce pest populations and impacts

Participate in the coordination of plague pest animal management with all stakeholders and support the lead agency, as appropriate.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

Amount and type of support provided

No. of complaints

Conduct coordinated baiting campaigns for wild dogs.

MRC (LLO)

Twice a year

No. of landholders participating and area land and location covered

Environmentally significant areas

Protect environmentally significant areas from weeds

Regularly monitor environmental significant areas for pests identified within Maranoa Regional Council’s Stock Route Management Plan and develop appropriate management plans as required (giving consideration to developing partnership agreements with other key stakeholders and accessing non local government resource support)

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of significant areas targeted for pest management

No. of pest management plans for significant areas implemented

Development of management practices

Develop new, and improve existing, pest plant and animal management practices

Advise regional pest / natural resource management groups of areas in which future research is required to help manage pest plants and animals within the Maranoa Regional Council.

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of regional pest / natural resource management groups attended

Incentives

To offer incentives to stakeholders for practising pest management

Monitor effectiveness of wild dog bonus payments made to person/s. 

 

Provision of some meat to landholders for baiting programs

 

Council encourage and work cooperatively with landholders to implement best practice and carry out actions to eradicate or reduce pests within the Shire.

 

Hire of MRC spray equipment to landholders in the control of weeds

 

Investigate other incentive options?

MRC (LLO)

 

MRCWDAG member

2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

Number of complaints and sightings advised to Council/Wild dog advisory group.

 

Number of landholders ordering meat for baiting programs

 

Number of landholders using hire equipment

 

No. of reports presented to Council


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

3.0       Priority Pest Species

 

This Section begins by listing all pests identified as impacting or having the potential to impact upon industry within the Maranoa Regional Council areas, associated community and environmental systems.  

 

The “local distribution” information provided in Section 3.2 and 3.3 only relates to land within the Shire managed by Council and does not include freehold or leasehold land, national parks, state forests and other land managed by the state.

 

For each pest their declaration status, current level of impact, control information, distribution and density was identified and considered to determine an appropriate achievable management objective.  The management objectives were denoted as follows:

 

A.   Prevention of introduction (exclusion from entering the Shire)

B.   Early detection and eradication – eradication of isolated, strategic infestations/populations

C.  Containment – within specific areas

D.  Broad scale management with biological control or fire/protection of strategic areas

E.   Technical Advices/Promote Awareness

 

Using a matrix methodology each pest was then given a very high, high, medium or low priority rating based on the potential detrimental impact to the region if nothing was done to control the pest and the likely impact gained by doing something or spending money now.

 

 

Likely impact gained by doing something/spending money now

Potential detrimental impact to the Shire of not doing anything to control the pest

 

 

Low

Moderate

High

Very High

Low

Very Low

Low

Low

Low

 

Moderate

Low

Low

Moderate

High

 

High

Low

Moderate

High

Very High

 

Very High

Low

High

Very High

Extreme

 

The known distribution of the individual species was described and recorded with the following table.  It was also agreed weed maps produced by DEEDI should be included in the document along with the Priority Weed Threat Map produced by the Queensland Murray-Darling Committee.

 

 

 

3.1       Classification

 

A number of pest plants and animals are declared under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002.  These plants are listed (Schedule 2 of the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Regulation 2003) and categoriised into three separate classes as outlined in Section 3.1.1 below.

 

In addition to this classification Maranoa Regional Council gives an additional priority rating of “high”, “medium” or “low” to each pest animal and plant based on the current and potential impact of the pest within the Shire, where greater resources and attention is given to higher priority pests. 

 

 

 

3.1.1    State

 

A Class 1 pest is one not commonly present in Queensland that is, if introduced, would cause an adverse economic, environmental, or social impact. Class 1 pests established in Queensland are subject to eradication from the state. Landholders must take reasonable steps to keep land free of Class 1 pests.  Other powers of the Act apply.  For example, Class 1 animals can be kept only under permit.

 

Class 2 pests are established in Queensland and have, or could have, an adverse economic, environmental or social impact. Their management and control requires coordination and they are subject to existing programs. They may also be new pests requiring state coordination, and subject to local government, community or landholder-led programs.  Landholders must take reasonable steps to keep land free of Class 2 pests. Other powers of the Act apply.

 

The declaration of Class 3 pests took effect on 1 November 2003. These plant species are established in Queensland and have, or could have, an adverse economic, environmental, or social impact. Their impact is primarily environmental. A pest control notice for Class 3 pests can be issued only for land that is, or is adjacent to, an environmentally significant area.  Only some of the other powers of the Act apply.

3.1      


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

3.2    Pest Plants

Within the following tables the local distribution only relates to land within the Shire managed by Council and does not include freehold or leasehold land, national parks, state forests and other land managed by the state.

 

Pest – Common and Scientific Names

Declaration Status

(e.g. Class 1,2,3)

Level of Impacts/Threats (potential and actual)

(e.g. Environment, Primary Industry, Social, Amenity etc)

Distribution and Density

Achievability or Mangement Objectives

Priority

African Boxthorn

Lycium ferocissimum      

Class 2

Invades pastures and provides harbourage for pest animals

Isolated – water course & adjacent areas

C-Containment

High

African Love Grass

Eragrostis curvula           

Not Declared

Produces vast quantities of seeds which quickly develop into large viable seed bank, making the plant difficult to eradicate. It is extremely competitive with other pasture species and is an aggressive invader, overtaking sparse, overgrazed or poor quality pastures, particularly in sandy soils.

