Description: Maranoa Logo Process

Late Items

Business Paper

 

General Meeting

 

Wednesday 28 May 2014

 

Roma Administration Centre

 

NOTICE OF MEETING

 

Date: 27 May 2014

 

 

Mayor:                                                   Councillor R S Loughnan

 

Deputy Mayor:                                        Councillor W S Wason

Councillors:                                            Councillor J L Chambers

                                                              Councillor R J Denton

                                                              Councillor P J Flynn

                                                              Councillor W M Newman

                                                              Councillor C J O’Neil

                                                              Councillor M L Price

                                                              Councillor D J Schefe

 

Chief Executive Officer:                          Ms Julie Reitano

 

Senior Management:                               Mr Cameron Castles (Director Infrastructure Services)

                                                              Mr Rob Hayward (Director Development, Facilities & Environmental Services)

                                                              Ms Sharon Frank (Director Corporate, Community & Commercial Services)

 

Officers:                                                 Ms Jane Frith (Coordinator Corporate Communications)

 

Please find attached agenda for the General Meeting to be held at the Roma Administration Centre on May 28, 2014 at 9.00am.

Julie Reitano

Chief Executive Officer

 


Maranoa Regional Council

    

General Meeting -  28 May 2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Item       Subject

No

  

L            Late Items

L.1        Appointment of Acting Chief Executive Officer........................................... 2

Prepared by:      Julie Reitano, Chief Executive Officer

L.2        Cemetery Policies - Burials on Private Land and Operations................. 4

Prepared by:      Dale Waldron, Manager - Administration & Information Services

Attachment 1:    Draft - New Council Policy - Burials on Private Property.. 6

Attachment 2:    Draft -  Reviewed Council Policy - Cemeteries Operations 8

Attachment 3:    Current - Council Controlled Cemeteries Policy.............. 18

L.3        Supported Accomodation Assistance Program - Changes to Service Agreement 32

Prepared by:      Julie Neil, Manager - Community Services

Attachment 1:    Homelessless Program Guidelines.................................... 37

Attachment 2:    Service Agreement (Part C)-Specificagtions for Community and Homelessness Services....................................................... 75

Attachment 3:    Service_Agreement_Standard_Terms V1 0 30April2014 94   

 


Maranoa Regional Council

    

General Meeting -  28 May 2014

Officer Report

Meeting: General  28 May 2014

Date: 26 May 2014

Item Number: L.1

File Number: D14/36533

 

Subject Heading:                     Appointment of Acting Chief Executive Officer

Classification:                                   Open Access  

Name of Applicant:                          N/A

Location:                                            N/A

Author & Officer’s Title:                 Julie Reitano, Chief Executive Officer

 

Executive Summary: 

Seeking Council’s approval for the appointment of an “Acting Chief Executive Officer” to cover duties during a period personal leave, as requested by the Chief Executive Officer.

 

Officer’s Recommendation:  

That Council endorse the appointment of Robert Hayward in the position of Acting Chief Executive Officer commencing 26 May 2014, until further notification is received from the Chief Executive Officer.

 

 

Body of Report:

Council’s approval is sought for the appointment of an “Acting Chief Executive Officer” to cover duties during personal leave, as requested by the Chief Executive Officer.

The Local Government Act 2009 prescribes under Section 195 of the Act –

A local government may appoint a qualified person to act as the chief executive officer during-

 

(a) Any vacancy, or all vacancies, in the position; or

(b) Any period, or all periods, when the chief executive officer is absent from duty or cannot, for another reason, perform the chief executive officer’s responsibilities.

Consultation (internal/external):

Mayor – Cr. Robert Loughnan

Robert Hayward – Director Development, Facilities & Environmental Services

Risk Assessment (Legal, Financial, Political etc.):

Nil

Policy Implications:

Proposed approach meets the requirements of the Local government Act 2009, Section 195.

Financial Resource Implications:

Nil

 

Link to Corporate Plan:

Corporate Plan 2009-2013 8.2.3(a) To implement Council’s governance policies and procedures in an evolving organisational environment whilst ensuring legislative relevance, consistency and fairness in application.

Supporting Documentation:

Nil

 

  


Maranoa Regional Council

    

General Meeting -  28 May 2014

Officer Report

Meeting: General  28 May 2014

Date: 9 April 2014

Item Number: L.2

File Number: D14/24872

 

Subject Heading:                     Cemetery Policies - Burials on Private Land and Operations

Classification:                                   Open Access  

Name of Applicant:                          N/A

Location:                                            N/A

Author & Officer’s Title:                 Dale Waldron, Manager - Administration & Information Services

 

Executive Summary: 

The purpose of this new policy and policy review is to cover Burials on Private Land/Properties and to set forth the management framework for the Cemeteries under the care and control of Maranoa Regional Council.

 

 

Officer’s Recommendation:  

That Council adopt the Cemetery Operations and Burials on Private Property Policies as presented for implementation across the region.

 

 

Body of Report:

The new policy - Burials on Private Property sets the guidelines for applications of burials on private land or property.

 

Maranoa Regional Council has sixteen (16) cemeteries located within its boundaries.  The Cemeteries Operations policy review sets forth the management framework for the cemeteries under the care and control of Maranoa Regional Council and covers the management of the cemeteries, offences, monuments, conservation, heritage and closed or historical cemeteries.

The implementation of this policy will ensure that the sixteen (16) cemeteries within the region of Maranoa Regional Council are all managed and maintained to the same standard and will guarantee that the burial practices within each town are standardized.

This reviewed policy – Cemetery Operations replaces the existing policy – Council Controlled Cemeteries.  ST.15.1 – 14 December 2011.

Consultation (internal/external):

Cameron Castles, Director Infrastructure

Sharon Frank, Director Corporate, Community and Commercial Services

Robert Hayward, Director, Development, Facilities and Environment

Danielle Pearn, Manager Development

Julian McEwan, Manager Roads & Drainage (North)

John Gwydir, Manager Roads & Drainage (South)

Konrad Crawford, Coordinator Parks and Gardens

 

Risk Assessment (Legal, Financial, Political etc.):

Legal, Financial

Policy Implications:

Nil

Financial Resource Implications:

Nil

 

Link to Corporate Plan:

Corporate Plan 2009-2013 8.2.3(a) To implement Council’s governance policies and procedures in an evolving organisational environment whilst ensuring legislative relevance, consistency and fairness in application.

Supporting Documentation:

1View

Draft - New Council Policy - Burials on Private Property

D14/27594

2View

Draft -  Reviewed Council Policy - Cemeteries Operations

D14/24880

3View

Current - Council Controlled Cemeteries Policy

D12/16215

 

Report authorised by:

Sharon Frank, Director - Corporate, Community & Commercial Services


Attachment 1

Draft - New Council Policy - Burials on Private Property

 

 

 

1.        Policy Purpose

The Objective of the policy is to set down guidelines defining relevant criteria to allow burials on private land/property.

 

2.         Policy Scope

This policy will apply to all interments of deceased persons on private land/property not being a public or private cemetery. 

 

3.         Definitions

IMMEDIATE FAMILY                Parent, sibling, child by blood, adoption or marriage, spouse, grandparent or grandchild.

4.         Policy Details

Whilst Council would prefer a person to be buried in a public cemetery, Council does recognise that  on occasions  requests will be submitted  to allow a family member to be buried on private land/property where the deceased person has had an historical association with the land/property.

The operation of the cemetery and interment of deceased persons on private land/property must be approved by Council.  No interment shall take place on private land/property unless approval for burial has been issued by Council.

                       

                        Burials on freehold and leasehold land will only be permitted on site if:

 

·    evidence is provided that the person or their immediate family  has or had an historical association with the land: and

 

·    the total landholding must be equal to or exceed fifty (50) hectares; and

 

·    the area should be suitably fenced to delineate the boundaries of the location and secure the location; and

 

·    each grave should be permanently marked with details of the deceased and the boundaries of the grave excavation should also be permanently marked; and

 

·    the burial location site should be described and drawn along with GPS coordinates of the location of the deceased buried in respective sites and a copy should be forwarded to the local authority for placement on the property file and burial register.

 

                       

Requests which are not supported by historical association in the above circumstances are to be tabled for Council’s consideration.  To allow peace of mind for family members, Council will consider requests for arrangements for future burials on private land/property.

 

Notification and details of burials will be submitted electronically to the Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages (RBDM) – Department of Justice and Attorney-General.

 

 

 

5.         Related Policies and Legislation

 

           

            Local Government Act 2009

            Land Regulation 2009

           

           

                        Local Law No. 1 (Administration) 2011

            Subordinate Local Law No.1.9 (Operation of Cemeteries) 2011

            Subordinate Local Law No.1.13 (Undertaking Regulated Activities regarding Human Remains) 2011

Cemeteries Operations Policy 2014

           

 

6.         Associated Documents

 

            Maranoa Regional Council Register of Regulatory Fees and Commercial Charges

            Cemeteries Burial Booking Procedure 2013

            Cemeteries Burial Procedure 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

            _____________________________                                                  __________________________

            MAYOR                                                                                              CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

            Date: ____/____/____                                                             Date: ____/____/____




Attachment 2

Draft -  Reviewed Council Policy - Cemeteries Operations

 

 

 

1.               Policy Purpose

The objective of the policy is to set down guidelines for the management and administration of Council owned cemeteries.

 

 

2.         Policy Scope

The policy covers all matters relevant to all Maranoa Regional Council managed cemeteries and applies to Council employees, Councillors, funeral directors, community members, legislative authorities and contractors.

 

 

 

3.         Definitions

                                     

AUTHORISED PERSON                        A person authorised by the delegated authority to exercise the powers of an authorised person under this policy and Council’s Local Laws.

 

BURIAL                                                Means the interment of non-cremated human remains

 

BURIAL LICENCE                                 A licence for interment of non-cremated human remains

 

BURIAL LICENCE HOLDER                  Person who has been issued with a burial licence

 

CEMETERY OR CEMETERIES              Designated area containing one or more burial places and/or areas for cremated remains

 

COUNCIL                                              Maranoa Regional Council

 

COLUMBARIUM                                    A Structure having recesses in the walls to receive cremated remains

 

CREMATION                                         To reduce a body to ashes by fire

 

EXHUMATION                                      The removal of human remains

 

FEES AND CHARGES                           A fee or charge fixed by Council and published in Council’s Register of Fees and Charges

 

HEADSTONE                                        Masonry structure placed at the head of a grave site

 

INURNMENT                                         The practice of placing an urn in a niche wall and closing it up

 

LAWN CEMETERY                               Burial area in which standard plaques are placed ground level on a concrete plinth and the remainder of the cemetery is mown grass

 

ASH WALL                                           A Structure having recesses in the walls to receive cremated remains and a standard plaque located.  A plaque may be located in such areas without the placement of ashes

 

MONUMENT                                         Any structure, headstone masonry, metal work, casting or item placed over, in or around a burial right or grave site

 

NICHE                                                  Inurnment site or place in a wall where a container containing ashes of a deceased person may be placed

 

PLAQUE                                               Memorial sign that is attached to a plinth, headstone or niche wall

 

PLINTH                                                A flat stone structure placed on a grave for which a plaque or monument is attached

 

REGISTER                                           Council’s formal data repository containing details of a burial, memorial site, immurement right, interment right or burial right

 

RESERVATION                                     Pre-need burial right

 

4.         Policy Details

4.1.  Introduction

 

Council maintains 16 cemeteries with the Maranoa Regional Council area providing a combination of monumental and lawn sections, and columbarium walls.  These are:-

 

§ Amby Monumental Cemetery,

§ Hodgson Monumental Cemetery,

§ Injune Lawn Cemetery,

§ Injune Monumental Cemetery,

§ Jackson Monumental Cemetery,

§ Mitchell Monumental Cemetery, 

§ Mungallala Monumental Cemetery,

§ Roma Lawn Cemetery,

§ Roma Monumental Cemetery,

§ Roma Ash Wall,

§ Surat Monumental Cemetery,

§ Surat Ash Wall,

§ Wallumbilla Lawn Cemetery,

§ Wallumbilla Monumental Cemetery,

§ Yuleba Lawn Cemetery

§ Yuleba Monumental Cemetery.

 

All other cemeteries in the Maranoa region are administered by private trustees or closed to future burials.

 

Council recognises the heritage value of each cemetery and takes this into consideration with the ongoing management of each cemetery.  It is acknowledged that cemeteries are special places requiring sensitive and sympathetic management, however this may not always be practicable.  Council, as the Cemetery Manager reserves the right to determine what is appropriate, hazardous and acceptable management of a cemetery.

 

Commitment

 

As the Cemetery Manager of the cemeteries within the Maranoa Regional Council area, Council is the sole determinant of dignified behaviour within the cemeteries.  This includes what constitutes a dignified funeral, monument design and installation, and the placement of tributes in addition to the permanent monument.

 

To minimise conflict as to what Council deems appropriate and acceptable conduct, Council has prepared and implemented this Policy.

 

Every attempt will be made to liaise with the families, funeral director or other representatives prior to any action being taken, however Council staff may take action to rectify situations without prior consultation if required.

 

4.2.  Provisions at Cemeteries

 

Council will make such provisions as it considers necessary for the following:-

4.2.1   A Register of Burial, as required by Subordinate Local Law No.1.9, must be kept in respect of all burial places.

4.2.2   A Register of Cremation, as required by Subordinate Local Law No.1.9, must be kept in respect of each cremation.

4.2.3   The establishment and standards of construction and design for monuments and structures.

4.2.4   The size, multiple use and location of burial places.

4.2.5   The erection or installation of structures and the make of inscriptions.

4.2.6   The carrying out of work by monument masons.

4.2.7   The removal, replacement and maintenance of structures.

4.2.8   The improvement and maintenance of cemeteries.

4.2.9   The conduct of religious or other ceremonies of burial, cremation, disposition or commemoration.

 

4.3.  Register of Burial Places and Cremation

 

4.3.1   A Register of Burial, as required by Subordinate Local Law No.1.9, must be kept in respect of all burial places.

4.3.2   A Register of Cremation, as required by Subordinate Local Law No.1.9, must be kept in respect of each cremation.

4.3.3   A register of pre-need burial rights (Reserve Graves) will be kept and must contain the name and address of the owner of the burial right.