Infestation increasing – light sandy soils, main roads, Yuleba Forestry camp, railway line, Condamine/Carnarvon Highway cross roads, Eastern end of Condamine Highway

E. Promote awareness

Moderate

Bathurst Burr

Zanthium spinosum                 

Not Declared

Contaminates wool and competes with summer crops.

Scattered throughout

E. Promote awareness

Low

Cats Claw Vine

Macfadyena unguis-cati      

Class 3

Invades waterways and choke out native vegetation

Bungil Creek, Yalebone Creek and urban gardens

B. Early detection & eradication

High to Very High

Cotton Tail

Froelichia floridana     

 

           

Not Declared

Competes with pasture.

Lighter soils throughout the Shire

Provide technical advice when required

Eradicate small new infestations

Low

Cumbungi

Typha spp.                              

Not Declared

Invasive

Water storage areas

E. Technical advise

Low

Fire Weed

Senecio madagascariensis    

Class 2

Competes with pasture and is toxic to stock

No known population of this introduced species

A. Prevention of introduction

Very High

Giant Rat’s Tail Grass

Sporobolus pyramidalis and             S. natalensis                   

Class 2

Aggressive plant reduces pasture productivity and quickly out competes desirable pasture species.

Isolated patch – Pony Hills State Forest, Yellowbank Gas camp

B. Eradicate

High

Pest – Common and Scientific Names

Declaration Status

(e.g. Class 1,2,3 local law)

Level of Impacts/Threats (potential and actual)

(e.g. Environment, Primary Industry, Social, Amenity etc)

Distribution and Density

Achievability or Mangement Objectives

Priority

Green Cestrum

Cestrum parqui                       

Not Declared

Competes for pasture and toxic to stock

Bungil Creek – 10km radius Roma Town

C. Containment

High

Harrisia Cactus

Eriocereus spp                      

Class 2

Strongly competes with pasture and toxic to stock

West Mitchell on Warrego Highway & adjacent paddocks

Jackson 3km radius, Yuleba North Road (14km), St.George Middle Road, 30km south of Surat off the Carnarvon Highway

C. Containment

Very High

Honey Locust

Gleditsia triacanthos             

Class 1

Invasive tree that smothers pasture and native vegetation, inflicts painful injuries with long spines. Can rapidly form dense thickets restricting stock, vehicle and human movement.

Very isolated plants

B. Eradication

Very High

Lantana

Lantana camara              

Class 3

Fast growing shrub resulting in severe impacts to native species.

Balonne River, Nth Wallumbilla, Pine Hills Road, Isolated patches, Bungewogari Lane, urban gardens

B. Early detection and eradication

 Very High

Lippia

Phyla canescens             

Not Declared

Strong competitor with pasture, especially in Riparian areas. Located in urban gardens

Through out Shire

E. Technical advise

Low

Mesquite

Prosopis glandulosa, P. pallid and    P. velutina                         

Class 2

Sharp thorns can injure animals and puncture vehicle tyres. Seeds can lay dormant for years and seedlings can reappear in areas that have previously been cleared.

Yuleba Forestry and may be identified along artillery roads and highways

B. Early detection and eradication

Very High

Mimosa

Acacia farnesiana                

Not Declared

Competes with pasture.

Throughout

E. Technical advise

Low

Mother of Millions

Bryophyllum spp                   

Class 2

Poisonous to stock

Throughout

C.Containment D.  Broad scale management with biological control fire/protection of strategic areas

High

Noogoora Burr

Xanthium occidentale    

Not Declared

Competes with pasture especially in riparian zones. Toxic to stock

Throughout

D. Biological control

Low

Pest – Common and Scientific Names

Declaration Status

(e.g. Class 1,2,3 local law)

Level of Impacts/Threats (potential and actual)

(e.g. Environment, Primary Industry, Social, Amenity etc)

Distribution and Density

Achievability or Mangement Objectives

Priority

Parkinsonia

Parkinsonia aculeate      

Class 2

Forms dense, often impenetrable, thorny thickets along water courses and bore drains, restricts stock access to drinking water and makes mustering virtually impossible

Provides a harbour for feral pigs, which predate on livestock, damage crops, and seriously degrade the environment, flooded country is particularly susceptible to invasion from floating seeds

Isolated – Dargal Road 5km from Roma, Roma Saleyards, 5km West Roma, Yalebone Creek junction of Dunkeld Road

B. Early detection and Eradication

High

Parthenium

Parthenium hysterphorus      

Class 2

Vigorous species that colonies pasture’s and reduces pasture potential, can cause health problems due to allergic properties, toxic to stock.

Scattered throughout – heavy infestation to north and medium to west and south west

B. Early detection and eradication of new outbreaks. C. Containment for the rest of the Shire

Very High new outbreaks

 

High

Pimelea

Pimelea elongate                 

Not Declared

Poisonous to stock, native plant numerous species

Throughout

E. Technical advise

Low

Prickly Acacia

Acacia nilotica                 

Class 2

Affects accessibility to land, depletes pasture when canopy is formed

Scattered along main artillary roads

60 Km south Roma off Bullagai Road

B. Early detection and eradicate

High

Prickly Pear

Opuntia spp              

Class 2

Completes strongly with pasture

Scattered throughout

D. Biological control

Low

Rubber Vine

Cryptostegia grandifilora   

Class 1

Invades waterways and smothers riparian vegetation. Poisonous to stock and harbourage for declared animals

Isolated urban plants

B. Early detection and eradication

High

Saffron Thistle

Carthamus lanatus           

Not Declared

Competes with pasture, common in cultivated land.