4.3.4   Each register, which may be kept in written, printed or electronic form, must contain sufficient information to allow for simple cross-referencing or entries by:-

           

            Surname

            Date of burial or cremation

            Burial place location

 

4.3.5   Each burial or cremation must be recorded in its respective register immediately after the service.

4.3.6   Registers may be amended to remove or correct inaccuracies.

 

4.4.  Exclusive right of burial

 

4.4.1   Council will issue to the owner of an exclusive right of burial a certificate upon request, clearly showing:-

 

            The owners name and address

            The amount paid

            The date of issue

            A description of the physical location of the grave

            The terms and conditions under which the certificate is issued

 

4.4.2   Any fees relating to the purchase and issue of the certificate must be paid at the time of application.

4.4.3   The Council may refuse to grant an exclusive right of burial to any person if, in the opinion of Council, the grant would create a monopoly or encourage dealings in such rights as a business.

4.4.4   Council will facilitate the transfer of a right of burial as result of a bequest following receipt of written evidence authorising the transfer and payment of the appropriate fee, and where this transfer does not facilitate the creation of a monopoly or a commercial transaction within the cemetery.

4.4.5   Council may cancel a right of burial if the right of burial is not exercised within 60 years of issue.  Council will utilise all available information to determine the availability or otherwise of the plot.  For example, a right of burial may exist at one particular cemetery but Council has evidence that the right of burial holder has been interred at another cemetery.

 

4.5.  Burials

 

4.5.1   Burials  in Council cemeteries must be undertaken by an accredited funeral business.

4.5.2   Human remains must not be brought into a Maranoa Regional Council cemetery unless:-

·    Approval has been granted by Council; and

·    The remains are enclosed in a coffin or other form of container appropriate to the proposed form of disposal and complies with the industry standards for constructing coffins or other forms of containers for the burial of human remains;  if it complies with the following requirements:-

a)  Not leak liquids or gases;

b)  Be securely closed during transportation to the burial site and at the time of interment;

c)  Be constructed so as to not distort or collapse when handled during the normal course of event leading up to the burial (including handling when damp);

d)  Be approved in writing by the Chief Executive Officer of the relevant Queensland Government Department with oversight of cemeteries and crematoria.

4.5.3   Boxed ashes may be interred by private citizens during Council’s ordinary business hours (or pre-arrange time).

4.6.  Order for Burials

4.6.1    Burials and interment of ashes shall take place only during the hours approved by Council.

            These hours are:

·    between the hours of 8.30 am and 3.30 pm Monday to Friday; or

·    by arrangement with Council on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays (with the exclusion of Good Friday, Anzac Day and Christmas Day.)  Burials by special arrangement will be subject to additional fees as laid out in Councils Fees and Charges schedule.

4.6.2   Notice of the proposed burial, exhumation or disposal must be given to Council a minimum of two (2) full working days prior to the event.

            4.6.3    There will be a minimum of three (3) hours between service bookings at any one cemetery.

            4.6.4    Council may approve funerals inside of the two day notice period due to exceptional circumstances from time to time subject to conditions of, and approval by, the authorised person.

            4.6.5    Burials are not to take place unless a burial order/application has been approved by Council.

            4.6.6    Where, in the opinion of the authorised person, the digging of any particular grave is impossible or impracticable because of flooding, wet ground, rock or any other reason, the authorised person may, in his or her absolute discretion, refuse a burial in that grave and may order the relocation of the burial to another grave plot regardless of prior arrangements.

            4.6.7    Council may, due to operational needs, change or modify hours of burial as required, as approved by an authorised person.

 

4.7.  Bringing of Human Remains into a Cemetery

 

            4.7.1    A person must not bring human remains into a Maranoa Regional Council cemetery unless approval has been given by an authorised officer.

            4.7.2    The remains are to be enclosed in a coffin or other form of container appropriate to the proposed form of disposal and complies with the industry standards.

4.8.  Requirements for Graves

 

            4.8.1    All adult plots will be dug at a standard depth of 2.7 metres to allow for two burials except in the instance where the soil structure or ground stability does not allow for a second interment.

            4.8.2    A plot must be dug at a depth of 2.7 metres (9 feet) to allow a triple burial and the request for such must be received at the time of the first interment.

            4.8.3    There must be not less than 1 metre of soil coverage on top of the last coffin in a grave.

            4.8.4    The maximum number of coffin interments per grave space/plot is three (3) dependent on the depth of the first and second interments or if otherwise restricted in some way which would prevent reopening of the grave.

            4.8.5    This section does not affect the interment of cremated remains.

            4.8.6    Burials within the designated children section shall only be facilitated where the coffin or casket size can be accommodated within the limitations of the surveyed plot.

 

4.9.  Exhumations

 

            4.9.1    Exhumations are NOT to take place unless Council has received :-

·    Lodgement of written confirmation from an accredited undertaker that he/she is prepared to carry out the exhumation; and

·    Lodgement of the written consent to the proposed exhumation by the nearest living relative to the deceased; and

·    Lodgement of a Council’s application form duly completed, together with the provision of the death certificate.

            4.9.2    Exhumations will be subject to the conditions outlined in Council’s Subordinate Local Law No.1.13.

 

4.10.  Above Ground Entombment

 

            4.10.1 Council does not facilitate above ground entombments.

 

4.11.  Vertical Burials

 

            4.11.1 Council may consider a vertically spaced cemetery (as opposed to a conventional horizontal spacing) in the future for lawn cemeteries.

            4.11.2 Vertical spaced cemeteries are not planned for any Council cemetery and are not to be implemented for any burial (unless a religious or cultural request to undertake such a burial is received).

 

 

4.12.  Opening and Reopening of Graves

 

            4.12.1 Council staff will arrange for the digging of a grave by an appropriately qualified person.

            4.12.2 Open (prepared) graves must be covered with an appropriate structure to prevent persons from falling in if they are left unattended, unless an appropriate alternative barrier is in place.

            4.12.3 After a burial, a grave may only be reopened for a further burial with the written approval of the authorised person.

            4.12.4 The Council shall take every care when required to re-open a grave for a second or subsequent burial but will not accept responsibility for any accidental or unintentional damage caused to monuments, gravesite or lawn during such opening.

            4.12.5 Where it is necessary to re-open a grave by breaking up and removing a concrete cover/monument, the Council shall not be responsible for re-instatement of the memorial following burial.

            4.12.6 Breaking up or removing a concrete/granite/marble etc cover on a monument, to allow re reopening of a grave for second or third interment shall be subject to the following:-

·    Liaison with the authorised person at the time of booking the interment; and

·    Completed by a person qualified to undertake such work, eg. concrete cutters, stonemason; and

·    Be organised by the person arranging the funeral, the funeral director, burial right holder or family member; and

·    Be completed in adequate time to allow excavation of the grave.

            4.12.7 The Council may apply quantities of water or employ other methods to graves following interment to assist with subsidence and compaction of soil so that the grave can be restored to previous levels as soon as possible.

            4.12.8 The size and position of all graves in Council cemetery is to be determined by the authorised person.

 

4.13.  War Graves

 

            4.13.1 Council does not have a specified area for war graves.

            4.13.2 These can be accommodated in the general cemeteries, and are to be constructed and maintained by the Australian War Graves Commission.

 

4.14.  Plaques, Monuments and Inscriptions – Monumental & Injune Lawn

 

            4.14.1 Headstones and monuments in the general sections of the Councils’ cemeteries are the responsibility of the holder of the burial licence.

            4.14.2 Should these items be damaged, vandalised or fall into disrepair it is the responsibility of the burial licence holder to make repairs.

            4.14.3 If headstones or monuments are dangerous, Council may conduct works to make the area safe.  This work may involve the placement of a headstone on the ground to prevent it from falling and will not include repairs or reinstatement of the headstone.

            4.14.4 All required fees to be paid and authorisation given before any work is commenced by suitably qualified stonemasons.

            4.14.5 The site must be reinstated to the previous standard with all rubbish and debris removed from the cemetery.

            4.14.6 Surrounding monuments and headstones must not be damaged in the course of undertaking any works.

            4.14.7 Memorials must be consistent with the existing amenity of the cemetery

            4.14.8 Plastic type materials will not be permitted.

            4.14.9 The memorial shall be contained within the grave plot and be less that one metre in height unless certified by a structural engineer.

            4.14.10The planting of trees, shrubs, roses or any other plants is not permitted on a grave/plot.

 

4.15.  Plaques, Monuments and Inscriptions – Lawn

 

            4.15.1 Council will determine the standard sizes and design type for all memorial plaques and be responsible for the procurement of such to ensure conformity.

            4.15.2 Only one plaque per plinth is accepted. This plinth has recessed flower receptacles.

            4.15.3 Council will supply a standard concrete plinth for the affixing of a plaque.  However applicants may make arrangements through an accredited monumental mason to supply a sandstone, granite or marble base consistent with the dimensions determined by Council.

            4.15.4 Any image used for a photo must display the face of the person interred (or to be interred) at the location and cannot be interpreted as offensive in a public venue.

            4.15.5 Other than photographs, no other form of media can be added to the plaque (eg. sound, video, lights etc).

 

4.16.  Flowers and ornaments

 

            4.16.1 Council welcomes the limited placement of fresh or artificial tributes at burial and memorial sites however, it is committed to providing fair guidelines that apply uniformly to everyone.  This will ensure families are able to grieve in an environment that is safe and tidy and allow Council to meet its obligations in the management of the cemetery grounds.

            4.16.2 No unauthorised tree, shrub or other plant is to be placed or planted on any grave.

            4.16.3 Within the lawn sections, flowers may be placed in the receptacles on the plaque plinth.

            4.16.4 Within the monumental areas, flowers and ornaments may be placed within the confines of the plot where the grave top has been paved or has a low fence to enclose the plot area.

            4.16.5 Flowers and ornaments must not exceed a height of 30cm.

            4.16.6 The placement of flowers must not encroach on the lawn, adjacent graves or walkways.

            4.16.7 The limit on receptacles is designed to allow families to express their grief but also ensures that other families do not feel marginalised or impinged upon by the placement of excessive items upon neighbouring locations.

            4.16.8 Tributes that encroach on neighbouring burial or memorial positions will be removed.

            4.16.9 Within the Children’s section of the Lawn Cemeteries, small ornaments or mementos may be placed within the plinth area relating to the grave site.  No items are to be placed on the grassed area of the plot. The placement of small ornaments or mementos in the Adult Sections of the Lawn Cemeteries is prohibited.

            4.16.10Within the monumental sections, small ornaments or mementos may be placed within that area relating to the grave where the top has been paved or has been enclosed by a low fence.

            4.16.11Glass jars/bottles/containers, ceramic pots, crosses and large mementos are not permitted.  If used they will be immediately removed from the cemetery.

            4.16.12Any non-approved items will be removed.

            4.16.13Fresh flowers, wreaths and artificial flowers will be removed from grave sites by Council staff if, in their opinion, they have deteriorated to such an extent as to detract from the appearance of the cemetery.

 

 

4.17.  Ashes – Placement in Graves

 

            4.17.1 Placement of cremated remains shall take place during the hours approved by Council.

            4.17.2 Multiple ashes are permitted to be placed in existing or new graves

            4.17.3 A maximum of four (4) ashes may be interred in a new grave and a maximum of two (2) ashes interred in an existing grave.  The plaques for lawn graves must comply with standard sizes and designs set by Council and must be ordered and placed by council.

            4.17.4 It is a requirement that details of the interment are memorialised on a plaque or monument.

 

4.18.  Ashes – Placement in Columbarium/Ash Wall

 

            4.18.1 Placement of cremated remains shall take place only during the hours approved by Council.

            4.18.2 The container holding the ashes must be constructed of suitable weather resistant material.

            4.18.3 A standard cast brass plaque or commonwealth War Graves plaque of the standard size must be installed over the niche.

            4.18.4 The placing of vases, bottles or containers, for holding of flowers is not permitted.

 

4.19.  Ashes – Scattering in a Cemetery

 

            4.19.1 Ashes must not be scattered in a Council administered cemetery without prior approval.

            4.19.2 Details of the deceased must be provided in writing.

            4.19.3 Scattering of ashes shall only take place during the hours approved by Council.

            4.19.4 The ashes must not be scattered so as to contaminate water sources or affect persons of close proximity.

 

4.20.  Removal of Ashes

 

            4.20.1 Applications to have cremated remains removed from any cemetery for any reasons, must be made in writing to Council.  The application must be signed by all applicants or their rightful successor, or a statutory declaration may be submitted stating that all near relations of the deceased have been advised of the request for removal.

            4.20.2 The holder of the burial licence may relinquish the burial licence to Council in writing after the removal of the ashes.

 

4.21.  Fees and Charges

 

            4.21.1 Fees for services are determined by Council and specified in Council’s Register of Regulatory Fees and Commercial Charges.

            4.21.2 All fees are to be paid in advance, unless approved credit arrangement is in place.

            4.22.2 Council staff will not issue any certification until the appropriate fee if required in advance has been received.

            4.22.3 Graves can only be reserved on payment of the purchase for the grave.

 

 

4.25.  Prohibited – All Cemeteries

 

            A person (other than an authorised employee or contractor of Council) must not do any of

            the following (within a cemetery without written exemption from Council) :-

           

            4.25.1 Erect an unapproved monument/structure or tribute.

            4.25.2 Damage, deface, interfere with or alter burial places.

            4.25.3 Damage, deface, interfere with or alter monuments.

            4.25.4 Disturb or interfere with a lawfully conducted funeral or commemorative service.

            4.25.5 Bury, inter or exhume any human or non-human remains, whether cremated or not.

            4.25.6 Enter or remain in a cemetery between sunset and sunrise, unless Council permission is obtained.

            4.25.7 Cause or permit an animal that is under the person’s control to enter or remain in a cemetery without proper supervision.

            4.25.8 Take part in any gathering, meeting or assembly, except for the purpose of recognised religious, research, historical, educational or other ceremony of burial or commemoration.

            4.25.9 Engage in trade or commerce or distribute any circulars, advertisements, paper drawn or photographic material

            4.25.10Drive a vehicle at a speed of more that 8 kilometres per hour.

            4.25.11Park a vehicle on any known burial place, verge or plantation, or in a manner that is   likely to impede traffic.

            4.25.12Teach, learn or practice driving a vehicle.

            4.25.13Camp or reside on any land.

            4.25.14Possess or consume an alcoholic or intoxicating beverage or substance except from that directly associated with a funeral service.

            4.25.15Urinate or defecate (anywhere other that in a public toilet).

            4.25.16Bring into or leave any rubbish, refuse, scrap metal (including remains of vehicles), rock, soil, sand or any other substances.

            4.25.17Remove any dead timber, logs, trees and flora whether standing or fallen.

            4.25.18Kill, capture or in any way interfere with animal, bird, fish or other fauna whether native or introduced.

            4.25.19Plant any tree, shrub, herbage or other plant with prior consent.

            4.25.20Obstruct any authorised person of, or contractor, of Council or any Funeral Business to, in the performance of the authorised person’s duty or the employee’s or contractor’s, or Funeral Business’ work in the cemetery.

            4.25.21Picking flowers or plants within the cemetery grounds.

            4.25.22Discharge a firearm (except at a military funeral).

 

Offenders may be prosecuted under relevant Local, State or Federal Law.

 

5.         Conservation and Heritage

 

            Council recognises that burial grounds and cemeteries are places of significance to the community by virtue of their architectural, social and genealogical significance, and will provide reasonable assistance to community groups and interested parties who seek to promote or research cemetery issues.

 

 

6.         Closed/Historical Cemeteries

The Monumental section of the Injune Cemetery is closed and the Monumental section of the Roma Cemetery will be closed upon the allocation of the remaining available plots excepting where an Exclusive Right of Burial has been granted.

            The following are Historical Cemeteries only:

·    Bindango Historical Cemetery

·    Euthella Historical Cemetery

·    Muckadilla Historical Cemetery

·    Yingerbay Historical Cemetery

           

 

7.         Related Policies and Legislation

 

           

            Local Government Act 2009

            Land Regulation 2009

 

                        Local Law No. 1 (Administration) 2011

            Subordinate Local Law No.1.9 (Operation of Cemeteries) 2011

            Subordinate Local Law No.1.13 (Undertaking Regulated Activities regarding Human Remains) 2011

Burials on Private Property Policy 2014

           

 

 

8.         Associated Documents

 

            Maranoa Regional Council Register of Regulatory Fees and Commercial Charges

            Cemeteries Burial Booking Procedure 2013

            Cemeteries Burial Procedure 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

            _____________________________                                                  __________________________

            MAYOR                                                                                              CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

            Date: ____/____/____                                                             Date: ____/____/____




Attachment 3

Current - Council Controlled Cemeteries Policy

 















Maranoa Regional Council

    

General Meeting -  28 May 2014

Officer Report

Meeting: General  28 May 2014

Date: 24 May 2014

Item Number: L.3

File Number: D14/36172

 

Subject Heading:                     Supported Accomodation Assistance Program - Changes to Service Agreement

Classification:                                   Open Access   

Name of Applicant:                         

Location:                                           

Author & Officer’s Title:                 Julie Neil, Manager - Community Services

 

Executive Summary: 

A revised service agreement for the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP) was provided 21 May 2014.

 

Amendments to the current version require consideration by Council.

 

Two noteworthy amendments included;

1.   Extending the length of accommodation stay for tenants for “as long as the client requires to secure and maintain sustainable housing”.

2.   Limited length of Service Agreement duration (from 1 October 2014 till 30 September 2015). After this date, SAAP will go to open tender.

 

A decision to continue this service will require approval of the new service agreement and a submission drafted by 10 June 2014.

 

 

Officer’s Recommendation:  

That Council approve a submission to renew Council’s Supported Accommodation Assistance Program Service Agreement till 30 September 2015

 

 

Body of Report:

21 May 2014, Manager of Community Services was notified of a revised Service Agreement for the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP).

 

This service; funded by the Department of Housing and Public Works commenced prior to amalgamation and under Maranoa Regional Council since, 15 March 2008. The current service agreement was due to expire 15 March 2015. This expiry date has been brought forward with a new agreement taking effect 1 October 2014.

 

SAAP funding supports a full time Housing Officer position, to implement individual case management plans for tenants.  These tenants are defined as homeless or at risk of homelessness and are provided with temporary and short term accommodation (1-13 weeks duration).

 

The aim of this position is to provide individual support; building capacity to manage self care and re-enter mainstream housing. Assistance is delivered on a case by case basis, based on individual need and can include;

·    help with lodging a bond application,

·    referral to appropriate internal and external services,

·    resume writing, financial counselling, and

·    sourcing long term affordable housing (within and outside the region).

 

Further to this role is the administration of tenant allocations and day to day operational management of the crisis properties under the Crisis Accommodation Program (CAP) through the Department of Housing and Public Works. 

 

Maranoa Regional Council leases under the CAP program, eight units and two houses, all located in Roma. New leasing agreements are due, for these properties however, have not yet been made available.

 

The two programs, SAAP and CAP operate in synergy however; are delivered under two different service agreements and governing bodies. The two Departments are currently collaborating to offer a combined agreement however; this is not likely to occur until September 2015. 

 

Notable changes within the revised service agreement include;

 

Amendment 1. Extending the length of accommodation stay for tenants for “as long as the client requires to secure and maintain sustainable housing”.

 

The rationale behind this amendment is to allow adequate time for support and behavioral change, resulting in better outcomes and reduced risk of future homelessness. Whilst the outcome is noteworthy; it is important to highlight that we already experience a bottleneck effect (that being demand greatly outweighs supply). This is due to the limited number of social housing stock and exit pathways we have available here in the region and beyond.  Currently the average length of time for crisis accommodation is 16 weeks.

 

Amendment 2. Limited length of Service Agreement duration (from 1 October 2014 till 30 September 2015). After this date, SAAP will go out to open tender.

 

This reform is part of the Homelessness to Housing Strategy 2020. “Government partners engage with and invest in, non government providers and the community services sector to deliver integrated outcomes for individuals, families and communities.”

 

Further amendments to the service agreement included the implementation of an accreditation framework and an increase (minimum %) in outputs, outcomes and targets. These revised components could be met and would be managed accordingly. 

 

Points to consider:

Table 1: Pros and Cons if SAAP and CAP remain under Council management

 

PROS

CONS

Staff retention (Housing Officer position)

Potential political cost to Council

Ability to meet requirements:

·    Standards, quality assurances

·    Outputs, outcomes and targets

Inability to source further funding options for service delivery under Local Government

Ability to provide short, mid and long-term support to vulnerable groups

Potential reduction in number of individuals assisted

Ability to provide short, mid and long-term affordable, safe and secure shelter for vulnerable groups

Potential financial cost to Council long-term

 

Table 2: Individuals assisted by age group 1 July 2013 till 22 May 2014 (11 months)

 

Age group (years)

Frequency

Percentage (%)

0-2

17

15

3-5

14

12.4

6-9

8

7.1

10-14

8

7.1

15 -16

0

0

17-19

9

8

20-24

16

14.2

25-29

11

9.7

30-34

7

6.2

40- 54

8

7.1

55-75

4

3.6

Total

113

100

 

Availability of crisis accommodation is limited. The total number of unassisted persons for this period (n = 596). This figure represents the total number of times an individual has requested crisis accommodation assistance and the agency was unable to assist. Vacancy of these premises is only for times of cleaning and maintenance. There is no other service of its kind in the region.

 

Further intelligence to support crisis accommodation demand within the region includes recent meetings with local stakeholders (Anglicare, St Vincent de Paul, Queensland Health, Centacare and Maranoa Regional Council’s Community Housing and Community Support services) which have highlighted a need for immediate, short term accommodation (eg. 24 – 48 hour) for acute situations (eg. mental health persons) with support services and clinical expertise attached.

 

A scenario; all community and social services are experiencing more frequently and are unable to assist adequately or appropriately. However, partnerships between government and non government sectors are developing and exploring “out of the box” solutions with issues such as these is fast becoming the norm.

 

Evidence for Supported Accommodation Assistance and Crisis Accommodation Programs for this region is strong. Approval to submit under the new agreement to continue these services is required, due 10 June 2014.

 

Consultation (internal/external):

Sharon Frank – Director Corporate, Commercial and Community Services, Maranoa Regional Council

Margaret Langton – Coordinator Community and Council Housing, Maranoa Regional Council

Lorretta Aisthorpe – Senior Housing Officer, Maranoa Regional Council

Rose Hogarth - Services Officer Community Housing Provider Management and Development, Department of Housing and Public Works

Patricia Puzzi – Acting Manager Community Housing and Homelessness, Department of Housing and Public Works

Tonia Jackson – Services Officer Community Housing and Homelessness, Department of Housing and Public Works

Risk Assessment (Legal, Financial, Political etc.):

Political – Potential loss of crisis/ temporary accommodation for vulnerable groups within the region, if the service is not desirable to another external provider.

Policy Implications:

Nil

Financial Resource Implications:

SAAP 2013/2014

Total Income 2013/2014 = $135, 399

Total Expenditure 2013/2014 = Service will utilise the full amount by 30 June 2014

(if we do not expend a full quarter of funding then the Department adjusts and withholds funding from the next quarter).

CAP 2013/2014

Total Income (Rental revenue only) =                             $ 61, 750

Total Expenditure

·    Approved maintenance budget =                         $ 30, 404

(Maintenance, cleaning costs and grounds)

·    Utilities =                                                               $ 23, 839

(Electrical, rates and charges)

·    Extra employee costs =                                         $19, 148 

(10 hours/ ftn for Property Management)

·    Audit fees =                                                            $       900

·    Plant Hire=                                                             $   4, 750

 

 

CAP Total Expenditure to date Actuals =                         $ 62, 276

Budget review (Q3) required expenditure=                      $ 82, 351

Therefore, a potential deficit 2013/2014 =                       $ 20, 601

 

Note 1: We have reserves for CAP properties however, would need to seek approval from Department to cover this overspend.

Note 2: We currently receive no funds from SAAP or CAP service funding for white ware and household goods, this service relies on donations to meet client need.

 

 

Link to Corporate Plan:

Corporate Plan 2009-2013 8.4.8(b) To provide or assist with the attainment of crisis housing for residents who are experiencing difficulties securing appropriate accommodation.

Supporting Documentation:

1View

Homelessless Program Guidelines

D14/36560

2View

Service Agreement (Part C)-Specificagtions for Community and Homelessness Services

D14/36561

3View

Service_Agreement_Standard_Terms V1 0 30April2014

D14/36563

 

Report authorised by:

Sharon Frank, Director - Corporate, Community & Commercial Services


Attachment 1

Homelessless Program Guidelines

 

 

 

 

Homelessness Program Guidelines

May 2014

 

Version 2


Attachment 1

Homelessless Program Guidelines

 

Table of Contents

1       Introduction. 3

2       Context. 3

2.1         Homelessness to Housing 2020 Strategy. 3

2.2         Funding for homelessness services. 4

2.3         Queensland Homelessness Information Platform (QHIP) 4

2.4         Human Services Quality Framework. 4

2.5         Underlying Approaches to Service Delivery. 5

3       Homelessness Program... 6

3.1         Program Aim.. 6

3.2         Homelessness program funding logic. 6

3.3         Program Eligibility. 7

4       Service details. 8

4.1         Service types and sub-types. 8

4.2         Service users. 13

4.3         Service Deliverables. 14

5       Service delivery requirements. 19

5.1         Generic requirements for all homelessness services. 19

5.2         Requirements for specific service categories. 20

5.3         Requirements for specific service types. 20

5.4         Requirements for specific service sub-types. 21

5.5         Requirements for specific service user groups. 22

5.6         Reporting Requirements. 22

5.7         Special Conditions. 24

6       Contact information. 24

Appendix 1:       GLOSSARY. 25

Appendix  2         Performance reporting. 28

 


Introduction

The purpose of the Homelessness Program Guidelines is to provide departmental staff and funded organisations with information regarding the aims and purpose of Homelessness Programs and its operational requirements and expectations.

The Guidelines will support improvements to the homelessness service system through providing clear and consistent information about the aims of funding provided under the Homelessness Program and the principles and elements that must underpin service delivery for people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. The content reflects contemporary service delivery based on the available evidence.

2  Context

2.1            Homelessness to Housing 2020 Strategy

There are significant challenges to delivering housing and homelessness assistance to the thousands of Queenslanders in need. The Queensland Government is responding to these challenges by introducing major reforms to the way assistance is provided.

Together, these reforms aim to deliver on the Government’s vision of a robust social services industry that can meet the increasing demand for assistance in innovative ways. The outcome will be better integration of housing, homelessness, and other support services, in order to maximise opportunities for Queenslanders in need.

The reforms also aim to enhance, simplify and tailor homelessness support services and to better integrate these services with longer term housing responses to establish a well-coordinated and effective homelessness-to-housing system.

The following principles guide how Government partners and engages with, and invests in, non-government providers and the community services sector to deliver integrated outcomes for individuals, families and communities:

1.   The State will obtain the best possible value for money by investing in local area housing strategies which meet both government priorities and community need;

2.   The State will facilitate contestability through testing the market to see if services can be delivered more innovatively and efficiently by the non-Government sector

3.   Government agencies, non-government providers, the community services sector, the private sector, and the community will collaborate on the development of integrated, outcomes focussed and innovative solutions centred around identified local housing need;

4.   The State will demonstrate accountability and transparency in decision-making and performance, including clearly defined service outcomes and the rationale for funding decisions and contracting requirements;

5.   Non-government providers and the community services sector understand the Government’s reform agenda and are supported to make informed decisions on their future role and participation.

There is an over representation of people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds in all forms of homelessness and use of homelessness services. Homelessness service delivery and service models need to enhance access and be responsive to this group.

2.2            Funding for homelessness services

Funding is provided by both the Queensland and Commonwealth Governments through the National Affordable Housing Agreement and the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness.

2.3            Queensland Homelessness Information Platform (QHIP)

The Department of Housing and Public Works has implemented the Queensland Homelessness Information Platform (QHIP), an electronic database that incorporates the Vacancy Capacity Management System (VCMS) and the Common Homelessness Assessment and Referral Tool (CHART).

QHIP is used to manage referrals to specialist homelessness services through a centralised database that enables service providers to access client information without the need for clients to have to repeat their story to multiple service providers in order to receive assistance.

QHIP enables people experiencing homelessness to more readily access and move through the homelessness service system and enable service providers to:

·    provide improved services and pathways for clients

·    reduce the number of referrals

·    enable clear, transparent and consistent processes for client prioritisation

·    enable a consistent approach to initial assessment across the service system

·    provide efficient yet secure processes to share client assessment information

 

Please refer to appendix 4 for the QHIP policy with which funded services must comply.

2.4            Human Services Quality Framework

The intent of the Human Services Quality Framework (HSQF) is to create a streamlined and client focussed quality framework for human services that facilitates continuous quality improvement. This streamlined approach will reduce duplication and administration and compliance costs for service providers and enable organisations which deliver services in multiple regions and/or across multiple service streams to be assessed under a single organisational level audit.

 

The HQSF is administered by the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services.    For more information on the HSQF,  please refer to http://www.communities.qld.gov.au/gateway/funding-and-grants/human-services-quality-framework.

 

Funded services must comply as included in the terms of the service agreement.