Scattered throughout

E. Technical advise

Low

Salvinia

Salvinia molesta                         

Class 1

Invades and chokes waterways displacing native species

not detected within the Region

A. Prevention of introduction

High

Thornapples

Datura spp.                   

Not Declared

Competes with pasture and poisonous to stock

Scattered throughout – waterways and cultivation

E. Technical advise

Low

Tiger Pear

Opuntia aurantiaca        

Not Declared

Impediment to native species and stock, competes with pasture

Scattered along Ripirian, thick along Dawson River

E. Technical advise,           

D. Broadscale management, biological control.

Low

Pest – Common and Scientific Names

Declaration Status

(e.g. Class 1,2,3 local law)

Level of Impacts/Threats (potential and actual)

(e.g. Environment, Primary Industry, Social, Amenity etc)

Distribution and Density

Achievability or Mangement Objectives

Priority

Tree Pear                           

Not Declared

Impediment to native species and stock, competes with pasture

Scattered throughout

D. Broadscale management, biological control.

Low

Devils Rope Pear

 

Class 2

Impediment to native species animals and humans, competes with pasture, will inundate land

 60km east of Surat along the Balonne River and on Yuleba Creek near old School

B. Early detection and eradication

Very High

Water Hyacinth

Eichhornia crassipes          

Class 2

Chokes waterways, destroys native habitat, increases water loss  and depletes water of oxygen

Roma - Railway Dam – monitor

B. Early detection and eradication

Very High

Water Lettuce

Pistia stratiotes                

Class 2

Forms dense mats on water restricting flow, increase water loss by transpiration and serve as a breeding ground for mosquitoes

Roslyn Drive

B. Early detection and eradication

 High

Mexican Feather Grass

Class 1

Heavy infestations displace desirable pasture species, decreases pasture productivity, long sharp seeds injure animals downgrading meat, wool and hides (leather), reduces natural biodiversity

 

 

Has been eradicate – Surat School and urban land Charles Street Surat

A. Prevention of Introduction

High

Chilean Needle Grass

Class 1

 

Not currently detected in Region

A.   Prevention of Introduction

High

 

 

 

3.1.1   


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

3.2.1    Priority of Pest Plants – Management Objective and Control Method

 

The following table provides a summary of all pests identified as ‘high’ priority providing management objective and control method.  Annual Pest Plans reflect those species identified as ‘high’ priority due to resource constraints.

 

For the purpose of the Annual Pest Plan (Section 4.0) those high priority plants and animals with the same management objective have been grouped together.  This is because the actions and measures of success will be similar.  Within each of these broader management objective groups some specific treatments or actions for individual pests are also identified.

 

 

Plant Name

Management Objective

Control Method

Parthenium

Early detection

Containment

·      Pastures to be maintained in good condition – high level of grass crown cover will limit parthenium weed colonisation

·      Avoid overgrazing of pastures

·      Fence off infested areas to prevent stock grazing, allow more flexible management such as spelling pasture or herbicide application

·      Herbicide control – small and or isolated infestations treted immediately, extensive infestations will require herbicide treatment in conjunction with pasture management.  Timing of spraying is critical so parthenium weed is removed when plants are small or before seeding has occurred.

·      Some registered herbicides include: Amicide 625, 2/4-D amine, atrazine, Tordon 75-D, Metsulfuron

·      Vehicles and implements passing through infested areas should be cleaned to remove all seeds (prevent weed seed spread).  The clean down area should be confined to one area for monitoring and eradication of new plants.  Obtain weed seed hygiene declaration form

·      Avoid moving cattle from infested to clean areas during rain events.  Cattle should be held in a yard or small paddock until seed has dropped (tails, hide hair etc) before releasing animals to larger grazing area.

·      When purchasing hay, seed or other fodder material, ensure the product is parthenium weed free.

Harrisia Cactus

Containment

·      Spray plant with registered herbicide – Metsulfuron, DP 600, Access and Tordon DSH

·      Biological control – stem boring longicorns beetle (Alcidion cereicola) and mealy bug (Hypogeococcus festerianus).

·      Dig plants out (including bulb in roots) and burn

Rope Pear

Containment

·      Spray plant thoroughly to ground level with registered herbicide – Access

·      Biological control – cochineal insect however these must be protected in winter and during wet weather.

 

Plant Name

Management Objective

Control Method

African Boxthorn

Containment

·      Cut stump or basal bark – do not treat during dormant winter months

·      Foliar spray – using Grazon DS

·      Use Glyphosate on small plants

·      Roundup – Foliar spray after good soaking rains – plants must be actively growing

·      Mechanical eradication can be implemented on large stands – blade ploughing and stick raking or removing entire root system and burn plant complete

Green Cestrum

Containment

·      Access – basal bark or cut stump and apply chemical

·      Glyphosate – apply chemical to cut stump

·      Tordon 75-D and Amitrole T – foliar spray actively growing plants to eliminate flowers and berries

·      Seedlings can be suppressed by vigorous competition from other plant pasture species or local native species

·      Removal of plant and root system can be done, however root system is very complex – need to remove all yellow roots – burning of roots is advisable.  Please note that dried plant matter is toxic to stock.

Cats Claw Vine

B. Early detection and eradication

·      Glyphosate – cut stump just above ground level and apply chemical on cut stump.  Foliar spray when plant is actively growing – need to retreat as necessary

Mesquite

B. Early detection and eradication

·      Access and Garlon 600 – basal bark or cut stump and treat with chemical

·      Grazon DS – foliar spray for seedlings or regrowth

Lantana

B. Early detection and eradication

Mechanical, Biological and chemical control methods can be implemented.

·      Large infestations – fire, dozing-stickraking and cutting stump apply chemical (Access)

·      Lantana DP600, Glyphosate, Grazon DS, Metsulfuron, Starane 200, Tordon 75-D – foliar spray ensure plants are wet thoroughly – plants should be actively growing or not under stress when applying such chemicals.  Large bush may need re-treatment

·      Amicide 625 – use a coarse spray with sufficient pressure to penetrate canopy and wet stems as well as foliage

Salvinia

A. Prevention of introduction

Can be sprayed with herbicide, results can be variable as upper leaf surfaces are largely non-wettable making absorption of herbicide difficult.  Large infestations may be gathered with mechanical harvesters and scoops although effectiveness of this method is liminted as the plant breaks easily into fragments.

·      AF100 – lightly spray free floating plants and adjacent water surface

·      Reglone – thoroughly saturate plants

Parkinsonia

B. Early detection and eradication

·      Mechanical control – blade ploughing

·      Chemical control – basal bark or cut stump technique, foliar spraying

·      Fire kills seedlings and seeds and is an excellent form of follow up control

Plant Name

Management Objective

Control Method

Prickly Acacia

B. Early detection and eradication

Control of prickly acacia can be achieved with an integrated approach using mechanical, chemical and biological methods.  Fire and pasture management can complement these treatments – variables to be considered when determining control methods – location, size and density of infestation, landform, timing of control, available resources.

 

Mechanical control – to be conducted before the seed pods are dropped – permits may be required if native plants are affected.  Plants with truck diameter less than 150mm can be grubbed, cutting the root to at least 300 mm below the soil surface to prevent regeneration – tractor fitted with a scoop or grubbing attachment is useful for this purpose.

 

Basal bark spray method is suitable for stems up to 100mm in diameter.  Stem should be sprayed completely around the base up to a height of 300mm above ground, wetting the bark to the point of run-off.  Most effective between April and August.

 

Cut stump and apply chemical technique may be used at any time of the year.  Foliar or overall spraying is effective on seedlings and young plants up to 2m in height.

Giants Rat’s Tail Grass

B. Early detection and eradication

ALERT – Early identification is essential – contact DEEDI or your LG if you suspect a plant within this Shire. 

Glyphosate – spot spray

Water Lettuce

B. Early detection and eradication

Weedmaster Duo – helicopter application

Affray 300 – (Boom spray) sprinkle onto free-floating plants and adjacent water surface

AF 100 – spot spray.  Don not spray dense solid mats with no visible water surface

Rubber Vine

B. Early detection and eradication

Grazon DS – foliar spray

2,4-D Ester – foliar spray and basal bark, cut stump

Brush-off/BrushkillerTM600 and wetting agent – complete coverage is essential

2,4-D Amine – cut stump – repeat applications maybe required

Water Hyacinth

B. Early detection and eradication

Weedmaster Duo – foliar spray do not treat in winter

2,4-D Amine – foliar spray do not treat in winter

AF300/Afray300 – foliar spray

Honey Locust

B. Early detection and eradication

Access – Basal bark or cut stump

Starane 200 – basal bark - read chemical label for different tree trunk size and alternate application method

Chilean Needle Grass

A. Prevention of introduction

Manual removal most effective – remove any basal or stem seeds and incinerated prior to plants dry out.

Mowing or slashing – narrow window of opportunity to implement this process, no mowing of plant after flowering. 

Fire can be used when plant in full seed.  Will reduce new seedling growth, however will promote seed located in soil.

Chemicals

Flupropanate – ground and aerial application and spot spraying

Glyphosate – boom or spot spraying

Plant Name

Management Objective

Control Method

Fire Weed

A. Prevention of introduction

2,4-D (625g/L) – spot spraying only

Aminopyralid (10g/L) + fluroxpyr (333g/L) Apply as a high volume or spot spray to flowering plants up to 30cm tall

Triclopyr (300g/L)+ picloram (100g/L) + aminopyralid (10g/L) Apply as a high volume or spot spray when the plant is actively flowering

Bromoxynil (200g/L) Apply during the autumn/sinter period when plants are young and actively growing.  Not effective on mature plants

Mother of Millions

Containment

2,4-D acid (AF300) Overall spray handgun/knapsack

Picloram + triclopyr – Overall spray knapsack – apply at flowering

 

 

 

3.1   


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

 

3.3       Pest Animals

 

 

 

Pest – Common and Scientific Names

Declaration Status

(e.g. Class 1,2,3 Local Law)

Level of Impacts/Threats (potential and actual)

(e.g. Environment, Primary Industry, Social, Amenity etc)