2.5           
Underlying Approaches to Service Delivery

2.5.1                         Housing First

A housing first approach transitions a person or household, wherever possible, straight from homelessness into stable, long term housing, with support provided where necessary to sustain the tenancy.  This approach minimises vulnerable people having to be moved through multiple short-term, temporary living situations which can be unsettling and prevent their stabilisation.

Many housing first initiatives target rough sleepers and/or people experiencing chronic homelessness, but the principles of housing first can be incorporated into other parts of the specialist homelessness service continuum with different target groups.

These principles include:

·    Accessing housing as quickly as possible, with ongoing support provided (where needed) to establish and consolidate the new tenancy 

·    Minimising moves between multiple short-term accommodation arrangements

·    Providing tenancy sustainment support to keep people housed

·    Working with other service providers to deliver coordinated services once housed

·    Connecting clients with mainstream services to provide ongoing support directed at helping them to sustain their tenancy

·    Facilitating connections to local community and social supports to build community connectedness and reduce social isolation.

 

There are some people who have an ongoing need for personal and social support that cannot be met by a specialist homelessness service.  It is essential that specialist homelessness services connect people with the appropriate long-term support through mainstream and allied services such as mental health or disability services and community facilities like neighbourhood centres.

2.5.2                         Duration of Need

A duration of need approach means providing accommodation and/or support for as long as the client requires to secure and maintain sustainable housing.  It is based on a person’s assessed need rather than an arbitrary time limit. Ongoing assessment determines a client’s changing needs and, once housed, clients should be connected with mainstream services to provide ongoing support directed at helping them to sustain their tenancy.

The principles supporting a duration of need approach include:

·    Specialist homelessness services provide temporary support and supported accommodation

·    In line with a housing first approach, the stay in supported accommodation should be as short as possible, with transition to longer term housing as the goal

·    A focus on addressing client needs in the context of case management, and doing ‘whatever it takes’ to access housing

·    Regular and ongoing assessment of need

·    Supporting the client to find, establish and be able to sustain independent housing

·    Ensuring that the client has the community, social and agency support needed to sustain them in independent housing

·    Encouraging clients to be self-reliant by providing them with the skills necessary to obtain the services they require and to avoid dependency on homelessness services. 


Homelessness Program

3.1            Program Aim

The Homelessness Program aims to reduce the number of people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless in Queensland by funding services that assist people to:

·    obtain housing

·    maintain their housing

·    maximise their capacity to be independent, self reliant and connected to appropriate social and community supports.

 

3.2            Homelessness program funding logic

ProgramLogicHomelessnessProgramsFunding_includingService Types_080811vsd

The Homelessness Program funding logic is underpinned by a number of assumptions and success is dependent on external factors outlined below.

Assumptions

·    Assisting people to address the issues that put them at risk of homelessness will result in fewer people becoming homeless

·    Assisting people once they have become homeless, through support and accommodation, will reduce the numbers of people who are homeless

·    A more effective and better integrated specialist homelessness service system will result in better outcomes for people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness

 

External factors

External factors  such as the supply of affordable housing, the economic climate and discrimination on the basis of race, age or ability may impact on the achievement of successful outcomes.

3.3            Program Eligibility

Services are provided to people who are:

·    Homeless or at imminent risk of homelessness, for example, someone who is living in their car temporally with a friend, or a person who has been given week to leave their current housing.    

·    Housed but at risk of homelessness, for example, a family who are struggling to maintain a tenancy after emergency hospitalisation or losing a job. 

 

For the purposes of these guidelines a person is homeless if they are living in:

·    improvised dwellings or 'sleeping rough'

·    short-term or emergency accommodation

·    temporary arrangements without security of tenure, for example staying with friends or relatives, in boarding houses or motels

·    unsafe or inadequate accommodation, for example where domestic/family violence or abuse threatens the person’s safety or there is severe overcrowding.

 

(This is based on the definitions used by the Australian Bureau of Statistics and the Australian Institute for Health and Welfare.)


Service details

4.1            Service types and sub-types

The Homelessness Service Delivery Framework provides a menu of service types, or ‘building blocks’, from which services can be designed to meet identified needs. 

The main service categories are:

·    Access

·    Support

·    Supported accommodation and housing.

 

Service type

Service sub type

Service particulars

Access: Facilitating access to the specialist homelessness service system and related services to people who are who are homeless, at imminent risk of homelessness, housed but at risk of homelessness.

ST1

Centre based Access

Services provided face to face at a centre based location which provide access, assessment and appropriate referral.

Example: Day centres, service hubs, drop in centres.  

 

Not applicable

 

ST2

Outreach Access

Services which actively initiate face to face contact with people in public spaces and other locations to provide access, assessment and appropriate referral.

Example: Outreach services to people in public space

 

Not applicable

 

ST3

Virtual Access

Services which provide access, assessment and appropriate referral via the telephone or the internet

Example: Call centres

 

 

 

Not applicable

 

SupportServices providing case management support to people who are homeless, at imminent risk of homelessness, housed but at risk of homelessness.

All support services will have one or more of the following goals:

·      to prevent a client from losing a tenancy that is at risk (early intervention)

·      to transition a client from homelessness to being housed, and/or

·    to support a client to maintain a tenancy and prevent the tenancy from becoming at risk (prevention/tenancy sustainment).

 

ST4

Centre Based Support

Services provided face to face at a centre based location that is accessible to the target group.

 

Example: One stop shop, service hub or drop in centre.

 

Excludes: Services that only offer basic requirements of living without providing client support and case management.

 

Not applicable

 

ST5

Mobile Support

Services that provide case management support to people either in their own home, in temporary living situations, in supported housing , in a community setting, or  in public space. 

 

 

Examples: Homelessness early intervention services, outreach support to people in public spaces or support provided to people staying temporarily in a motel.  Includes support component of supported housing.

 

 

Not applicable

Mobile support services will be provided in one or more of the following locations:

·      ‘In their own home’ includes private rental, social housing, boarding houses or in share houses.

·      ‘In temporary living situations’ includes any temporary accommodation setting for example motels or living with family/friends.

·      ’Community setting’ includes places where services meet with people they support, for example local library, coffee shop, recreation centre, neighbourhood centre.

·      ‘Public space’ refers to places where people are sleeping rough, including parks, streets and improvised dwellings and support to this group should take a housing first approach.

 

Supported Accommodation and Housing

Supported accommodation is used to describe the provision of temporary shelter to a homeless client.

Supported housing is used to describe the provision of support to clients in both private and social housing settings.

ST6

Temporary supported accommodation

Services that provide case management support combined with temporary accommodation.

ST7

Immediate Supported Accommodation

Immediate Supported Accommodation provides immediate case management support in temporary accommodation and follow up support during transition to housing.

 

Examples: Shelters, refuges, families crisis accommodation, 'hostels'.

 

Supported accommodation is delivered in a number of properties to be detailed in the service agreement in the format provided.

All temporary supported accommodation properties will be linked to an identified level (H/M/L)  that reflects the supervision/staff presence applied:

·      High – staff will be on site at all times on awake or sleep shift at nights

·      Medium – staff will be on site for some shifts whilst other hours are covered by on call / return to work arrangements

·      Low - staff are not based on site.

 

 

 

ST8

Transitional Supported Accommodation

(Applicable only for services targeting young people)

Temporary accommodation provided specifically for young people with case management support that include specific programs/activities directed at developing clients' skills at independent living and maintaining tenancies.  

Example: 'Share house' accommodation services for young people.

 

ST9

Supported housing

Services that provide case management support combined with social housing (longer term and tenured)

Examples: Common Ground, supported housing models

ST10

On-site

Services that provide case management support to people within a housing complex or single building with workers based in the building

 

ST11

Off-site

Services that provide case management support to people within housing complex or single building by workers who are not based in the building

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Service System Support and Development

Services aimed at developing and facilitating improved quality of specialist homelessness services provided to clients and/or the efficiency, effectiveness and cost effectiveness of service provision.

ST12

Coordination/Network development

Activities that build the capacity of specialist homelessness services to strengthen integrated working relationships between providers according to the identified level of client need.

Excludes: Day to day networking and coordination activities with other services to support normal client service delivery is assumed for all service types.

 

 

 

ST13

Service support and development

Activities that assist services to improve and develop service delivery, including providing specialist advice, developing resources, providing opportunities for information and skill-sharing

 

 

 

 

4.2           
Service users

Service user groups is the term used to describe the group/s that the service is funded to target for assistance. The term service user is used interchangeably with the term client in this document.  Service users are specified within one or more broad service user groups. 

4.2.1                         Broad service user group

The two broad service user groups for homelessness are:

·    people who are homeless or at imminent risk of homelessness (U60), and/or

·    people who are housed but at risk of homelessness (U70)

 

4.2.2                         Service user groups

Services may be provided to homeless people or people at risk of homelessness:

·    across all service user groups (generalist - SU5), or

·    to multiple service user groups (to be listed), or

·    they may be provided exclusively to a single service user group.

The service user groups for homelessness are as follows:

Service user code

Service User Groups

All services will have at least one of the following Service User Groups

SU1

Adults

SU2

Families

SU3

Women and children escaping domestic/family violence

SU4

Young people

SU5

Generalist - all service user groups

SU6

Multiple - selected service user groups

Service user code

Service User Sub-groups

Services may be funded to support the following sub-groups of the above Service User Groups

SU7

Men

SU8

Women

SU9

Experiencing chronic homelessness

SU10

Young men

SU11

Young women

SU12

Young families

SU13

Who are rough sleeping/living in improvised dwellings

SU14

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

SU15

From culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds

SU16

Older people

SU17

Who are engaged in education /training

                                                                                                                          

Service user group definitions are provided in the Glossary (Appendix 1) and applicable service user specific requirements are detailed in Section 5.2.

4.2.3                         Geographic catchment

The geographic catchment describes the area where services are delivered, if mobile, or where eligible clients are located. It is not the same as the service location.

It will be based on where the need for services is highest and will usually reflect natural community boundaries and connections and the movement of people. It will be limited by resources and appropriateness for service delivery e.g. it is not advisable to have a service that targets people in another location if the service is centre-based and there is no natural connection between the two locations and no public transport.

For ease of mapping geographic catchment,  service agreements will use either Local Government Areas (LGAs) for catchment boundaries or Statistical Area 2 (SA2) level. SA2 maps are available on the Australian Bureau of Statistics website.

4.3            Service Deliverables

The deliverables required from services are expressed as outcomes and outputs.  Outcomes are goals or results that are delivered by funding outputs. The outputs are products and services through which outcomes are delivered.  Minimum service targets are established for both outcomes and outputs. Where possible, all performance measures use data already collected by services. Refer to Appendix 2 for Counting rules.

The outcome targets are based on the need to achieve outcomes for clients and informed by evidence from existing services. These are initial targets that will be tested and reviewed over time.

Failure to achieve the minimum targets will trigger a compliance response from the Department  under a Performance and Compliance framework across all housing services.  Mitigating circumstances such as natural disasters would be considered in this response. 

4.3.1                        
Outcomes and targets

Service User

Service Category

Outcome measurement

Outcome

Outcome measure

Annual Target

All

groups

Support

Services

Clients are assessed and appropriate support needs are identified at first contact

OMO1

Number of eligible presentations that result in an assessment.

Minimum 90%

(from QHIP)

OMO2

Number of Case Management/Support Plans established at first contact  for clients identified as having an on-going support need.

(Duration of support is specified in Case Management/Support Plan, with review as circumstances change)

Minimum 90% Case Management/Support Plans closed within the duration of need identified in the Case Management/Support Plan

(Manual collection)

All Services

Clients resolve the issues that impede accessing or  maintaining housing

 

OMO3

 

Number and percentage of support periods closed during the quarter where a case management plan was in place.

Minimum 90%

(From SHSC)

OMO4

 

Number and percentage of support periods closed during the quarter where a case management plan was in place and half or more of the case goals had been met.

Minimum 75%

(From SHSC)

Clients are housed at the end of support.

OMO5

Number and percentage of support periods that ended with the client housed in secure and sustainable housing.

Support periods represent the period of time a client receives services from an agency.

Minimum 60%

(From SHSC)

 

4.3.2                        
Outputs and targets

Outputs are measured using the following measures.  These are expressed as a minimum per annum. Outputs are determined in line with the size and service type and level of funding.

Service Users

Service Category

Service type

Output measurement

Output

Output measure

All target groups

Access

Centre based Access

A01.2.02

Needs assessment and management of case/service plans

Number of hours of needs assessment and management of case/service plans provided and number of clients who received this output.

Outreach Access

Virtual Access

Support

Centre Based Support

Mobile Support

Supported Accommodation and Housing

Temporary supported accommodation

A05.4.01

Temporary supported accommodation places provided to clients

Number of places of temporary supported accommodation and number of clients who received this output.

Supported housing

 

A01.2.02

Needs assessment and management of case/service plans

Number of hours of needs assessment and management of case/service plans provided and number of clients who received this output.

 

4.3.3                         Calculating Deliverables

4.3.3.1             Hours 

In calculating the quantity of hours to be delivered, services are asked to consider:

·    The number of positions (or part thereof) providing direct service delivery to clients.  This does not include managerial, supervisory or administrative positions that are not involved in direct service delivery.

·    The proportion of the worker’s time spent working directly with clients such as undertaking initial assessments, providing housing assistance and advocacy or providing emotional and practical support.

·    The proportion of time spent working on behalf of clients such as arranging a referral, writing case notes, participating in case conferences and recording data at time of assessment

·    ‘Indirect’ time such as travel (without a client in the vehicle), team meetings, training, networking meetings, professional supervision, and administrative tasks or supervising staff is not included.

It is expected that the quantity of funded hours be consistent amongst like service types but it is acknowledged that variation may occur depending on a range of factors such as the target group assisted or the geographic location in which the service is provided.

When reporting on hours, services are required to report on the time spent working directly with or on behalf of clients.

4.3.3.2             Places

The department calculates the target by counting the number of accommodation nights available to clients over the counting period. The number of funded places should be the same as the usual capacity of your service. This will match the minimum units of accommodation listed in the service agreement. 

The department does not exclude places where rooms, properties or beds are temporarily unavailable, e.g. due to repairs or a critical incident. The annual total of places available is not adjusted in these circumstances.

The annual total number of places available is the number of accommodation units multiplied by the number of nights per annum.

Example:

The total number of places available is the number of accommodation units multiplied by the number of nights in the counting period.

A supported accommodation service has accommodation places for 6 people per night or 6 units of accommodation. The number of accommodation nights in the quarter is 91. So the total number of places available is: 6 x 91 = 546.

A Families supported accommodation service has 12 units of accommodation/properties available for homeless families.