Distribution and Density

Achievability or Mangement Objectives

Priority

Carp

Cyprinus carpio          

Class 2

Noxious species

Competes with native species

Throughout waterways

E. Promote Awareness, Technical advise

Low

Dingo / Wild Dog

Canis familiaris dingo / Canis familiaris                        

Class 2

Kill, harass and maim stock. Carrier of disease

Throughout the region

D. Broadscale Management of strategic areas

High

 

Feral Cat

Felis silvestvis; Felis catus 

Class 2

Impact on native species

Throughout the region

D. Broadscale Management

Low

 

Feral Goat

Capra hircus                     

Class 2

Damage to pasture, crops and infrastructure . Carrier of disease

Throughout – southwest of Shire

D. Broadscale Management

Low

Feral Pig

Sus scrofa                         

Class 2

Damage to pasture, crops and infrastructure. Carrier of disease

Throughout the region

D. Broadscale Management

Moderate

Fox

Vulpes vulpes                    

Class 2

Kill stock, small mammals, frogs, fish and native ground-dwelling animals

Throughout the Region

D. Broadscale Management

Moderate

Locusts

Chortoicetus terminifera, Locusta migratoria, Austracris guttulosa 

Class 2

Can significantly reduce the quantity of pasture and crops

Seasonal – throughout the region

B. Early detection and eradication

High

Mice

Mus domesticus                  

Not Declared

Damage to crops and property

Seasonal – throughout the Region

E. Technical Advise  Promote awareness      D. Broadscale Management for crop areas

Low

Pest – Common and Scientific Names

Declaration Status

(e.g. Class 1,2,3 Local Law)

Level of Impacts/Threats (potential and actual)

(e.g. Environment, Primary Industry, Social, Amenity etc)

Distribution and Density

Achievability or Mangement Objectives

Priority

Rabbit

Oryctolagus cuniculus        

Class 2

Causes soil erosion and competes with native species

Throughout the Region

D. Broadscale Management

High

Hare

 

 

Throughout the Region

D. Broadscale Managment

Low

Wild  Horse

Not Declared

Damage to native grasses and biodiversity, soil erosion and land degradation from over grazing

North west of Shire – State Land

C. Containment

High

 Deer

(Hog and Rusa)

Not declared

Damage to native grasses and biodiversity, soil erosion and land degradation from over grazing

Isolated pockets – north Roma, west Mitchell

B. Early detection and eradication

Moderate


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

3.3.1    High Priority Pest Animals –Control Methods and Management Objectives

 

Animal Name

Management Objective

Control Method

Locust

E. Technical Advise  Promote awareness      D. Broadscale Management for crop areas

The ability of locusts to invade previously uninfested areas and lay eggs within days, combined with the mobility of flying swarms, makes swarm control particularly difficult for individual landholders. Locust control is usually best carried out at the hopper stage. Currently, the most cost-effective way to achieve control is by spraying the densest concentrations of locusts, either as bands or swarms. The Australian Plague Locust Commission is researching control techniques to reduce non-target impacts of chemical control.

Mice

D. Broadscale Management

Landholders must work collaboratively to eradicate this pest animal in grain growing areas.  Use of manufactured baits is essential to protect grain.

Rabbit

D. Broadscale Management

An integrated control approach should be adopted. It is important landholders understand that biological control agents are not the sole answer to the rabbit problem. It is essential they are incorporated into a management strategy with other control techniques. Destroying a rabbit’s home (eg. fumigating and ripping warrens) is the most effective method for long-term control. Other control methods include Myxomatosis, baiting with 1080 or pindone, rabbit proof fencing, clearing surface cover, fumigating warrens, shooting and trapping.

Wild Dog

D. Broadscale Management – aim is to contain and or reduce wild dog numbers

·    1080 baits are the most economic, efficient, humane and effective method of controlling wild dogs, especially in inaccessible or extensive areas. Baits can be laid in large numbers by hand, from vehicles and or from aircraft. 1080 can only be obtained through licensed NRM&W and Local Government operators. To increase baiting effectiveness and maintain low wild dog numbers, it is essential that baiting programs be coordinated among adjoining properties disregarding local government boundaries and landholders work together to achieve this goal.

·    Integrated (with baiting) wild dog control:

Shot - which is opportunistic and mostly used for the control of small populations.

Trapped – which can be time-consuming, labour-intensive and depends on the skill of the trap operator.

Fenced out – this can be an expensive process and requires continual maintenance to repair damage caused by fallen timber, floods and animals. For fencing to be successful, it must be possible to eliminate wild dogs from within the fence.

Livestock guardian dogs – less successful on larger holdings where stock are more widely scattered and has the potential to restrict the use of traps and baits.

Wild Horse

Containment

Council to work with DERM to control wild horses on public land – Carnarvon National Park


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

 

4.0 HIGH PRIORITY PESTS - ANNUAL WORK PLAN

 

Resources to manage pests are limited. Consequently actions associated with high priority

pests will be implemented first. Other actions will be implemented as resources become

available.

 

Prevention is generally recognised as a more cost effective method than containment or

eradication.  Consequently Maranoa Regional Council also places high priority on actions associated with hygiene management and awareness.

 

The following “general” actions relate to all high priority plant pests outlined in Sections

4.1 to 4.20.

 

Operational Action

Who

When

Success Indicator

 

Conduct regular general inspections and control on roadsides and reserves

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of inspections /year

 

Continue to monitor areas potentially at risk of new

infestations and treat any new infestations found. Work with DEEDI officers to ensure pests mapping is current

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of new

infestations found and

treated

Update mapping annually

 

Hygiene Management:

·    Implement day-to-day hygiene management

·    Identify potential pest plant entry points on land managed by Maranoa Regional Council.

·    Establish property / site hygiene plans, as required.

·    Require a written weed hygiene declaration for any material, stock and vehicles (eg. seed, hay or other stock feed) bought / used within lands managed by Maranoa Regional Council.

·    Regularly inspect and wash down vehicles and

equipment used or contracted by Maranoa Regional Council, as required.

·    Monitor high traffic roadways and tracks

·    Monitor washdown facility sites to identify if, (i) upgrades needed for existing facilities and (ii) the requirements for new facilities. Should facilities be recommended for Maranoa Regional Council investigate funding opportunities and partnerships to build them.

 

MRC (LLO)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MRC (LLO)

 

 

On-going

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On-going

 

Hygiene code

produced

Entry points included

in code

Critical areas

identified in code

Regular vehicle

inspections for weed

seed spread

undertaken

Location or spread of

pests

Maintain current washdown facilities to user friendly efficient standard, work in collaboration with DEEDI to develop any new strategic sites – Roma Saleyard Site.

 

 

Awareness

·    Raise community awareness of pest plants by way of brochures, displays and other means.

·    In conjunction with DEEDI collate and distribute best practice information to landowners / managers, including maintaining good pasture competition by implementing sound land use management practices.

 

BSQ

MRC (LLO)

MRC Working Group

Yearly

 

 

 

Yearly

 

No. of  regional pest plant booklets distributed.

 

No. of ‘pest fact sheets’ distributed

Pest Management Plan 2010 - 1014

 

Operational Action

Who

When

Success Indicator

Mapping:

·    Map current major infestations sites of high /medium and Class 1 and Class 2 priority pests.

·    Encourage landholders to report and provide  maps of the locations of priority pest plants on land they manage

·    Update maps of known infestations.

 

MRC

 BSQ
Landcare

SW

 

On-going

Map all sites of pest plants within Region and download onto MapInfo

 

Map produced and

Updated annually

 

Provide information to DEEDI

Funding:

·    Investigate and source additional funding and resources to help manage pests.

 

 

MRC/ Landholders

Land Catchment Management Groups (QMDC/SWNRM)

On-going

Amount of additional

funding sourced

 

Private Property:

·    Provide advice to landowners regarding the control of infestation areas on private areas, as required.

·    Work cooperatively and encourage           landholders to be committed to eradication of pest infestations.

·    Conduct regular follow-up inspections of known infestation areas on private property of high priority pests.

 

MRC (LLO)

On-going

No. of complaints

 

No. of property

inspections

undertaken

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

4.1  Very High Priority Plants

 

A

Prevention of introduction

Plant  Name

Fire Weed

Chilean Needle Grass

Salvinia

Priority in Adjacent Local Areas

Fireweed has a high priority level as it has not been detected in this Region, neighbouring Local Government areas do not have any infestations.  Very invasive plant and maybe toxic to animals

Operational Objective

No plants within the Shire.

Success Indicator

Not identified within the Shire

 

Operational Actions

Action

Who

When

Status

Encourage landholders to remain vigilant and identify weeds so as control measures can be implemented quickly Through inclusion of colour pest fact information of Fire Weed, Chilean Needle Grass and Salvinia in ‘Bottle Tree Bulletin’ once per annum for identification purposes

MRC (LLO)

LH

On-going

 

Availability of Information – information located on Council website and link to DEEDI website

MRC (LLO)

LH

Bio-Security Qld

On-going

 

Work collaboratively with natural resource bodies to ensure local landcare group members can identify plants and know the process of advising DEEDI and Council

MRC (LLO)

MBCMC

SWNRM

DEEDI

 

 

Implement a rapid response program to eradicate a plant identified within this Shire.

 

 

 

 

LH

MRC (LLO)

On-going

 

Measures of Success:

No plants within the Shire

Success Indicators:

No plants within the Shire

 

 

 

 

 

4.1  High Priority Plants cont.

 

B

Eradication

Plant  Name

Cats Claw Vine, New outbreak of Parthenium Mesquite, Lantana,  Parkinsonia, Prickly Acacia, Giant  Rat’s Tail Grass, Water Lettuce, Rubber Vine, Water Hyacinth, Honey Locust, 

Priority in Adjacent Local Areas

Neighbouring Local Governments have placed high priority to eliminate any infestations of the above plants.

Operational Objective

Eradicate cats claw vine within the Bungil Creek area.  Seek assistance from all urban residents to eliminate the plant from their garden.

Eradicate all other high priority plant through control mechanisms

Operational Actions

Action

Who

When

Status

Monitor and map current identified sites to ensure eradication of plants.

 

MRC (LLO)

LH

Sub catchment groups

DERM - Forestry and National Parks

On-going

 

Eradicate, all high priority plants by implementing best practice control methods.

MRC (LLO)

LH

On-going

 

Identify and contact urban land holders and gardeners to eliminate rubber vine, honey locusts to prevent spread of plant within the region

DEEDI

MRC (LLO)

December 2012

 

Provide information in ‘Bottle Tree Bulletin’ that outlines land owner obligations and how to identify and eradicate these plants

LH

MRC (LLO)

On-going

 

Identify and contact land holders along Bungil and Yalebone Creeks to eradicate cats claw vine in water courses.