The properties range from two bedroom flats to four bedroom houses. In general one family is accommodated in each property. Count one accommodation unit for each property.

4.3.3.3             Clients

Client targets are applied to all direct service delivery service types.

Client targets are calculated based on estimated capacity of the service at any one time multiplied by the average turnover of clients per annum.

The target number of clients, where hours is the output measure, is calculated as follows:

Multiply the client to worker ratio by the number of workers by the average client turnover per annum.

Example

·      Two mobile support workers support an average of 10 clients each at any one time.

·      On average clients are supported for 4 months, which equates to an average client turnover of 3 per annum.

·      The client target is: 10 (clients) x 2 (workers) x 3 (turnovers) = 60 clients per annum.

The target number of clients, where places is the output measure, is calculated as follows:

Multiply the number of funded places by the average turnover per annum multiplied by the minimum number of clients accommodated per place at any one time.

Example

·      A temporary supported accommodation service has 5 funded places at any one time.

·      The average length of stay per client is 6 months, which equates to an average client turnover of twice per annum.

·      The client target is: 5 (places) x 2 (turnover) x 1 (clients per place) = 10 clients per annum.

When reporting on clients, services are required to count the number of individual clients supported during the quarter, in accordance with the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection. 

Services are required to count clients whose support periods commenced, closed or were ongoing during the quarter.

If a client has two support periods during the quarter they are counted as one client.

Example 1

During the counting period an agency has 25 clients (including children) whose support periods are closed and five who are still receiving a service. The total number of clients for the quarter is 30.

Example 2

A family of five are accommodated and are counted as five clients.

Example 3

A family of five seek support. The adults are assisted to access accommodation and one child receives support. The two remaining children do not receive support – count as three clients.

Client targets are calculated based on a turnover figure to reflect the average potential duration of stay based on like services and evidence of good practice.  It is acknowledged that the actual duration of stay averages may be different due a range of factors. 

Where factors impact on the service’s ability to achieve client targets outside of allowable tolerances, services are required to provide an explanation through output reporting.

It is not expected that services exit clients from accommodation before support needs are met in order to meet client targets. It is also acknowledged that support may extend beyond the duration of stay.

 

 

5  Service delivery requirements

Services that are funded by the department under homelessness must adhere to the statements identified in this section. These statements form part of the contractual requirements in a service agreement with the department.

5.1            Generic requirements for all homelessness services

Case management

All homelessness services will use a case management approach (See Appendix 1: Glossary of Terms for definition of case management) to service delivery with individuals or groups that is directed at achieving a housing outcome for all clients, that includes: 

·    Initial and ongoing assessment of client needs

·    Initial and ongoing risk assessment and safety planning, as needed

·    Emotional and practical support

·    Advocacy and assistance to access housing and specialist services for example, drug or alcohol, mental health, legal, domestic and family violence support, budgeting and debt management and any other mainstream services

·    Facilitating social contact with family and friends and forming new social networks, as needed

·    Facilitating access to education, volunteering, employment and leisure activities

·    Cooperate and coordinate with other services, and where appropriate collaborate and integrate service delivery, in order to support positive housing outcomes for clients.

·    Maximise the use of available mainstream and community resources, including social, to ensure sustainability of client outcomes.

5.1.1                         Accessibility

All homelessness services will:

·    Be flexible and sensitive to the needs of individual clients, and the target group through the design and delivery of services (operating hours, practices, and rules).

·    Operate with low or no entry requirements for clients: for example, not restrict access to any part of the service on the basis of client’s capacity to pay; and not make generic or blanket exclusions to the service, rather consider each situation and assess any risk on a case by case basis.

·    Adopt a risk management framework for dealing with clients that have challenging behaviours with the intent of developing alternative processes for managing these clients rather than excluding them.

5.1.2                         Client practice

All homelessness services will:

·      Where possible, not exit any client into homelessness.

·      Provide support that is proactive, persistent, reliable, practical and comprehensive.

·      Be provided in a manner that is respectful of the dignity and privacy of individuals

·      Provide services in ways that minimise the client’s dependency on homelessness services and maximises their capacity for independent living.

·      Provide respectful and flexible services that are appropriate to the range of CALD groups in the service catchment.

·      Adopt policies and practices that enhance access and are culturally appropriate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

5.2            Requirements for specific service categories

5.2.1                         Access services (ST1-3)

All homelessness access services will:

·      Deliver case management to each client through:

·      Initial assessment of client needs

·      Initial risk assessment and safety planning, as needed

·      Meet immediate needs

·      Emotional and practical support

·      Advocacy and assistance to access housing and specialist homelessness services and any other mainstream services.

·      Provide information, assessment and facilitated intake and referral to the specialist homelessness service system or related service systems.

·      Provide support until appropriate referral is completed.

·      Maintain contact with clients until an appropriate referral is completed, and, in the absence of a successful referral, provide support and an interim response where possible.

5.3            Requirements for specific service types

5.3.1                            Outreach access (ST2)

All mobile access services will:

·      Initiate contact with people who are homeless in public spaces and other locations with respectful and culturally appropriate engagement and assessment practices.

·      Provide assessment and facilitate intake and referral to the specialist homelessness service system. 

·      Provide the necessary number of contacts and practical assistance to facilitate confidence and trust between the service and client to achieve assessment and facilitated intake and referral.

·      Assist homeless people in public space and other locations.

5.3.2                            Centre based support (ST4)

All homelessness centre based services will:

·      Be delivered face to face at a centre based location.

·      Provide a welcoming, friendly and provide a safe and supportive environment that is easily accessible and culturally sensitive.

·      Be close to public transport, easy to contact via phone and online information.

·      Open at hours that suit the client group for drop-in visits and appointments in location/s where they are needed.

·      Be broadly publicised as appropriate to the target group and referral agencies.

 

5.3.3                         Temporary Supported Accommodation (ST6, ST7, ST8)

Funding is provided for support which is intrinsically linked with provision of temporary accommodation. These requirements relate only to the support component of the service provision.

Properties to be used for temporary supported accommodation may be provided or funded through the Crisis Accommodation Program (Department of Housing and Public Works) or through another source (e.g. auspice or Council owned).

Organisations funded for provision and management of the accommodation will be required to comply with any relevant regulations or requirements related to that funding   Supported accommodation services that have CAP properties or CAP head leases will have a separate service agreement for the CAP component of the service. 

All supported accommodation services will:

·      Temporarily meet both the accommodation and support needs of clients.

·      Provide good quality accommodation with capacity for client privacy and, wherever possible, a home-like atmosphere.

·      Support the client to resolve the immediate crisis.

·      Respond in a timely manner to all referrals and client needs.

·      Keep vacancies to a minimum and provide a level of support to all referrals.

·      Not keep a waiting list for supported accommodation.

·      Exit clients into independent housing/accommodation as soon as possible.

·      Provide follow up support to clients who have exited temporary supported accommodation.

·      Advise the department of any changes to accommodation/property component of service provision as this may have an impact on the capacity of the funded service to deliver the agreed service.

5.4            Requirements for specific service sub-types

5.4.1                         Transitional supported accommodation (ST8 )

All transitional supported accommodation services will:

·    Deliver specific planned activities/programs aimed at developing clients' independent living and tenancy sustainment skills.

·    Immediate access to these services may not always be possible as access may require planning and specific assessment/matching of clients.

5.5            Requirements for specific service user groups

5.5.1                         For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children in remote communities

Services with this specific service user group operate in unique environments where achievement of housing outcomes may be limited.  Services will provide an immediate response to homelessness, where clients don’t have access to a safe and secure home due to experiences of domestic and family violence.  They may also offer a support response to people where there is a risk they may not have access to a safe and secure home due to domestic and family violence (past, current or predicted). 

It is not expected that the service will be staffed on a 24 hours 7 days a week basis. The service will identify the times of greatest need and service delivery will be prioritised for these times.

As such, staff will work outside business hours and night shifts, be on-call outside business hours and at night and return to work outside business hours and at night as required.

Whilst client targets will not be set for this service user group, the service will report on outputs provided.  The service will collect information regarding the daily client usage of the accommodation in the format provided. The report will be uploaded to OASIS at the end of the specified period. The information collected may assist the calculation of client targets in the future.

5.6            Reporting Requirements 

5.6.1                         Data collection, reporting and evaluation

All homelessness services will

·    meet all data collection requirements as notified by the department from time to time, including (without limitation) the submission of monthly data to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare for the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection (SHSC) and any amendment to, or replacement of, those requirements.

·    Participate, as requested by the department, in all performance monitoring and evaluation processes.

Performance measurement reporting

Services will collect and report on the following performance measures relating to the services to be provided using the counting rules as described in Appendix 2.



Service  User code

Service  type code

Service  sub-type code

Measure

Outcome measures

 

All Service User Groups

ST4 and 5

_

OMO1

Number and percentage of eligible presentations  that result in an assessment.

ST4 and 5

-

OMO2

Number of Case Management/Support Plans established at first contact  for clients identified as having an on-going support need
(Duration of support is specified in Case Management/Support Plan, with review as circumstances change)

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

OMO3

Number and percentage of support periods closed during the quarter where a case management plan was in place.

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

OMO4

Number and percentage of support periods closed during the quarter where case management plans were in place and half or more of the case management goals had been met

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

OMO5

Number and percentage of support periods that ended with the client housed in secure and sustainable housing.



Output measures

All Service User Groups

ST1-5

ST9

ST10-11

AO1.2.02

Number of hours of needs assessment and management of case/service plans provided and number of clients who received this output.

ST6

ST7-8

AO5.4.01

Number of places of temporary supported accommodation and number of clients who received this output.


Throughput measures

 

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS112

Number of support periods that commenced during the quarter

S1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS120

Number of open support periods

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS111

Number of support periods that ended during the quarter


Demographic measures

SU2,SU3,SU4,SU5,SU6

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS110

Number of individual clients who are children

All Service User Groups   

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS35

Number of clients identifying as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander

All Service User Groups   

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS39

Number of clients identifying as being from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse backgrounds

SU13 only

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS118

Number of new support periods where the client identified as sleeping rough or in non-conventional accommodation immediately before presentation

SU9  only

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS119

Number of new clients who are experiencing chronic homelessness immediately before support



Other measures

All Service User Groups   

Only where funded for brokerage

Only where funded for brokerage

IS117

Number of clients where brokerage was provided

All Service User Groups    

Only where funded for brokerage

Only where funded for brokerage

IS61

Provision of brokerage report in specified format.    

All Service User Groups   

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS63

Provision of up to three brief case studies that demonstrate client experiences and outcomes.

 

5.7            Special Conditions

<Insert when response received from legals>

6  Contact information

For any further information regarding this funding area, please contact the homelessness team through the mailbox:

_homelessness_office@communities.qld.gov.au

 


Appendix 1:        GLOSSARY

 

Specialist homelessness services (SHS)

Services that are funded specifically to assist people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness across Australia.

Case management

 

Case management is a mandatory service approach for all services as it puts identifying and responding to the client’s expressed needs at the centre of all aspects of service delivery.

The main elements of case management are:

1.         Entry/Screening

2.         Assessment

3.         Planning

4.         Direct Service

5.         Co-ordination (including referral)

6.         Monitoring and Review

7.         Exit Planning, Case Plan Closure and Follow-up

8.         Evaluation

 

It is an approach that can be tailored to all service types and delivery models. It is not related to the intensity of support provided or the length of relationship with a client.   It may be intensive and comprehensive, or an abbreviated or compressed version, for example in access services.

Client

A client is a person who directly receives a specialist homelessness service. This definition is based on the definition of a client as used in the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection. It includes children as long as they directly receive a service and are not just a beneficiary of service delivery.

Note: client and service user are used interchangeably.

Service user group

Service user group is the term used to describe the group/s that the service is funded to target for assistance. The term service user may be used interchangeably with the term client.

Families

A family is a group of two or more people who usually live in the same household and who are related to each other biologically or through another family relationship such as adoption or fostering.  This includes one or more carers accompanied by one or more child/ren, couples (same sex or heterosexual), multi-generational families and can also include pregnant women.

Young People

Young people over school leaving age.  Services may stipulate specific age ranges within the 16-25 years age range.  In some circumstances services may accept clients below school leaving age but cannot target their services at this age group.

Women and Children escaping
domestic
and family violence

Women alone, or with children, who are homeless as a result of leaving a situation of domestic and family violence (as defined in the Domestic and Family Violence Protection Act 1989).

People from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds

People who are born overseas or who identify as a member of a cultural community based on language, ancestry, birthplace, religion and ethnic background.

Older People

People who are over the age of 60 years of age but with consideration to other people who may be experiencing, at an earlier age, the health and living restrictions that aging brings.

Rough Sleeping / Living in improvised
dwellings

Describes people who are sleeping, or bedded down, in the open air (such as on the streets, or in doorways, parks or bus shelters) and people in buildings or other places not designed for habitation (such as sheds, car parks, cars, derelict boats or stations).  This categorisation is based on a person’s location at a particular point in time.  Some people who are rough sleeping may be new to homelessness, may never have been homeless before, and may end up rough sleeping for a short time as a result of a crisis in their lives.  Others may experience occasional episodes of homelessness and others experience chronic homelessness.

People experiencing chronic homelessness

Describes people with an experience of homelessness that is long lasting or recurs over an extended period of time.  This includes people who have been homeless for more than 12 months or who have had repeat periods of homelessness over a period of 12 months or longer.  Chronic homelessness may include primary, secondary and tertiary homelessness at different times.  For example, a person may live on the streets for a time, live in boarding houses, stay with friends or use crisis accommodation at other times.  People who experience chronic homelessness are more likely to experience one or more of the following: a background of trauma and/or abuse, drug and/or alcohol addiction other disabilities or physical health problems, brain damage or intellectual disability, poor living skills, learning difficulties, unemployment, gambling addictions or family or domestic violence

Adults

Describes people who are over 18 years of age.

Cooperation

Often unstructured / informal relationships between two or more organisations that share information and may pool resources to deliver programs.  Shared purpose and parallel services.

Collaboration

 

Two or more service providers adopt a partnership approach to achieve common goals for a mutual client by sharing case management, case planning and/or service delivery.  People or agencies have a shared purpose, parallel services and clients in common develop agreed protocols to share knowledge and build consensus.  May include the appointment of a dedicated coordinator or manager.

Coordination

 

Structured relationship / partnership between two or more people or agencies to achieve complementary goals such as working together on a specific program.  Shared purpose, parallel services and clients in common.

Integration

Two or more organisations come together to form a single system with a common identity and outcome.  Common purpose, converging processes (continuity of service between organisations) and common client base.