Identify and contact urban gardeners to eliminate cats claw vine in urban gardens.

DEEDI

MRC (LLO)

On-going

 

Integrate actions within sub-catchment and catchment plans  through awareness, field days/agricultural shows providing information to identify plants and the impact should no control actions occur

SWNRM, QMDC, Landcare, Sub-catchment groups

On-going

 

Measures of Success:

Elimination of  pest plants within the Shire

Eradicate new infestations

Number of community responses from articles placed in Bottle Tree Bulletin.

Number of land holders along Bungil and Yalebone Creeks that have implemented action to eradicate plants in the water course. Number of urban residents that have eliminated cats claw vine

Success Indicators:

Elimination and no new infestations of plants within the Shire

 

 

 

 

C

Containment

Plant  Name

Parthenium – heavy infestation northern section of Shire (Mitchell and Roma) – medium to west, south and south west, no plants identified in the eastern section of the Shire

Harrisia Cactus

Rope Pear

African Boxthorn

Green Cestrum

Mother of Millions

Priority in Adjacent Local Areas

Neighbouring Local Government areas have ‘high priority’ to ensure no major infestations

 

Operational Objective

Contain to current areas.  Maintain mapping of all species so as annual comparison can be made.

Operational Actions

Action

Who

When

Status

Continue to map all pest plant sites

MRC (LLO)

LH

On-going

 

Control roadside parthenium growth (North of Mitchell and Roma) to eliminate further spreading of plant by vehicular traffic.

 

MRC (LLO)

LH

Community

On-going

 

Spray all other plants at least twice per annum or as season dictates

MRC (LLO)

On-going

 

Continue to promote bi-control methods for Parthenium, Mother of Millions and Harrisia Cactus

DEEDI

MRC (LLO)

QMDC

SWNRM

On-going

 

Measures of Success:

Reduction in Rope Pear, African Boxthorn, Green Cestrum infested areas.

Ensure through comparison maps of harrisia cactus and mother of millions, that sites have decreased

Monitor the impact of bio-control agents at released sites

 

Success Indicators:

Reduction of pest plant areas

Release of bi-control agents

 


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

4.2  High Priority Animals

 

                   B

 

Early Detection and Eradication

Plant  Name

Locusts

Priority in Adjacent Local Areas

Eliminate the spread of parthenium, work with neighbouring Local Governments to eliminate as well as reduce infestations

Operational Objective

Provide advice to landholders and form locust committee when and where necessary

Operational Actions

Action

Who

When

Status

Monitor and survey where Council has received complaints

MRC (LLO)

LH

On-going

 

Assist Bio-Security Qld Officer in survey and control programs

DEEDI

MRC (LLO)

LH

On-going

 

Provide landholders and urban residents with advice and process required to eliminate pest plants from property

LH

MRC (LLO)

On-going

 

Measures of Success:

Reduced impact

Implement action plans when required

Success Indicators:

Reduced impact on cropping areas

 

4.2  High Priority Animals

 

C

 

Containment

Plant  Name

Wild Horse

Priority in Adjacent Local Areas

No wild horse infestations in neighbouring Local Government areas

Control Information

Work in collaboration with DERM/DEEDI personnel to control pest animal within known sites

Operational Objective

To reduce the impact wild horses are having on the natural environment

Operational Actions

Action

Who

When

Status

Assist and support when and where requested

DEEDI

DERM

MRC (LLO)

On-going

 

Provide technical advise to landholders

MRC (LLO)

LH

Community

On-going

 

Measures of Success:

Reduced number of wild horses within the Shire

Success Indicators:

No complaints of wild horses

Improved revegetation in high impacted areas

 

 

4.2  High Priority Animals

 

D

Broadscale Management

Plant  Name

Wild Dogs, Rabbit

Priority in Adjacent Local Areas

Reduce pest animal sightings/infestations

Operational Objective

Increased land holder participation in wild dog management across the Shire.  Integrated baiting programs with neighbour Shires.  Actively participate in QDog procedure

Reduced rabbit infestation within the Shire.  Work with DEEDI personnel to implement bio control to reduce rabbit numbers.

Operational Actions

Action

Who

When

Status

Monitor, map and record data on wild dog activities

MRC (LLO)

LH

MRCWDAG

On-going

 

Provide technical advise for the control

MRC (LLO)

LH

Community

On-going

 

Provide landholders and urban residents with advice and process required to eliminate pest animals

LH

MRC (LLO)

On-going

 

Measures of Success:

Reduce number of complaints, sightings and activities

Success Indicators:

Reduced complaints and impacts of pest animals


Attachment 2

Drat Pest Management Plan

 

5.0       Implementation

 

This draft Maranoa Regional Council Pest Management Plan was submitted to the Minister for Natural Resources in August 2012. 

 

The Minister judged that this plan satisfied the requirements of the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 (QLD), and in XXXXXX, 2012 advised council to adopt such plan.

 

In keeping with sections 30(2) and 32 of the Act, the council adopted the plan for implementation on XXXXXXX, 2012.  It is available for public inspection in both written and electronic form at the Council’s office.

 

The Plan will remain current until 1 July 2016, with annual action plans enabling its implementation over that time.  The annual action plan for 2010-11 will be reviewed for its effectiveness on or before 1 May 2011, as required by section 33(2) of the Act, and any shortfalls in the completion of its strategies will be addressed in the next year’s plan.

 

As part of the process of implementation, Maranoa Regional Council has communicated to stakeholders their responsibilities, and is overseeing the coordination of pest management activities contained within this Plan. 

 

Monitoring and evaluation processes (including the measurement of actions against stated success criteria) are in place to ensure the effectiveness of the plan.

 

Any amendments to the plan will require its resubmission to the minister for approval, and the old plan will be replaced upon the adoption of the new one.

 

 

6.0    Conclusion

 

Maranoa Regional Council will use available resources to implement this Pest Management Plan.  Actions associated with high priority pests will be implemented initially with other priority work to be done as time and budgetary constraints permit.

 

Prevention is generally recognised as a more cost effective method than containment or eradication.  Consequently Maranoa Regional Council also places a high priority on actions associated with hygiene management and awareness.

 

Maranoa Regional Council will continue to work with a range of stakeholders to implement this Plan and will undertake a regular review of actions, including how they are meeting the operational objectives through the stated success indicators.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX ONE

 

Pest Plants and Animals Maranoa Regional Council

 

Common Name

Scientific Name

African Boxthorn

Lycium ferocissimum

African Love Grass

Eragrostis curvula

Asparagus Fern

Asparagus aethiopicus ‘Sprengeri’ A. africanus and A. plumosus

Bathurst Burr

Zanthium spinosum

Carp

Cyprinus carpio

Castor Oil Plant

Ricinus communis

Cats Claw Vine

Macfadyena unguis-cati

Cotton Tail

Froelichia floridana

Cumbungi

Ttpha spp.

Dingoes

Canis familiaris dingo

European fox

Vulpes vulpes

European rabbits

Oryctolagus cuniculus

Feral goat

Capra hircus

Feral pig

Sus scrofa

Fire Weed

Senecio madagascariensis

Giant Rat’s Tail Grass

Sporobolus pyramidalis and S. natalensis

Green Cestrum

Cestrum parqui

Harrisa Cactus

Eriocereus spp.

Honey Locust

Gleditsia tricanthos

Lantana

Lantana camara

Lippia

Phyla canescens

Locusts

Chortoicetus terminifera, Locusta migratoria, Austracris guttulosa

Mesquite

Prosopis glandulosa, P. pallid and P. velutina

Mexican Poppy

Argemone ochroleuca.

Mice

Mus domesticus

Mimosa

Acacia farnesiana

Mother-of-Millions

Bryophyllum spp.

Noogoora Burr

Xanthium occidentale

Parkinsonia

Parkinsonia aculeate

Parthenium

Parthnium hysterophorus

Paterson’s Curse

Echium plantagineum

Pimelea

Pimelea elongate

Prickly Acacia

Acacia nilotica

Prickly Pear

(includes Velvety Tree Pear and Common Pest Pear) Opuntia stricta, O. tomentose

Rabbit / Hare

Oryctolagus cuniculus

Rubber Vine

Cryptostegia grandifilora

Saffron Thistle

Carthamus lanatus

Salvinia

Salvinia molesta

Thornapples

Datura spp.

Tiger Pear

Opuntia aurantiaca

Turnip Weed

Rapistrum rugosum

Water Hyacinth

Eichhornia crassipes

Water Lettuce

Pistia stratiotes


Attachment 1

Commerce Roma's Proposal to MRC for Christmas Tree - 18 Oct 2013

 



Attachment 2

Commerce Roma - Christmas Tree Quote - 18 Oct 2013

 


Attachment 3

Commercial Christmas - Additional Quote for Christmas Tree Project - 18 Oct 2013

 

                                             Quotation            

 

 

 

Maranoa Regional Council                                                                                       15th October 2013
ROMA COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE                                                                                              Quotation No:353513
38-44 Hawthorne Street Roma QLD 4455
Postal Address: P.O Box 42 MITCHELL QLD 4465
P: 1300 007 662
M: (04) 2843 8085  F: (07) 4624 6990
Email: Katrina.Marsh@maranoa.qld.gov.au  
Web: www.maranoa.qld.gov.au 

 

 

Item             Description                                   Qty         Location                    Unit                  Amount

 

 

 

Christmas Tree Purchase Package 20ft and 14ft Outdoor Christmas Tree’s

 

 

CTEXT20       20Ft Feature Outdoor Christmas tree     1              Maranoa Council              ea                   $ 12,990.00            

                        Steel Framed with stabilisers

                        Fully Decorated With Baubles, Stars,

                        Candy Canes and 120m Commercial Grade

                        Fairy Lighting LED Lighting

 

CTEXT14       14Ft Feature Christmas tree                   1              Maranoa Council               ea                   $   4,990,00 

                        Steel Framed with stabilisers

                        Fully Decorated With Baubles, Stars,

                        Candy Canes and 120m Commercial Grade

                        Fairy Lighting LED Lighting

 

 

Both Christmas tree’s as Package Deal                                                                                                                  $ 15,990.00

 

 

Freight for both Christmas trees 8 Pallets                                                                                                        $

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1

Brochure - The Centre Within

 



Attachment 2

Email of Request - Puddy Chandler

 


Attachment 1

2013 SQCT AGM Notice to MRC

 



Attachment 2

2013 SQCT AGM Invitation

 


Attachment 1

Briefing Paper - Community Development