Appendix  2               Performance reporting

 

1.   Performance Measures Counting Rules

Performance Measure

Counting Rule

Examples

Number of individual clients who are children.

For Children in Family, DV or Generalist Services.

Count the number of individual clients under the age of 18 who were supported during the quarter.

 

For Youth Services

Count the number of individual clients under the age of 16 who were supported during the quarter.

During the counting period an agency has 10 clients who were children whose support periods are closed and five who are still receiving a service. Count as 15 clients.

·      Children who receive a service, eg accommodation, are deemed clients

·      Children who do not DIRECTLY receive a service are NOT considered to be clients

·      For Youth services – children are considered to be persons under 16 years of age

SHIP OR OTHER CMS USERS:
You can use the reporting function in SHIP or other CMS data to generate this number.

PAPER FORM USERS:
You will need to count this number PRIOR to submitting your monthly data to SHOR so that you can total it at the end of the quarter.

Number of support periods that closed during the quarter.

Count the number of support periods that closed during the quarter.

 

If there are multiple support periods for an individual client, count each support period that has ended.

During the counting period an agency has 25 clients whose support period has ended and five who are still receiving a service.  One client had two separate support periods that are now both closed.  Count as  26.

SHIP OR OTHER CMS USERS:
You can use the reporting function in SHIP or other CMS data to generate this number.

PAPER FORM USERS:
You will need to count this number PRIOR to submitting your monthly data to SHOR so that you can total it at the end of the quarter.

Number of support periods that commenced during the quarter.

 

Count the number of support periods that commenced during the quarter.

 

If there are multiple support periods for an individual client, count each support period that commenced.

 

An agency has 10 clients whose support period commenced during the quarter.  It does not matter whether they are ongoing clients or their support period ended during the quarter.  One client had two support periods through the quarter.  One or both are now closed.  Count as 11.

SHIP OR OTHER CMS USERS:
You can use the reporting function in SHIP or other CMS data to generate this number.

PAPER FORM USERS:
You will need to count this number PRIOR to submitting your monthly data to SHOR so that you can total it at the end of the quarter.

Number of open support periods.

Count the number of open support periods as at the last day of each quarter.

On the last day of the quarter an agency has 10 clients whose support periods are still open. Count as 10.

SHIP OR OTHER CMS USERS:
You can use the reporting function in SHIP or other CMS data to generate this number.

PAPER FORM USERS:

You will need to total this information at the end of the quarter to determine the number of ongoing clients. This information can be tallied using the tick box at the top of Page 7 of the Initial Client Form or Page 1 of the Ongoing Client Form.

Number of Case Management/Support Plans established at first contact  for clients identified as having an on-going support need
(Duration of support is specified in Case Management/Support Plan, with review as circumstances change)

TBD based on the following:

Manual collection of the following during the quarter:

·      Number of case plans established at first contact

·      Estimate duration of need for each client and record

·      Record the number of case plans closed within the estimated duration.

 

TBD

Number and percentage of support periods closed during the quarter where a case management plan was in place.

 

 

 

(Note: The performance target for this measure is expressed as a percentage.)

Count the number of support periods closed during the quarter where the client had a case management plan in place.

AND

Express the number above as a % of the total number of support periods that closed during the quarter.

 

At the end of the counting period there were 15 ongoing clients with a case management plan in place.  There were 5 other clients who had had a case management plan but whose support period ended during the counting period.

Count the total of 5 clients.

SHIP OR OTHER CMS USERS:
Initially this information will need to be manually counted.  In time the data may be able to be extracted using the reporting function in SHIP or other CMS.

PAPER FORM USERS:
Relates to Section 2, Q5 on the Initial Client Form and Q5 on the Ongoing Client Form.

You will need to count this number PRIOR to submitting your monthly data to AIHW so that you can total it at the end of the quarter.

Number and percentage of support periods closed during the quarter where case management plans were in place and half or more of the case management goals had been met.

 

(Note: The performance target for this measure is expressed as a percentage.)

Count the number of support periods closed during the quarter where a case management plan was in place and the client had achieved half or more or all of their case management plan goals.

AND

Express the number above as a % of the total number of support periods that closed during the quarter where a case management plan was in place.

SHIP OR OTHER CMS USERS:
Initially this information will need to be manually counted.  In time the data may be able to be extracted using the reporting function in SHIP or other CMS.

PAPER FORM USERS:
Relates to Section 2, Q7 on the Initial Client Form and Q7 on the Ongoing Client Form.

You will need to count this number PRIOR to submitting your monthly data to AIHW so that you can total it at the end of the quarter.

 

Number and percentage of support periods that ended with the client housed in secure and sustainable housing.

 

(Note: The performance target for this measure is expressed as a percentage.)

 

Count the number of support periods closed during the counting period where the client’s tenure was one of the following categories (but not as couch surfers):

1  Renter – private housing

2  Renter – public housing

3  Renter – community housing

4  Renter – transitional housing

5  Renter – caravan Park

6  Renter – boarding/rooming house

8  Other renter

9  Rent free – private housing

10 Rent free – public housing

11 Rent free – community housing

12 Rent free – transitional housing

13 Rent free – caravan park

14 Rent free – boarding/rooming house

16 Other - rent free

17 Life tenure scheme

18 Owner – shared equity or rent/buy scheme

19 Owner – being purchased (with mortgage)

20 Owner – fully owned

21 Other tenure not elsewhere classified.

 

Categories 7, 15, 22 and 99 are not classified as secure and sustainable accommodation.

AND

Express the number above as a % of the total number of support periods that closed during the quarter.

A client who goes to stay with a family member and is sleeping on the couch is not considered to be housed.

A client who exits to no fixed abode is not considered to be housed.

A client who moves to a shelter or another form of emergency accommodation is not considered to be housed.

The number is derived by counting the number of clients in the categories listed less the number selected in these categories but also noted as couch surfer in the following question.

SHIP OR OTHER CMS USERS:
Initially this information will need to be manually counted. In time the data may be able to be extracted using the reporting function in SHIP or other CMS.

PAPER FORM USERS:

Relates to Section 2, Q11 and 12 on the Initial Client Form and Q11 and 12 on the Ongoing Client Form.

You will need to count the number PRIOR to submitting your monthly data to AIHW so that you can total it at the end of the quarter.

 

 

 

 

 

While services may have concerns about the safety of clients exiting to home (e.g. women and children returning home after experiencing domestic and family violence), the counting rules is to be applied as stated above.  This is the most reliable objective data available at this time.

Number of individual clients who identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.

 

Count the number of individual clients (including children) supported during the quarter who identified as being Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.

SHIP USERS:
You can use the reporting function in SHIP to generate this number.

PAPER FORM USERS:
Relates to Section 1, Q3 on the Initial Client Form

You will need to count this number PRIOR to submitting your monthly data to SHOR so that you can total it at the end of the quarter.

Number of clients where brokerage was provided (only to be reported on where specifically funded for brokerage).

Count the number of clients where brokerage was provided which was funded specifically as brokerage by the department.

Count one for each client who received brokerage.

Note:

Clients may receive brokerage for multiple purposes.

The numeric total per quarter will match the total that you include in your brokerage report for the same period.

Example 1

A client receives brokerage to cover rent arrears and specialist counselling count as one occasion.

Example 2

A service organises and pays for 3 nights of accommodation for a client – count as one occasion.

Example 3

A service pays for a train fare for a client.  Count this as one occasion.

Not able to be captured from data collected in SHS Collection as this may include brokerage from other funding sources so will need to be manually counted.

 

Provision of brokerage report in specified format - (only where specifically funded for brokerage).

Complete the brokerage report in the format provided.

Clients may receive a payment for more than one brokerage purpose (as outlined in the report).  Count one client for each payment.

Not able to be captured from data collected in SHS Collection so will need to be manually counted.

 

Number of clients who identify as being from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse background.

 

 

Count each client who identifies as being from a culturally and linguistically diverse background who has received a service and those who still are receiving a service at the end of the quarter.

 

As part of developing a case plan the client identifies as being from a CALD background. Count as one client.

SHIP OR OTHER CMS USERS:
Initially this information will need to be manually counted. In time the data may be able to be extracted using the reporting function in SHIP or other CMS.

PAPER FORM USERS:

You can use your AIHW data to generate the number of clients born in a country other than Australia where English is not the primary language.

You will need to count the number PRIOR to submitting your monthly data to AIHW so that you can total it at the end of the quarter.

Number of new support periods where the client identified as sleeping rough or in non-conventional accommodation immediately before presentation.

Count the number of new support periods where the client identified as having an episode of sleeping rough or in non-conventional accommodation in the month prior to presentation.

During the counting period, the agency has 30 new support periods.  In the month prior to presenting for support, 15 clients were sleeping in parks or riverbanks, 5 were squatting in abandoned buildings and 10 were staying with friends. Of these, 20 are identified as having experienced rough sleeping immediately before support.

One client had two new support periods during the quarter.  At the commencement of each support period the client identified that they had been sleeping rough during the month before presentation.  This counts as 2.

SHIP OR OTHER CMS USERS:
You can use the reporting function in SHIP or other CMS data to generate this number.

PAPER FORM USERS:

Relates to Section 1, Q14 on the Initial Client Form.

Number of new clients who are experiencing chronic homelessness before requesting support.

 

 

Count the number of new clients that responded that they had not had a permanent place to live for more than one year.

During the counting period, the agency had 30 new clients.  Immediately before support, 18 of these clients were sleeping in the park or riverbank and of these, 12 clients had been doing this for less than a twelve month period and 6 for around 2 years on and off. Count as 6.

SHIP OR OTHER CMS USERS:
You can use the reporting function in SHIP or other CMS data to generate this number.

PAPER FORM USERS:

Relates to Section 1, Q15 on the Initial Client Form. Count the number of new clients that selected options 5 (more than 1 year, to 5 years ago) or 6 (More than 5 years ago).

You will need to count the number PRIOR to submitting your monthly data to AIHW so that you can total it at the end of the quarter.

Number and percentage of eligible presentations that result in an assessment.

 

(Note: The performance target for this measure is expressed as a percentage.)

Count the Number of Assessments using the following categories from the Presenting Source field:

- Self Referral, Specialist Homelessness Service, HPIQ, QPS-Support Link, Centrelink, Neighbourhood Centre, Family Support Service, Other

Count the Number of Eligible Presentations ie the number of clients eligible for and requiring a service, using the following categories from the Primary Presenting Reason field in QHIP:

Seeking Refuge from DFV, Seeking Immediate Supported Accommodation, Seeking Transitional Supported Accommodation, Seeking Homelessness Support, Seeking Brokerage, Safety Alert

Anonymous Presentations are not included in this count.

AND

Express the Number of Assessments as a percentage of Eligible Presentations

 

Use QHIP reports to calculate these measures.

 

Guide to writing case studies

Background Information:

Case studies are a valuable tool for:

·    demonstrating the benefits or outcomes of a program

·    reflective practice in documenting an organisation’s experiences, results, best practice and lessons learned and identifying ways to improve service delivery

·    understanding challenges in working in the field.

Purpose of the Case Studies

The Department of Housing and Public Works will use the case studies to inform monitoring of the performance of funded services and to inform development of programs for people who are experiencing homelessness or at risk of homelessness.

The focus of the case studies in the Homelessness Program Domain Periodic Performance Reporting is on clients, their experience while being supported by the funded service, and the outcomes achieved as a result of the assistance of the funded service, and their own efforts. The case studies complement the quantitative data provided through the Periodic Performance Reporting process. The case studies can provide a much richer picture of the complexities, challenges and achievements of clients who are experiencing homelessness.

Case studies may be published in departmental reports. In the future, it may be useful to use some case study examples to inform practice and service system improvements or share reflections and good practice between service providers. However this would not be done without specific agreement from the relevant service provider.

There are several steps to follow in preparing your case study:

1.   Defining the case study question(s): The first step is to clarify precisely the nature of your case study questions.  A template is provided over the page which includes suggested questions to assist you in developing your case studies. However, you may tailor the case study questions to address additional points or issues.

2.   Deciding on your source of data:  Case studies can incorporate a number of tools and sources of evidence. Among these are:

·    Direct observation

·    Participant observation

·    Interviews

·    Case Service records

·    Surveys

·    Questionnaires

 

When preparing the case study, it is important to consider the reliability of the data and to minimise errors and biases in data collection and analysis.   The use of multiple tools and data sources can assist in this process.

3.   Obtaining consent:  If services use case service records or interviews to assist in preparing case studies, consent will need to be obtained from clients or interviewees.  A sample consent form is attached.  In terms of protecting client privacy and confidentiality, it is critical that data is de-identified (i.e. no names), and that any identifying information is removed (e.g. any information that is so specific and unique to that individual that they could be identified from this information). 

Preparing the Case Study

The following key questions are provided to guide you in preparing case studies for Periodic Performance Reporting:

·    Who? Give a title e.g. Ms X, not real name, or it may be a group e.g. budgeting course, support group.

·    Why? Explain the background of the client/group and any presenting issues.

·    What? Outline the actions taken. What happened?

·    How long? What was the length of time covered by the case study? How many hours of work were involved? How long did the group run and for how many hours?

·    What was the outcome for client/s? What was achieved? How has the client/s situation improved as a result of their involvement with your service? Ensure there is a clear description of “Before” and “After” so there is no confusion as to how the client/s situation changed as a result of their involvement with your service.

·    How does the outcome compare with what would have happened if you had ‘done nothing’? Describe what you think would have happened if there had been no service provided to the client/s. Would the outcome have been the same anyway?  Would they be worse off if they had not received a service?

·    What did you learn for improving service delivery and practice? Describe any lessons learnt, successes and barriers or challenges that impacted on the achievement of outcomes? What are the key learnings, and how can these be incorporated into future service delivery and practice? 

Use the questions as prompts to assist you in developing your case study. You may choose to answer the questions directly or you may choose to cover them through your ‘story’ of the case study.  Quotes from client/s can be very powerful, just remember to get consent for use of any quotes.

If you have other questions or areas that you feel need to be included, please do. Remember: keep it brief! Information can be provided in dot-point format.


 


CASE STUDY CONSENT FORM

Consent

I give my consent for de-identified information provided by me to insert name of service"  to be used to develop a case study to assist in the performance reporting of the service.

I consent to the use of quote/s I have provided to insert name of service"  is to be used in the case study. (Remove this section or strike through if not needed.)

Name (please print)

 

Signature

 

Information

What will the information be used for?

insert name of service"  is funded by the Department of Housing and Public Works. As part of the funding agreement, insert name of service"  must report to the Department of Housing and Public Works about how the service is assisting people and what results are being achieved. These reports may include case studies that demonstrate client experiences and outcomes.

The Department of Housing and Public Works will use the case studies to inform their monitoring of the performance of the funded service and to inform development of programs for people who are experiencing homelessness.

The case studies may be published in government reports.

What you will be asked to do?

If you agree to participate, we will use the case notes we have on file to construct a de-identified case study about your experience of the service.

Your participation

The case study will not use your name, but will instead refer to say “person X”. Any specific information that might identify you will not be included.

What if I change my mind?

You may withdraw your consent at any time and your information will not be used.  Please notify [insert name of contact staff member] if you would like to withdraw consent or would like further information about the case study.


Attachment 2

Service Agreement (Part C)-Specificagtions for Community and Homelessness Services

 

 

 

Department of Housing and Public Works

QLD-GOV-Crest

Service Agreement – Funding and Service Details

Homelessness funding under the Community Services Act 2007

Version 1.0

 

PLEASE NOTE:

 

The Service Agreement comprises two parts:

 

·    Funding and Service Details

·    Standard Terms

 

 

 

THE PARTIES:

 

Director-General for the Department of Housing and Public Works

 

 

and

 

 

Name of funded organisation

Insert full legal name"

ABN/ACN

Insert ABN"

Service Agreement number

Insert Org number as per GRS"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment 2

Service Agreement (Part C)-Specificagtions for Community and Homelessness Services

 

1.    Formation of Service Agreement

1.1     Service Agreement

(a)     Subject to these Funding and Service Details being signed by both parties, a Service Agreement will commence on the Agreement Commencement Date and will continue for the Term.

(b)     The Service Agreement is comprised of the documents specified in clause 1.2 of the Standard Terms.

1.2     Commencement and duration

Agreement Commencement Date

Insert date of commencement of first schedule"

Agreement Expiry Date

[Insert] OR insert ‘The date of expiry or termination of the last remaining Funding Schedule’ 

1.3     Funding Schedules

Each attached Funding Schedule prescribes:

(a)     Funding that We will provide to You, including the basis on which the Funding will be paid; and

1   

(b)     the Services that You must deliver and that You must use the Funding towards, including:

(i)      the Establishment Date (if any) for the Services;

(ii)      Deliverables and Service Delivery Requirements; and

(iii)     some specific requirements that You must comply with, such as Reporting Requirements.

1.4     Further versions

If these Funding and Service Details refer to a document, specification, guideline, policy or standard that You must comply with, meet or have regard to:

 

(a)     We may, from time to time, issue a new version of that document, specification, guideline, policy or standard;

2   

(b)     We will notify You of any such new version, the date that it is to take effect from and the Funding or the Services to which it relates; and

3           

(c)     the new version will apply to the Funding and Services described in the notice given under subclause (b) from the date of effect stated in the notice.

2.    Terminology

(a)     Certain words or phrases with capital letters that are used in these Funding and Service Details (e.g. “Certification”) are defined in clause 7.

(b)     Other words or phrases with capital letters that are used generally in the Service Agreement (e.g. Funding) are defined in clause 31 of the Standard Terms.

(c)     In these Funding and Service Details, unless otherwise stated references to “clauses” mean clauses in these Funding and Service Details and references to “items” mean items in a Funding Schedule.

3.   
Address and Contact details

3.1     Your address and Your Contact Officer

Your Contact Officer

(person and/or position)

insert organisation contact"

 

Postal address

insert organisation postal address"

Telephone number

insert organisation telephone number"

Fax number

insert organisation fax number"

E-mail address

insert organisation email address"

 

3.2     Our address and Our Contact Officer

Our Contact Officer

(person and/or position)

insert depart contact name or position"

 

Postal address

insert departmental postal address"

Telephone number

insert departmental telephone number"

Fax number

insert dept fax number"

E-mail address

insert dept email address"

 

Note:  These are the general address and contact details for the Service Agreement, including for the purposes of sending any notices under the Service Agreement.

4.    Departures from Standard Terms

4.1     Clauses in Standard Terms that do not apply

The following clauses in the Standard Terms do not apply to the Service Agreement:

Not applicable

4.2     Clauses in Standard Terms that are modified

The following clauses in the Standard Terms are modified in the way specified below:

Not applicable

5.    Governing Act

The Funding is provided under the Act, which is the “Governing Act” for the purposes of the Service Agreement. 

6.    Specific Terms of Funding

6.1     Quality Standards

The Services must comply with the Quality Standards unless:

(a)     item 6.4 of the Funding Schedule states otherwise; or

(b)     We notify You otherwise.

 

 

6.2     Certification Scheme

(a)     The Services are In-Scope for Certification unless specified otherwise at item 6.5 of the Funding Schedule or otherwise notified by us.

(b)     If the Services are In-Scope for Certification:

(i)   You are subject to the Certification Scheme in relation to the Services; and

(ii)  You must cooperate with any Certification body in relation to any Certification or other audit process under the Certification Scheme.

6.3     Audit and Certification of Services

(a)     If the Services are In-Scope for Certification as at the Schedule Start Date, You must achieve Certification covering the Services by the earlier of within the timeframe notified by Us and maintain that Certification for the term of the Service Agreement.

4   

(b)     If the Services are not In-Scope for Certification as at the Schedule Start Date, but You are subsequently notified that the Services have become In-Scope for Certification, You must achieve Certification covering the Services by the earlier of within the timeframe notified by Us and maintain that Certification for the term of the Service Agreement.

5           

6.4     Self-assessment

If the Services are required to comply with the Quality Standards but are not In-Scope for Certification, then:

(a)     You must self-assess against the Quality Standards, using the self-assessment tool available on Our Website and in accordance with the Quality Framework;

(b)     You must provide a copy of Your self-assessment to Us; and

(c)     Your self-assessment does not limit Our performance review or audit rights under the Standard Terms.

6.5     Audit reports

You agree that:

(a)     any Certification body that conducts a Certification Audit of You may provide Us with a copy of any audit report prepared and any information about You or any of the Services obtained in the course of conducting the Certification Audit; and

(b)     We may use any such Certification Audit or information as part of Our standard and performance monitoring to ensure that You are complying with Your obligations under the Service Agreement.

6.6     Approved Service Provider in accordance with Part 4 of the Governing Act

If, under section 25 of the Act:

(c)     the Funding is stopped, the Funding Schedule will automatically terminate and the provisions in clauses 13.3(a) and 13.3(c) of the Standard Terms will apply; or

(d)     all Funding under the Service Agreement is stopped, the Service Agreement will automatically terminate and the provisions in clauses 13.3(b) and 13.3(c) of the Standard Terms will apply.

6.7     Stopping Funding – Additional Provisions

Despite anything in the Service Agreement, the Funding can be suspended or stopped under section 37 of the Act due to non-compliance with a compliance notice in certain circumstances.  If, under section 37 of the Act:

(a)     all of the Funding under a Funding Schedule is stopped due to non-compliance with a compliance notice, the Funding Schedule will automatically terminate and the provisions in clauses 13.3(a) and 13.3(c) of the Standard Terms will apply; or

(b)     all Funding under the Service Agreement is stopped due to non-compliance with a compliance notice, the Service Agreement will automatically terminate and the provisions in clauses 13.3(b) and 13.3(c) of the Standard Terms will apply.

 

7.    Definitions and interpretation for Funding and Service Details

In these Funding and Service Details (including the Funding Schedules), unless otherwise stated or a contrary intention appears:

“Act” means the Community Services Act 2007, as amended from time to time;

“Approved Service Provider” has the meaning given in the Act;

“Certification” means certification for the purpose of the Certification Scheme by an external body accredited by the JAS-ANZ that the Services comply with the Quality Standards; 

“Certification Audit” means a certification, re-certification or maintenance audit conducted under the Certification Scheme;

“Certification Scheme” means the “Human Services Quality Framework Scheme” administered by JAS-ANZ, under which bodies accredited by JAS-ANZ can certify and re-certify that an organisation providing human services is providing those services in accordance with the Quality Standards;

“Geographic Catchment Area” means the area where the Services are to be delivered, as described in terms of the Australian Bureau of Statistics Statistical Areas;

“In-Scope for Certification” means, in relation to the Services, that We have determined that the Services are within the scope of, and subject to the Certification Scheme;

“JAS-ANZ” means the Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand;

“One-off Funding” means any Funding under a Funding Schedule that is approved as “one-off funding” under the Act;

 “Online Reporting System” means the online reporting system for the electronic lodgement of data and reports under the Reporting Requirements, which system includes:

(c)     OASIS available at: http://www.communities.qld.gov.au/gateway/funding-and-grants/online-acquittal-support-information-system-oasis; and

 “Quality Framework” means the Human Services Quality Framework as published, updated, amended or replaced from time to time by the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services and available on Our Website, as;

Quality Standards” means the standards for the provision of community services forming part of the Quality Framework, as updated, amended or replaced from time to time by the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services; and

 “Standard Terms” means the document titled ‘Service Agreement – Standard Terms’ available on

http://www.hpw.qld.gov.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/ServiceAgreementStandardTerms.pdf, including any new version issued from time to time in accordance with the Standard Terms.

“Our Website” means http://www.hpw.qld.gov.au

 

 


EXECUTED as an Agreement

 

 

 

SIGNED for and on behalf of the State of Queensland Government by [insert name] [insert position] as an authorised delegate for [insert name]

 

 

)

)

)

)

)

)

)

)

 

 

 

û____________________________________

                       (signature)

 

 

û____________________________________

                       (signature of witness)

 

 

 

û___________________________________

                       (date)

 

 

û____________________________________

                       (name of witness)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SIGNED by [insert name] [insert position - office bearer from the Management Committee/Board of Management e.g Chairperson/President, Treasurer, Secretary] for and on behalf of [insert name of funded organisation] as its duly authorised officer:

 

)

)

)

)

)

)

)

 

 

 

û___________________________________

                       (signature)

 

 

 

 

û____________________________________

                       (signature of witness)

 

 

 

û___________________________________

                       (date)

 

 

û____________________________________

                       (name of witness)

 

 

 

6          [OR INSERT EXECUTION CLAUSE – Company]"

 

SIGNED for and on behalf of

[NAME OF CORPORATION]

in accordance with section 127 of the Corporations Act 2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

û__________________________________

(signature of director/secretary)

 

 

 

û__________________________________

(signature of director)

 

û___________________________________

(name of director/secretary)

 

 

 

û____________________________________

(name of director)

 

 

 

 

û____________________________________

(date)

 

 


 


FUNDING SCHEDULE:

1   

 

1.    SERVICE AGREEMENT

This Funding Schedule relates to Service Agreement number [insert org number as per GRS" ].

2.    IMPORTANT DATES

Schedule Start Date

insert

Schedule End Date

insert

Establishment Date

insert start date if the service will start after the schedule start date"  or insert Not Applicable"

3.    SERVICES

3.1.  Services to be delivered

The Services to be delivered are those required for the provision of homelessness accommodation and are described in more detail in item 6.1.

3.2.  Current details

(a)     Your details (service number, name and Departmental region) for delivery of the Services, as they appear on the Online Reporting System (OASIS), are set out below.

Service number

Service name    

Departmental region

insert service number as per GRS"

 

insert

(b)     You must ensure that all of Your details relevant to Your provision of the Services (e.g. service details, contact person or position, street, postal and email addresses, telephone and fax numbers) are current on the Online Reporting System (OASIS).

4.    FUNDING UNDER FUNDING SCHEDULE

$[Insert total amount, incorporating (per annum Funding x Funding Schedule period) + one-off Funding]"

Refer to item 5 for further details about the Funding under this Funding Schedule.

5.    FUNDING DETAILS

5.1.  Per annum Funding

Description

Funding amount (excl. GST)

Salary-related items

$insert     

Other expense items

$insert  

Brokerage

$insert amount or not applicable"  

Total Funding (per annum)

$insert

 

5.2.  One-off Funding

(a)  One-off Funding for purchase of Assets

Description

Funding amount (excl. GST)

insert

$insert     

(b)  Other one-off Funding

Description

Funding amount (excl. GST)

insert

$insert     

5.3.  Funding Source

Homelessness

6.   DETAILS ABOUT SERVICES

6.1.  Description of Services

Service Users

insert relevant target group/s as per 4.2"

Service type(s)

insert relevant service type/s as per 4.1"

Service sub-type(s)

insert service sub-type/s as per 4.1"

Service particulars

insert as per 4.1 of program guidelines + any additional requirements for this service"

Geographic Catchment Area where Services to be delivered

insert as per 4.2.3 of program guidelines"

Operating hours

insert operating hours that reflect the service type and model to be provided"

 

After hours and closure arrangements

insert after hours and closure arrangements  that reflect the service type and model to be provided"

 

 


 

6.2.  Deliverables

The required Deliverables for the Services are specified below:

Outcomes



Service  User code

Service type code

Service sub-type(s)

Outcome code and measure

 

Target

 

All Service User Groups

ST4 and 5 [delete as applicable]

 

_

OMO1

Number and percentage of eligible presentations  that result in an assessment.

Minimum 90%

 

ST4 and 5

[delete as applicable]

-

OMO2

Number of Case Management/Support Plans established at first contact  for clients identified as having an on-going support need
(Duration of support is specified in Case Management/Support Plan, with review as circumstances change)

Minimum 90% Case Management/Support Plans closed within the duration of need identified in the Case Management/Support Plan

 

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

OMO3

Number and percentage of support periods closed during the quarter where a case management plan was in place.

Minimum 90%

 

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

OMO4

Number and percentage of support periods closed during the quarter where case management plans were in place and half or more of the case management goals had been met

Minimum 75%

 

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

OMO5

Number and percentage of support periods that ended with the client housed in secure and sustainable housing.

Minimum 60%

 

Outputs



Service  User code

Service type code

Service sub-type(s)

Output code and measure

 

Minimum outputs per annum

Minimum service users per annum

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

 

6.3. 
Service Delivery Requirements

The Services must be delivered in accordance with and meet the requirements set out in the documents specified below, as available on Our Website.

Document type

Document name

Document section

Program guidelines   

Homelessness Program Guidelines, or such updated or amended versions as notified to You by Us

4 and 5

*If You cannot locate a document on Our Website, please contact Us and We will assist You or provide You with a copy of the document.  Refer to clause 1.4 of the Funding and Service Details about issuing new versions of documents.

6.4. Exempt from Quality Standards

Not applicable [or insert details of exemption from Quality Standards]"

6.5. Audit and Certification under the Quality Framework

The Services are not In-Scope for Certification unless We notify You otherwise.

6.6. Performance measures

You must collect and report on the following performance measurement data in relation to the Services.  The table in item 6.7 contains the requirements for reporting on this performance measurement data.



Service  User code

Service  type code

Service sub-type code

Measure

Outcome measures

 

All Service User Groups

ST4 and 5

_

OMO1

Number and percentage of eligible presentations  that result in an assessment.

ST4 and 5

-

OMO2

Number of Case Management/Support Plans established at first contact  for clients identified as having an on-going support need
(Duration of support is specified in Case Management/Support Plan, with review as circumstances change)

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

OMO3

Number and percentage of support periods closed during the quarter where a case management plan was in place.

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

OMO4

Number and percentage of support periods closed during the quarter where case management plans were in place and half or more of the case management goals had been met

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

OMO5

Number and percentage of support periods that ended with the client housed in secure and sustainable housing.



Output measures

All Service User Groups

ST1-5

ST9

ST10-11

AO1.2.02

Number of hours of needs assessment and management of case/service plans provided and number of clients who received this output.

ST6

ST7-8

AO5.4.01

Number of places of temporary supported accommodation and number of clients who received this output.


Throughput measures

 

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS112

Number of support periods that commenced during the quarter

S1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS120

Number of open support periods

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS111

Number of support periods that ended during the quarter


Demographic measures

SU2,SU3,SU4,SU5,SU6

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS110

Number of individual clients who are children

All Service User Groups   

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS35

Number of clients identifying as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander

All Service User Groups   

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS39

Number of clients identifying as being from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse backgrounds

SU13 only

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS118

Number of new support periods where the client identified as sleeping rough or in non-conventional accommodation immediately before presentation

SU9  only

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS119

Number of new clients who are experiencing chronic homelessness immediately before support



Other measures

All Service User Groups   

Only where funded for brokerage

Only where funded for brokerage

1          IS117

Number of clients where brokerage was provided

All Service User Groups   

Only where funded for brokerage

Only where funded for brokerage

IS61

Provision of brokerage report in specified format.    

All Service User Groups   

ST1-6

ST9

ST7-8

ST10-11

IS63

Provision of up to three brief case studies that demonstrate client experiences and outcomes.

6.7. Data, statements and reports You are to submit

You must submit the data, statements and reports specified below, in each case by the due date and in accordance with the details and standard of reporting requirements and lodgement requirements specified below.

 

Reporting period and due date

Details and standard of reporting

Lodgement

SHS Data

Reporting period:

Monthly

Due date:

By the last day of the following month e.g April data is due by 31 May

SHS data must be supplied to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare on a monthly basis for the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection, and any amendment to, or replacement of, those requirements

SHS Data must be submitted via SHOR and compiled with SHIP or any other AIHW approved client management system

Performance Measurement Data

Reporting period:

Quarterly

Due date:

1 month after the end of each quarter.

Performance Measurement Data as specified in item 6.6 must be collected in accordance with the data requirement and counting rules contained in the applicable funding specification document listed at Item 6.3.

 

Performance Measurement Data must be submitted via OASIS.

Financial Acquittals - Periodic

Reporting period:

Quarterly

Due date:

1 month after the end of each quarter.

A quarterly ‘Financial Acquittal – Periodic’, in the form of a quarterly Special Purpose Financial Statement, must be prepared, providing details of the receipt and use of the Funding.

Each  ‘Financial Acquittal – Periodic’ must:

(a)  be prepared using information extracted from the same source documents and related accounting and management systems that will be relied upon to prepare Your annual audited General Purpose Financial Statement (refer to item ‘Financial Statements’ below);

(b)  contain details at least equivalent to the line items specified at item 5 of this Funding Schedule;

(c)  be signed and certified as correct by two members of Your executive or management committee responsible for Your activities or, if You are a local government authority or tertiary institution, Your chief accounting officer or equivalent.

If the Funding is provided for part of the reporting period a Financial Acquittals- Periodic must still be submitted for the relevant part of that reporting period.

Financial Acquittals – Periodic must be submitted via OASIS.

Financial Statements

Reporting period:

Annual

 

Due date:

In accordance with the lodgement period of Your incorporating legislation, or if not otherwise stated, within 6 months of the end of Your financial year.

1.  You must provide an audited annual statement in the form of a General Purpose Financial Statement prepared in accordance with the Australian Accounting Standards comprising the following documents:

a.   Statement of profit and loss and other comprehensive income

b.   Statement of financial position

c.   Statement of changes in equity

d.   Statement of cashflows

e.   Notes to and forming part of the financial statement

f.    Directors’ statement/declaration,

g.   Independent audit report, and

h.   Asset register in relation to Funded Assets (where applicable).

* If You have more than one Service Agreement with Us, You are only required to submit one copy of the General Purpose Financial Statement to Us.

2.  You must provide an annual acquittal statement for the Funding received during each financial year in the form of a Special Purpose Financial Statement, which must be signed by You and Your auditor and must be prepared:

a.   using information extracted from the same source documents and related accounting and management systems that will be relied upon to prepare Your annual audited General Purpose Financial Statement referred to above; and

b.   either in accordance with, or in a manner and containing information consistent with, the form titled ‘Annual Funding Extract Statement’ available on Our Website.

Financial Statements must be submitted via OASIS.

 

7.   TIMING OF FUNDING PAYMENTS

Payments of the Funding will be made in instalments as specified below.

Funding type

Payment basis and due dates

Per annum Funding (see item 5.1)

Quarterly Payments with Quarterly Financial and Performance Measurement Data

The first quarterly instalment will be paid within 1 month after the Schedule Start Date.  Provided that You are up-to-date with the Reporting Requirements, each remaining quarterly instalment will be paid to You within 1 month after You have submitted all data, statements and reports that You are required to submit during, or in relation to, the immediately preceding quarter, as specified in item 6.7.

One-off Funding (see item 5.2)

 

Not applicable

 

8.  
SPECIAL CONDITIONS

8.1.        Commonwealth requirements

(a)  As of 1 January 2009, under the National Affordable Housing Agreement (NAHA), the term ‘specialist homelessness services’ is used to describe services that were formerly funded under  the Commonwealth Supported Accommodation Assistance Act 1994 (SAAP) and may include other services that assist people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.

(b)  Funded services are expected to meet the directions and priorities governed by SAAP until further notice. 

(c)  The Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services will advise of any changed directions or priorities resulting from the implementation of a new national agenda under the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness (NPAH). 

(d)  You must:

(i)   meet all data collection requirements notified by Us from time to time including (without limitation) the submission of monthly data to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) for the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection and any amendment to, or replacement of, those requirements;

(ii)   agree to the AIHW providing a copy of all information provided by You to Us, including:

aggregated client data that identifies You through Your agency ID as the service or data provider; and

confidentialised unit record data for individuals who sought assistance or were assisted by You,

 

for purposes consistent with the NPAH/NAHA and AIHW Acts, and subject to the confidentiality provisions in s 29 of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Act 1987 (Cth) that prohibit any publication of this data in a manner that identifies any individual or entity;

(iii)  participate, as requested by Us, in all performance monitoring and evaluation processes; and

(iv)  adhere to the Queensland Homelessness Information Platform (QHIP) Policy as provided by Us.

8.2.        Brokerage  [delete if not applicable]

(a)  Brokerage funds must be used within the context of case management. This means that brokerage should provide for the purchase of services and resources considered essential to achieve agreed client outcomes. Brokerage should not be the first or the only support a client receives from the service.

(b)  Brokerage funds must be used in accordance with the “Guidelines for the use of Brokerage Funds in Specialist Homelessness Services 2009”.

8.3.        Crisis Accommodation Program [delete if not applicable]

(a)  If You receive funding from us under the Crisis Accommodation Program under another funding or service agreement and We cease to provide that funding to you for any reason, then we can immediately take any Specified Action by giving You notice and clause 13.3 of the Service Agreement will apply.

(b)  The Table in Attachment 1 outlines the properties You use for the provision of the Services that are supported under the Crisis Accommodation Program.

8.4.        Services specifically funded to target Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [delete if not applicable]

You must ensure that at least 50% of clients identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander annually.

8.5.        Services targeting young people - Young people under 16 years of age [delete if not applicable]

You must follow the ‘Supporting young people under 16 years of age: Guidelines for good practice for Specialist Homelessness Service providers’ guidelines which are available at: http://www.hpw.qld.gov.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/supporting-young-people-under-16years-of-age-guidelines-for-good-practice-for-specialist-homelessnessservices.pdf

8.6.        Services targeting young people (SU4) – Young people under 18 years in care of the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services [delete if not applicable]

(a)  You must accept placement of children and young people involved with the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services (Child Safety) under the Child Protection Act 1999 (Qld) only:

·      on an emergency basis until a more suitable placement can be arranged; and

·      where there are appropriate casework supports in place.

(b)  You must not prioritise clients on the basis of referral by a government department.

(c)  You must only accept Child Safety placements for children aged 13 years and above.

(d)  If You accept a placement of a child/ren and young people involved with Child Safety under the Child Protection Act 1999, the placement will be for the duration of three working days or less, unless you agree to extend beyond this period and the agreement is endorsed by Our local Regional Director or their delegate. Where a placement is extended past three working days, a written agreement must be completed that includes: arrangements for health, education, religion, cultural, family contact, behavioural needs, transitional plans for the child/young person; identification of roles and responsibilities for all parties involved; and a date as agreed upon by all parties for the review of the agreement. This process must include the involvement of an Indigenous Recognised Entity in cases relating to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander children or young people.

(e)  You must give consideration to the ages and needs of the other clients in the service and the need to avoid unreasonable risks from older clients when considering access to Your service by children/young people who are in the care of Child Safety.

(f)   At any point in time, children and young people who are the responsibility of Child Safety must not constitute the majority of Your clients.

(g)  You must allow a Child Safety caseworker access to Your premises for the purpose of providing support to Child Safety clients.

(h)  You must provide Your usual service, as is normally provided to clients of Your specialist homelessness service, to clients who are subject to a child protection order under the Child Protection Act 1999. Any additional support must be negotiated between You and Child Safety.

(i)   If You become aware that a child or young person who has self-referred to Your service is subject to a child protection order under the Child Protection Act 1999, You must inform Child Safety within 24 hours.

(j)   If You have concerns that a child or young person involved with Your service is experiencing intra-familial harm or is at risk of intra-familial harm, You must notify Child Safety of Your concerns.

(k)  If You have concerns that a child or young person involved with Your service is experiencing extra-familial harm or at risk of extra-familial harm, You should notify the Queensland Police Service.

(l)   You must share such information as is necessary for the best interests, wellbeing and safety of the child or young person, with Child Safety.

(m) In the event of an emergency relating to a child or young person Child Safety, You must during office hours contact the Child Safety Service Centre (CSSC) with case management responsibility, notifying them of the incident. In the event that the designated Child Safety Officer for the child or young person is not available, contact should occur with the CSSC intake officer.

8.7.        Services targeting women and children escaping domestic violence (SU3) [delete if not applicable]

You must provide support and supported accommodation services for women and children experiencing domestic and family violence that:

(a)  implements the ‘Practice Standards for Working with Women Affected by Domestic and Family Violence’ supplied by the department found at http://www.communities.qld.gov.au/communityservices/violence-prevention/publications-and-resources; and

(b)  provides a service that is open for 52 weeks a year with 7 day per week on-call service, outside of office hours, to respond to existing clients and new referrals, including the following:

·      when the service has a vacancy, it will be available to accept and commence new intakes until 7pm each day (i.e. client to arrive at the service by 7pm);

·      when the service has a vacancy, referrals will be accepted until 9pm each day for intake the next day; and

·      existing clients and referral organisations will be provided with contact details for the on-call service and on-call staff will respond promptly to all calls;

(c)  accepts referrals and provide services to the target group outside of the specified catchment area on an as needs basis;

(d)  takes state-wide referrals from DVConnect and other services; and

(e)  accepts referrals from the local area, where a risk assessment has determined there will be no compromise to the client’s safety, security and protection or that of others at the service.

9.   ATTACHMENTS

Attachment

Name

Reference

1.  

List of supported properties [delete if not applicable]

 

2.  

Brokerage reporting template [delete if not applicable]

 

 

 


[Delete if not applicable]

Attachment insert

List of supported properties

 

Address/Suburb

Service user group

Minimum units of accommodation

Level of supervision

Crisis Accommodation Program

Yes/No

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

insert

 

Total

insert

 

 

 

Note: Any changes to the property table above will require the negotiation of a variation under the Service Agreement (Part A) – Standard Terms of Funding.

Contact your regional departmental contact officer if changes are required.


[Delete if not applicable]

Attachment insert  

Homelessness Brokerage Funds

 

Quarterly Summary Report

Quarter from: insert start date to insert end date

 

Services to complete Sections 1 and/or 2 as appropriate

 

Section 1: Brokerage used to MAINTAIN accommodation

Occasions provided

(a)           Purpose

(b)           Number of occasions

(c)           Amount ($ whole dollars)

Payment of accommodation related expenses (eg rent arrears, utilities)

(d)            

(e)            

Purchase of specialist support services (eg specialist counselling)

(f)             

(g)            

Other expenses to support achievement of case/support plan *

(h)            

(i)              

* Please outline below the main types of expenses in the “other expenses” category above e.g. essential provisions, educational expenses, medical expenses.

 

Individual clients assisted

(j)            This should be same as performance report

(k)           Total clients[1]:

(l)              

(m)          Total amount[2]: $

(n)           Section 2: Brokerage used to ACCESS accommodation

Occasions provided

(o)           Purpose

(p)           Number of occasions

(q)           Amount ($ whole dollars)

Payment of accommodation related expenses (eg bond, utilities)

(r)             

(s)            

Purchase of specialist support services (eg specialist counselling)

(t)             

(u)            

Other expenses to support achievement of case/support plan *

(v)            

(w)            

* Please outline below the main types of expenses in the “other expenses” category above eg essential provisions, educational expenses, medical expenses.

 

Individual clients assisted

(x)           This should be same as performance report

(y)           Total clients[3]:

(z)             

(aa)         Total amount[4]: $

 


 

[Delete if not applicable]

Attachment insert

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children in remote communities

 

Quarterly Report on daily client usage of accommodation

 

Quarter from: insert start date to insert end date 

 

 

Number of people accommodated (including children) each night

Week beginning

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Example

3

0

5

0

7

3

2

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Attachment 3

Service_Agreement_Standard_Terms V1 0 30April2014

 








































  



Note:

 [1]& 3 Total number of individual clients assisted with brokerage. Clients may be assisted on more than one occasions for multiple purposes eg payment of bond and specialist counselling.

[2]&4 Total amount of brokerage provided during the quarter (across all occasions).